New answers tagged

-3

make the last star gold to indicate that this artist is a "five star artist"


0

For the stars i mostly agree with Divy's outline idea, however instead of grey for black for the outline I'd go with the magenta. I'd also agree that with with both of those being magenta the bottom will dominate the rest of the content, so to counter this i would change the artist's name to magenta as well. This should create a nice looking container for ...


0

I think the rating outlines work well but I would consider moving that Stars up higher to the 3rd line under the geographic location. Seems like important information.


1

I would suggest using multi colored star ratings because in the first example where it is single star, I had an initial assumption that the last star is badly formatted or the interface is buggy/not finished. Actually it was half a star but I interpreted it wrongly. That may lead to confusion and decreased credibility for the site. Since most of the ...


5

Try using outlines but personally for your case here i feel two colors is better than one. It shows some sort of visual hierarchy when it comes to a user making a decision.


13

First i believe you are well prepared to use only star rating system. As there are other ways around to compare products or profile (artists in your case). Side Note: YouTube switched from a star-based system to the binary thumbs-up\thumbs-down, their ratings shot up many-fold. It could be same in your case, Up-votes/Down-votes would be fine i guess. For ...


3

You have heard the expression "Form follows Function"? You mention usability over design, but I suspect what you really meant was usability over visual design. Usability (function) always comes before visual design (form). If a third to half your participants struggled (even if they eventually figure it out) then this would indicate you have a usability ...


2

You can also try playing with typography with some pictogram. That might help in this case. I had a similar issue in one of my project and it worked. Different kind of animations (shake, wobble, rubber band etc.) are also helpful. For example in case of a hard alert, a shaky animation will serve the issue. That will not only attract the eye, but also ...


3

Use a different shade or hue of red/green/yellow/neutral, and use it consistently for your positive/negative/warnings/neutral. Also use iconography along with the colors to enforce the message. For example, use a light red with 1px border along with an "!" icon on all error messages. Ensure that you do not use your primary website color in any messages or UI ...


1

Use a discreet color. If you want to use a another color, then use white or blue. Sometimes a bright, friendly orange works good, too. But don't use a color which annoys the user.


0

You don’t really want to do that As others have noted, the degree of differentiation with either become confusing or indistinguishable. To perceive that many levels of color differentiation, the colors would have to be adjacent. That's rare. Use a small set of key categories to make your system more human-friendly. If you need granularity beyond that,...


2

If you've got sequential data - color brewer gives a maximum of 9 data points that you can use to sensibly separate your data. It's worth noting that all of these are colourblind friendly.


24

I know that we should answer based on your requirements, but in this case there is a chance your requirements are wrong. Let me explain. there are 20 priority levels. You can not have 20 priority levels! Here are some reasons. 1) Categories Prioritize means to give categories so humans can detect and compare, and then do some actions based on that ...


36

I would split the 20 priority levels into 4 distinct sets (for the sake of colour coding at least). For example on Microsoft TFS (collaboration tools for software projects) there are 4 severity levels you can set against a bug. Critical, High, Medium, Low. You could break your priorities into these groups then set 5 different shades of the same colour for ...


1

20 shades are a lot, since different types of screens have different resolution and rendering of the colors. People with eyesight problems can also have an issue with identifying the different shades. Lastly, many colors makes a lot of visual noise. One solution may be to say the top 5 priorities have colors and the rest have no color, but are identified ...


3

A single colour sounds like a strong approach when you have so many degrees of priority (if you're working with saturation it also works for colourblind users too). If you had two or three degrees then it might be worth looking at different colours: say green for low, yellow for mid, and red for high priority as long as they were accompanied by some sort ...


2

Will assume that you will categorize the priorities later; Red and derivates colors mostly used for URGENT or to ATTRACT EYES Blue and derivates colors mostly used for PROGRESSION or IT'S JUST FINE Green you can keep if for SAFE or SUCCESSFUL And accordingly, make your priorities somewhere around these colors and their levels because these are the ...


3

You might be good just switching arrow directions (pardon the ASCII art): Read: arrow points away from the icon []-> Write: arrow points towards the icon ->[] I'm basing the suggestion on the data flow direction (when reading, data "goes out", when writing data "goes in")


1

Cubase (digital audio workstation) uses red for writing and green for reading automation values (it also uses 'W' and 'R') BUT you should never rely on colour for indication of status - especially if you're using red and green! As has been pointed out in the comments, your icons are not clearly defined. Make sure they're easily readable in monochrome before ...


2

No, there are no standard colours used for "read from" or "write to". So other than choosing icons which are clear in the first place (those that you show are not), the important part is that you are consistent in your colours if you decide that you need to have different colours in the first place.


2

Short answer: it helps to reduce eye fatigue. There are three types of cones in the eye, each responsible for sensing a different range of wavelength. If you stare at one particular color for a while, those cones responsible for sensing that color will become fatigued, and your perception of color will become skewed (this is why if you stare at an inverted ...


1

Because it's a neutral color that doesn't strain the eye and allows for good legibility when using black or white fonts, and its neutrality aids to place the focus on the real content window. The shade of gray will vary depending on the software, of course, ranging from a light gray to a very dark gray. As for studies, here you can see why to use gray and ...



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