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11

It's quite an age old question in UX/Universal Design. But, with time I feel the importance diminishing. Some reasons maybe true globalization of products/brands/english language/etc. I know companies still have to rebrand their products based on the country the are launching in, but those cases are getting fewer. Once again, just a personal observation. ...


10

Color naming is an active field of research and has been for decades. See this example of work by the US National Bureau of Standards (NBS) from 1965. I include this reference only because it shows the length of time people have been thinking about this and that technology keeps making the problem fresh - notice the reference to reproducing the colors in ...


8

I think you are quite safe using the 147 html and css color names to communicate the correct color to users. It should be more than enough, but still colors based on W3C's standard.


8

The background you choose for your website has the power to set the theme and set the mood for your site at a glance. But the main aim of the background should be to enhance the visual experience and not to distract the user too much from the content. Analysis: The image with grey background has more depth and there is a sense that the content area is to ...


6

In western culture, red has a negative connotation (however for Japan this is the opposite). It is used as a warning or error, so using it as the primary option is a violation of the consistency principle (at least for most users). While cultural meaning might not be as important as it used to be, having consistent user interfaces is. Since most ...


6

This seems more of a graphic design question. That is, it seems you know you want green for authorization but need to know what shade of green (the graphic design bit). You can use a green that fits into your colour palette better. Say you took the pale blue and used the same lightness and saturation but changed only the hue to a green, you'd get something ...


6

It depends on the surrounding colors and how much you want to disrupt your users' attention. Red is generally associated with high level of alertness or "critical" warnings. However, it's used on many sites for neutral notifications because of the high contrast with the color of surrounding elements (many colors on SE, blue on Facebook, shades of gray on ...


6

Matching Brightness of Two Different Colors You can calculate the perceived gray-scale brightness of a color on a “typical” monitor with the following formula: Y = 0.2126 * (R/255)^2.2 + 0.7151 * (G/255)^2.2 + 0.0721 * (B/255)^2.2 So, for example, high saturation pure green (0, 255, 0) has a brightness of: Y = 0.2126 * (0/255)^2.2 + 0.7151 * ...


5

Color schemes, yes - individual colors, no! Since you know a lot of color impact on readability, specify three to five schemes your academic users can chose from. That way, they will appreciate your concern over their reading experience within well determined boundries. Leaving limited options to users is never wrong.


5

It makes no sense to consider a single color. You have to consider the color in its context. No one was ever stopped from drinking Coca-Cola because of the red in the logo. So long as the context and the surroundings are unknown, it is impossible to give an informed opinion on a choice of color.


4

There is a tool for checking color contrast in accordance to an specification by the W3C to determine if there's enough contrast "when viewed by someone having color deficits or when viewed on a black and white screen". This is a working draft but as close a standard as it gets in web. In this case, you should test the contrast between the different colors ...


3

Of course, this is why HSV and HSL color systems are typically plotted as cones, with the point of the cone at the extreme ends of lightness having less variation in hue and saturation (or chroma as it is labeled in the below image). (Image taken from Wikipedia.) Perceptual models based on psychological experiments don't tend to be this symmetric though. ...


3

Remember that colour shouldn't be the only way you communicate status. It possibly shouldn't even be the primary way: You should include some other depiction - an icon helps, as you've shown, but perhaps something more obviously 'authorizing' might be better. Not everyone can see in colour - particularly red vs green. Red/Green colour blindness affects ...


3

I understand why you greyed-out the active page: it should not need to be clickable because you're already on it. However, "greying out" is associated with something being inactive or not applicable. The problem is that your links serve 2 purposes: navigation, and feedback to the user what they are looking at right now. For this purpose, greying out is not ...


3

As a designer, red is considered to provoke the most response amongst users. However depending on how the color is used it can have positive or negative effects. Within my workplace the use of a navy blue color as a primary action button and a light grey color as a secondary button are practiced. These colors provide a balance to forms located throughout ...


3

Isn't red usually associated to danger or to something you want to avoid as opposed to green? This would be a cultural interpretation of the color red. In China, it represents good luck and happiness (Wikipedia). You can see more about what different colors generally represent in different cultures in this Information is Beautiful Infograph: Colours ...


2

There is no definitive answer to that question. There are so many things that are outside of your control and/or knowledge as a designer that you can't have a "rule" to say how far apart two RGB-color-values have to be. Some things to consider: Quality, type and settings (brightness and such) of your computer screen affect this a lot (check out Atwood's ...


2

The goal is to ensure easier reading when the user scans the site. Practicality aside, colour is obviously emotively persuasive. I would imagine that catering for the emotional well-being of your end users is as important allowing them to scan information easily. The grey you have chosen still provides a subtle contrast, partly because of the ...


2

There are measures you can take to work with web compatible color profiles as SteB mentioned, but the overal problem you're describing is generally an accepted downside to other people being able to view your document on their own screens. Most computer screens even fluctuate ever so slightly over time in regards to color, so even if you had the same model ...


2

There is no right color for your primary and secondary buttons. What does matter is how much contrast there is between the two. I believe that the color does have a huge significance in what you are trying to display to the user, however I do not believe that the exact hue or shade has an enormous significance as long as your UI is consistent throughout ...


2

If you're attempting to get a non-colorblind user's attention, yellow is actually the most attention grabbing color. Yellow is less associated with anger and frustration (although it is still sometimes associated with those feelings), it is generally shown to be a more positive color. Red does have more of an association with errors, and as @user12999 ...


2

The contrast between colors is more imporant. See the work of Ethan Schoonover, on the Solarized palette.


2

There has been a research project at the National Technical University of Athens where researchers found that the background colour has no significant effect on the perception of map markers etc. However, the colour of lines, markers, etc had a significant effect on the perception of the map. I have seen a copy of the research but I couldn't find it on the ...


2

In a web application I think tabs are the best option for this. Using correct light/dark colour scheme will give users feedback immediately which one is active.


2

It's definitely a good idea to include multiple colour schemes. As for your question on whether there's value and whether people will use it: For the first part, you might want to consider whether this feature falls into the list of must-haves or nice-to-haves in the overall scheme of your application and it's development. As you progress, move from the ...


2

Taking the two examples you gave, there are two aspects to it. For the rotten tomato's example, since the percentage of rotten tomato's is an indicator of how highly rated a movie is, it makes to sense to use the color red as a visual indicator as its the same color as a tomato. So one of the reasons is the branding guidelines would also play a part The ...


1

Another possible option is to use a filter to accomplish this. The list is normally filtered to show only their clients, but in those cases where they want to see all clients, they would turn off the filtering you've kindly provided for them. A filtering control might communicate its use more readily than the affordance issue you've run into with a ...


1

I definitely agree with the previous statements regarding the need to be careful to not cause confusion about what is/is not a link. However, from a strictly accessibility standpoint, you would be best to focus on the contrast of the heading more so than the blue/not blue. To check to see if you have adequate contrast in place, you should check WEB AIM's ...


1

The best practice is to test everything, including this. What is pleasantly neutral or "in theme" with the site may be effectively invisible, or it may turn out that loud contrasts are unappealing. Split-test every choice you make in terms of design tweaks, and go with the one that gets the best results (conversions, order value, customer lifetime value, not ...


1

You could do one of the following: change contrast make it bigger add animations for dynamic color/contrast change If the button is really important, such attention grabbing mechanisms are okay.



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