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36

The following screenshot is taken from the speech by Jon Wiley at UXweek 2011 (Original video). He explains the design decisions made by google in the past months. Look towards the end (after minute 27) of the video to see it by yourself: red is for "create something" green is for "share something" blue is for "do something" (e.g. submit a form) Keep ...


35

First things first, this is what it looks like to color blind (deuteranopia; by the most common form of colorblindness) users: (also the zebrastripes are almost impossible to see, colorblind or not) Red on green is a classically bad color combo, though your magenta text isn't entirely unreadable. The background color is very loud though which can be hard ...


30

You are probably asking for colors to communicate too much information. Also, having five different background colors for the rows in your table will be too messy and hard to read. I would suggest something else, like: A star system from one to five stars. Different icons to represent different types of customers. I like the second option, because it ...


22

Corporate colors are for visual branding NOT UI development. The UI is supposed to assist and get out of the way of the user. That's why most tend to be neutral in their colors (grays, gray blues, etc.)


21

I think it's part aesthetics - as @marcintreder suggests - and part visual anchoring. The horizontal bar is a cue that the page is scrolled all the way to the top - which is especially useful in "light"/"minimal"/"uncluttered" designs without so many other cues.


17

The metro interface is actually made of one color in two shades, a dark one in the background and light one for the tiles. The dark color can be replaced by gray. You never get real black in any of microsoft's interfaces, and you don't get two different colors. The other colors come from content displayed on live tiles - photos and videos, mainly, but also ...


12

While a good color scheme will help, the key thing to note here is the need for contrast for enhanced readability. To quote this article from eyemagzine Light grey text on a white background and small text size both lead to an increased orbicularis oculi activity and decreased blinking. These two conditions are related to text quality, and we would ...


10

Yes, the colors may not be good for some. The screen is very organized, but I would suggest a better color theme. Not a drastic one, but I would make the background color much lighter than it is, as it is too loud. It seem to draw my attention passed the content. Also red, is not the best default choice for font, as most website use that for errors, and ...


10

I dont think you will get a definite answer to this since the colors you choose will have to mesh well with your game design and background. However I would recommend making the choices prominent and if possible use pictorial representations to show what each level might be. here is a good example : Alternatively you could go with a color scheme which ...


10

There are many studies about colour, but what is important is to use bright colours for the things that require action. We associate actions with the traffic lights. Green go, yellow check if you have time and red stop. Your actions are: Open - Go, so definitely green To be confirmed - Requires check - definitely yellow Postponed- Requires a bright ...


8

Red text on a green background never works very well, which is counter-intuitive because red and green are opposite on the color wheel, so one would think that the contrast would be great. Unfortunately, it doesn't really work that way, and it creates a kind of micro-haloing effect when your mind tries to sort out the difference. The green background looks ...


8

Searching on the web for this I came up with this article. Quoting from an "Applied Colour Psychology Specialist": Colour Psychology Blue is the colour of the intellect, the mind, making it the colour of communication and when you think about social media, it’s all about communicating. Blue also has the perception as being trustworthy, dependable, safe ...


8

The background you choose for your website has the power to set the theme and set the mood for your site at a glance. But the main aim of the background should be to enhance the visual experience and not to distract the user too much from the content. Analysis: The image with grey background has more depth and there is a sense that the content area is to ...


8

I feel your pain on this one. I like to refer to Adobe's Kuler for some good ideas on color palettes/complementary colors. Also, PatternTap has a huge gallery of navigation elements, although if you're just looking for new colors it might be a bit much to sift through. I think the principle to follow here above all else is simple: make sure there's enough ...


8

European ski slopes also have black. Mountain bike trails are also green, blue, red and black. Since this project is for younger ages, I'd skip the black. Such sporting activities as skiing, biking and others also make use of shapes to further differentiate, rather than using colours alone - thus appealing (or not) to the subconscious. So for example a ...


8

The best practice here is to display the social media icons in a neutral color, usually grey. This approach is both widely practiced and accepted. It's worth noting that most of the major social media brands have usage guidelines that explicitly prohibit the above. For example, Facebook's Brand permission center lists the specific brand assets that are ...


