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22

The instinct of whether to trust a site is affected by many different things, some of them conscious, some not. The decision of whether to trust will not be based entirely upon colour. There will be a multitude of cues that will help or hinder trust! Let's say that like in your example, the branding and colours used on the site are very much in tune with ...


17

Rather than RGB values, color perception is better represented as three alternative dimensions, one being darkness, and the other two being the color wheel. The other thing is that human perception does not linearly follow RGB values, so you have to apply some empirically determined transformations. Color differences are then proportional to the Euclidean ...


8

I depends on your target users, and the context you are using it in. There are no hard and fast rules about a specific colour being bad. For example, a dark colour for the website of a supermarket chain might give people pause for thought, but be perfectly fine for a site like thinkgeek. Blue - Tends to be used to indicate corporate websites, or online ...


6

Matching Brightness of Two Different Colors You can calculate the perceived gray-scale brightness of a color on a “typical” monitor with the following formula: Y = 0.2126 * (R/255)^2.2 + 0.7151 * (G/255)^2.2 + 0.0721 * (B/255)^2.2 So, for example, high saturation pure green (0, 255, 0) has a brightness of: Y = 0.2126 * (0/255)^2.2 + 0.7151 * ...


5

Color schemes, yes - individual colors, no! Since you know a lot of color impact on readability, specify three to five schemes your academic users can chose from. That way, they will appreciate your concern over their reading experience within well determined boundries. Leaving limited options to users is never wrong.


3

Isn't red usually associated to danger or to something you want to avoid as opposed to green? This would be a cultural interpretation of the color red. In China, it represents good luck and happiness (Wikipedia). You can see more about what different colors generally represent in different cultures in this Information is Beautiful Infograph: Colours ...


2

Taking the two examples you gave, there are two aspects to it. For the rotten tomato's example, since the percentage of rotten tomato's is an indicator of how highly rated a movie is, it makes to sense to use the color red as a visual indicator as its the same color as a tomato. So one of the reasons is the branding guidelines would also play a part The ...


2

It's definitely a good idea to include multiple colour schemes. As for your question on whether there's value and whether people will use it: For the first part, you might want to consider whether this feature falls into the list of must-haves or nice-to-haves in the overall scheme of your application and it's development. As you progress, move from the ...


2

XKCD have done an online survey asking users to name 5 million colours (across 222,500 user sessions). If you need to know what a huge sample of internet users think a colour is called, see: http://blog.xkcd.com/2010/05/03/color-survey-results/


2

A black website isn't a bad thing and I do not believe it will affect users' trust. I did a little research to verify my answers and I could find no articles that supported an argument for black negating a users trust. Most articles define black as a color that is used for luxury products. It also is used commonly for impulse buys. You can see the details of ...


1

For readability, it's necessary to have contrast, but not necessary and even detrimental to have too much contrast. Therefore grey background and black text, or white background and grey text (like #383838) is better than white and black. This question goes into more detail, top answer (as this is an internal link I'm not going to summarise (plagiarise lol) ...


1

I will take white content area for two reasons. Higher contrast between text and text area background. Grey background around text area make the text area optically raised. So the place for content will be more readily distinguishable.


1

Just ask this question to yourself -- "what would I recognize as a place to type in? A white box? Or a dark box?" Since you are talking about a textarea where user has to type something, it is good to leave the input area lighter..


1

The second example has less contrast between the text and the background. This will make the text harder to read than the first one. I would go for better readability.


1

I definitely agree with the previous statements regarding the need to be careful to not cause confusion about what is/is not a link. However, from a strictly accessibility standpoint, you would be best to focus on the contrast of the heading more so than the blue/not blue. To check to see if you have adequate contrast in place, you should check WEB AIM's ...


1

The best practice is to test everything, including this. What is pleasantly neutral or "in theme" with the site may be effectively invisible, or it may turn out that loud contrasts are unappealing. Split-test every choice you make in terms of design tweaks, and go with the one that gets the best results (conversions, order value, customer lifetime value, not ...


1

You could do one of the following: change contrast make it bigger add animations for dynamic color/contrast change If the button is really important, such attention grabbing mechanisms are okay.


1

Keeping in view one of Nielsen heuristic "Match between system and the real world". Red colour is perceived to be for ending anything in progress in real world, for example in tape recorders to stop recording stop button is used which have red dot or circle for identification. Similar, is the case with the televisions in which red colour identifies the ...



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