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35

Yes, it's bad design for its lack of signifiers (signs in the world that offer guidance). You can't distinguish what device it belongs to by just looking at it. You can't know its purpose without trying it out. It does't show its state clearly. Could we establish a clear relationship between one state and one temperature easily and consistently? I don't ...


25

The instinct of whether to trust a site is affected by many different things, some of them conscious, some not. The decision of whether to trust will not be based entirely upon colour. There will be a multitude of cues that will help or hinder trust! Let's say that like in your example, the branding and colours used on the site are very much in tune with ...


16

Yes, Use of grey scale for depicting temperature is not at all a good idea. The photograph shows clearly the change in intensity as the knob moves from white to grey. But it doesn't communicate the purpose of intensity, specially knowing that this knob is for adjusting the temperature, I think they got it all wrong. A simple color depiction would have ...


8

I depends on your target users, and the context you are using it in. There are no hard and fast rules about a specific colour being bad. For example, a dark colour for the website of a supermarket chain might give people pause for thought, but be perfectly fine for a site like thinkgeek. Blue - Tends to be used to indicate corporate websites, or online ...


6

The attribute you are looking for is “relative luminance,” L, which, for a standard monitor, can be calculated as: L = 0.2126 * Rg + 0.7152 * Gg + 0.0722 * Bg, Where Rg, Gg and Bg are R, G, B values transformed as follows: if R <= 10 then Rg = R/3294, else Rg = (R/269 + 0.0513)^2.4 if G <= 10 then Gg = G/3294, else Gg = (G/269 + ...


5

Combining the answer by @pzw and the original knop, referring a bit to @AntonioMarquis : we don't have to mix the colors to get the idea of 'temparature' across. These knobs might, indeed, be hiding in dark places, so let's keep a fair amount of contrast in the graphics. Just adding some (solid) color would do the trick. I also chose light blue instead of ...


3

I think you're a bit confused here. HSL stands for Hue, Saturation, Lightness. If you need to know white= 100% Lightness. So the opposite to white is still L, only that at 0% (thus if you use any value for H and S, then add 0% for the L value, you'll get black). You can see the w3 recommendations with examples here As for HSV, it's a bit more complex, ...


3

As @laurendankiewicz proposed, you can use outlined icon, like pictured: But I think you also need to consider: You shouldn't use color code as the only mean to convey information for accessibility reasons. You could use tools like NoCoffee vision simulator to assess it If the color of the line is important information for a user, it's better to ...


3

F.lux has some information that may be relevant to this situation. F.lux is a software that overlays your desktop screen and adjusts colors depending on the time of day to make it easier on the eyes. f.lux research Blue Light Affects Sleep (and here's why) We know that night-time exposure to blue light keeps people up late. We believe that f.lux ...


3

According to the WCAG 2.0 web accessibility standards, the contrast for a text and background color should be a ratio of at least 4.5:1. Their checker shows your current background colors as being too light. I have taken screenshots of the differences: There is not enough contrast between the background color and the text. If the eye has to ...


2

If you want to check the readability of text in contrast to the background use the following link - webaim.org/resources/contrastchecker It will allow you to easily identify whether there is enough contrast between the text and background to determine if people with visual impairments can read the text. It also helps with meeting Level AA (or AAA) ...


2

A black website isn't a bad thing and I do not believe it will affect users' trust. I did a little research to verify my answers and I could find no articles that supported an argument for black negating a users trust. Most articles define black as a color that is used for luxury products. It also is used commonly for impulse buys. You can see the details of ...


2

Don't do it Text readability has been extensively studied. Bolding a paragraph or changing colors will be very annoying to readers who are (and have every right to be) used to plain text layouts. If you have a problem with orientation, then there are many other ways to solve it. Chaptering, line breaks, horizontal rules, narrower column widths, obvious ...


2

Well, since you ask for it, here you have a very complete study with examples and a lot of data, another very conceptual study on what they call data hallucination , reference on Circadian clock. Keep in mind this is very technical information, and while very useful, maybe a bit overkill for your needs. Also, there's something that is not being considered ...


1

It could be a good design. A lot of times users would think an A/C temperature needed to be a specific number. The truth is that the A/C should be set to something comfortable. In an office environment this leads to people "fighting" over the A/C setting. It also leads people to set the setting when they are not supposed to. For example setting a dial to ...


1

I wouldn't do this for straight text. However the one situation where something like this is useful is in tables where one has to 'read across' a row of information: in this situation it's useful to alternate the visual style of the rows. This can be done either by using a different background colour to the horizontals of the row'grid' or can be done by ...


1

There are significant accessibility concerns in just using colors as visual indicators for users as colorblind users might struggle to differentiate different colors from one another making the app useless to them. To quote the WCAG guidelines Ensure that text and graphics are understandable when viewed without color. If color alone is used to ...


1

For the white train, you can outline the circle with gray (the circle itself would have white filling) and then your train would be outlined in gray. This way, you get your white background and the train is still visible. For black train lines, you can have the background circle black, with a white train.


1

The short answer is: Yes, color changes perception. But "better for the human brain" depends on what UX problem you're solving. What you are really asking is, "better for my UX" or "better for my brand". Non-natural colors can stimulate the brain in a positive way also...for example, take a look at the Google logo. I don't think the natural vs unnatural ...


1

It depends on the culture I would imagine. In modern, western cultures, words such as 'natural' or 'organic' conjure up pretty wholesome and positive associations. Even 'old fashioned' and 'traditional' are quite positive. I speak of words here but similar would apply to some extent with the associated colours. In emerging economies however, designs we may ...



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