8

CheckMyColours.com uses the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0) contrast tests. The validity of the tests is something to bring up with WCAG rather than checkmycolours.com. I am unaware of the WCAG providing the research supporting their contrast ratio standards. However, my experience with those standards is that they are fairly lax. I've ...


8

The Dark Horse Analytics blog has the best explanation on how to make tables more visually appealing by actually removing the distracting visual elements from them: http://darkhorseanalytics.com/blog/clear-off-the-table/ If you look at the blog you'll see that they advise against the 'zebra stripes' approach, which in my experience causes other design ...


8

I've realised after writing this answer that @Brendon suggested the same in the comments - so I'm happy for any answer of his to take precendence. You want Colorbrewer, its the most awesome set of visually distinguishable colours. Given the parameters you've suggested (7 sequential colours) you want something similar to this pallette. With my client I just ...


8

You are correct. You should ignore the Technique 2.2.1 and only use Guideline 1.4.3. The reasons are as follows: Technique 2.2.1 is only a suggestion. As you point out, Technique 2.2.1 is “open to change.” It’s listed in a 14-year-old working draft that apparently hasn’t gone anywhere, and for good reason, as the remaining points will illustrate. ...


7

The dark and complex interface is a badge of honour This was tackled by IDEO when they set out to redesign the Bloomberg terminal (see the article). They found that... ...the design also incorporated certain “badge of honor” elements inspired by expert users of the previous system... and ...an estimated 75,000 machines in use worldwide—including ...


7

I know of no good evidence that certain sexes intrinsically respond 'better' to certain colours. Modern gendered coloured schemes are pretty recent - back in the 19th century, pink was a boy's colour, for instance (because it's red-ish, and the thinking was that red = virile). What you can do, however, is use colours that match the typical branding of the ...


7

I think you can get 5 distinctive enough colors that can impart the necessary notion of sequence or magnitude (lighter to darker): It's a matter of mixing the colors in the Hue/Saturation/Brightness (HSB) color model using simple arithmetic. In the above example the top color (in HSB color model) is hue:60 saturation: 25% brightness: 100%. Each ...


7

I'm faced with that problem every day - both in creating new displays and updating old ones. From experience once you get past two colors you have a mess that is very hard to digest - UNLESS the colors are RARELY used. By rarely I mean that most screens do not have a color and only rarely are there more than 2 or 3 colored (whatever combination) rows on a ...


6

The Colour Contrast Check is a great resource to test whether or not your colors are compliant with various standards. After checking your colors here, it seems like your design is only partway compliant. That aside, the green is rather bold and aggressive for a background. Depending on your target market this may work if it is somewhat of a niche market. ...


6

Can't think of any. It's probably aesthetics. Recently I've been split-testing top-bars of large eCommerce website. The reason was changes made due to visual aesthetics Results: top of the top bar wasn't making any statistically significant difference in conversion (cpc business model, large sample - more than 0,5 mln people), no matther if it was pale or ...


6

This is both hard to read and aesthetically off putting. To qualify myself, I'm the owner of emeraldcode.com and kitgui.com and you can see UI design choices there. Note that my design choices are just that. I chose them, I didn't build them. I know that I personally suck at implementing design just like I know I should not go out to American Idol and ...


6

Personal opinion: The font size is a bit small The serif font isn't the best for readability Not sure about the colour contrast of some of the selected states/hover of the menu options Centrally justified text isn't great for readability either Just checked the green text for colour contrast and it seems to pass WCAG AA guidelines


6

Both "register" and "Sign up" are bland and should be avoided in an actual call to action. Sign up is generally not preferred as it can be confused with "sign in". Note that "register" is still fine for a secondary command like when you're at a login screen and you don't have a login; register is the obvious thing to look for, so don't break those ...


6

My suggestion is not to do this. Hue doesn't have an inherent order (ROYGBIV is surprisingly non-intuitive especially when you have to compare across the rainbow). "Is teal before or after forest green?" And individual colors communicate entirely the wrong meaning: e.g., when the project is 'red' does that mean it's behind? or in trouble? or blocked? Not ...



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