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36

Yes, it's bad design for its lack of signifiers (signs in the world that offer guidance). You can't distinguish what device it belongs to by just looking at it. You can't know its purpose without trying it out. It does't show its state clearly. Could we establish a clear relationship between one state and one temperature easily and consistently? I don't ...


16

Yes, Use of grey scale for depicting temperature is not at all a good idea. The photograph shows clearly the change in intensity as the knob moves from white to grey. But it doesn't communicate the purpose of intensity, specially knowing that this knob is for adjusting the temperature, I think they got it all wrong. A simple color depiction would have ...


7

The attribute you are looking for is “relative luminance,” L, which, for a standard monitor, can be calculated as: L = 0.2126 * Rg + 0.7152 * Gg + 0.0722 * Bg, Where Rg, Gg and Bg are R, G, B values transformed as follows: if R <= 10 then Rg = R/3294, else Rg = (R/269 + 0.0513)^2.4 if G <= 10 then Gg = G/3294, else Gg = (G/269 + ...


5

Combining the answer by @pzw and the original knop, referring a bit to @AntonioMarquis : we don't have to mix the colors to get the idea of 'temparature' across. These knobs might, indeed, be hiding in dark places, so let's keep a fair amount of contrast in the graphics. Just adding some (solid) color would do the trick. I also chose light blue instead of ...


3

"Green turns to grey" is not strictly true - For Deuteranopes (the most common form of colour blindness) green turns to a sort of murky brown colour that would be distinguishable from grey. You can check this for yourself with one of the many browser plugins that re-colour pages as colourblind users would see them. This effectively solves the problem of ...


3

F.lux has some information that may be relevant to this situation. F.lux is a software that overlays your desktop screen and adjusts colors depending on the time of day to make it easier on the eyes. f.lux research Blue Light Affects Sleep (and here's why) We know that night-time exposure to blue light keeps people up late. We believe that f.lux ...


3

I think you're a bit confused here. HSL stands for Hue, Saturation, Lightness. If you need to know white= 100% Lightness. So the opposite to white is still L, only that at 0% (thus if you use any value for H and S, then add 0% for the L value, you'll get black). You can see the w3 recommendations with examples here As for HSV, it's a bit more complex, ...


3

According to the WCAG 2.0 web accessibility standards, the contrast for a text and background color should be a ratio of at least 4.5:1. Their checker shows your current background colors as being too light. I have taken screenshots of the differences: There is not enough contrast between the background color and the text. If the eye has to ...


2

If you want to check the readability of text in contrast to the background use the following link - webaim.org/resources/contrastchecker It will allow you to easily identify whether there is enough contrast between the text and background to determine if people with visual impairments can read the text. It also helps with meeting Level AA (or AAA) ...


2

Well, since you ask for it, here you have a very complete study with examples and a lot of data, another very conceptual study on what they call data hallucination , reference on Circadian clock. Keep in mind this is very technical information, and while very useful, maybe a bit overkill for your needs. Also, there's something that is not being considered ...


2

I made some simulations with ColorOracle: It looks like it works just fine for red-green colorblindness (deuteronopia and protanopia) but those with blue-green issues (tritanopia) will have a hard time seeing things. And that's something you can't quite fix with a slight palette adjustment. You'd have to move the green all the way over to yellow, or you ...


2

Text Color & Contrast Pick a text color that has enough contrast with the background color to be visible to all users. Check the contrast level with the WebAIM Color Contrast Checker site. Avoid pure black (#000) against a white background because that can make letters dance for readers with dyslexia, but #222 (which is slightly lighter than pure black) ...


2

The only benefit of choosing a white background over a light grey background is that it arguably gives you a broader range of text colours that you can use, and still remain within accepted usability and accessibility guidelines. In other words, if you want to use blue text you would be able to use a slightly lighter shade of blue on a white background, ...


1

I think it doesn't really matter for the healthy users as long as the content is easily readable. However, you should consider testing the contrast for the color blind and visually impaired users. A way to do it is to use the NoCoffee Chrome extension which can simulate a lot of vision impairments. You need to test the Low Contrast Sensitivity.


1

Found some good suggestions here: https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/making-your-website-senior-friendly and here: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/usability-for-senior-citizens/ I would also add: Allow font sizes to be changed. Do not prevent them. Make help easy to find - use tooltips & cover every possible option in your FAQ or help pages. ...


1

It could be a good design. A lot of times users would think an A/C temperature needed to be a specific number. The truth is that the A/C should be set to something comfortable. In an office environment this leads to people "fighting" over the A/C setting. It also leads people to set the setting when they are not supposed to. For example setting a dial to ...



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