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35

Yes, it's bad design for its lack of signifiers (signs in the world that offer guidance). You can't distinguish what device it belongs to by just looking at it. You can't know its purpose without trying it out. It does't show its state clearly. Could we establish a clear relationship between one state and one temperature easily and consistently? I don't ...


25

The instinct of whether to trust a site is affected by many different things, some of them conscious, some not. The decision of whether to trust will not be based entirely upon colour. There will be a multitude of cues that will help or hinder trust! Let's say that like in your example, the branding and colours used on the site are very much in tune with ...


18

Rather than RGB values, color perception is better represented as three alternative dimensions, one being darkness, and the other two being the color wheel. The other thing is that human perception does not linearly follow RGB values, so you have to apply some empirically determined transformations. Color differences are then proportional to the Euclidean ...


16

Yes, Use of grey scale for depicting temperature is not at all a good idea. The photograph shows clearly the change in intensity as the knob moves from white to grey. But it doesn't communicate the purpose of intensity, specially knowing that this knob is for adjusting the temperature, I think they got it all wrong. A simple color depiction would have ...


14

Color naming is an active field of research and has been for decades. See this example of work by the US National Bureau of Standards (NBS) from 1965. I include this reference only because it shows the length of time people have been thinking about this and that technology keeps making the problem fresh - notice the reference to reproducing the colors in ...


12

I think you are quite safe using the 147 html and css color names to communicate the correct color to users. It should be more than enough, but still colors based on W3C's standard.


12

It's quite an age old question in UX/Universal Design. But, with time I feel the importance diminishing. Some reasons maybe true globalization of products/brands/english language/etc. I know companies still have to rebrand their products based on the country the are launching in, but those cases are getting fewer. Once again, just a personal observation. ...


8

The background you choose for your website has the power to set the theme and set the mood for your site at a glance. But the main aim of the background should be to enhance the visual experience and not to distract the user too much from the content. Analysis: The image with grey background has more depth and there is a sense that the content area is to ...


8

I depends on your target users, and the context you are using it in. There are no hard and fast rules about a specific colour being bad. For example, a dark colour for the website of a supermarket chain might give people pause for thought, but be perfectly fine for a site like thinkgeek. Blue - Tends to be used to indicate corporate websites, or online ...


7

The attribute you are looking for is “relative luminance,” L, which, for a standard monitor, can be calculated as: L = 0.2126 * Rg + 0.7152 * Gg + 0.0722 * Bg, Where Rg, Gg and Bg are R, G, B values transformed as follows: if R <= 10 then Rg = R/3294, else Rg = (R/269 + 0.0513)^2.4 if G <= 10 then Gg = G/3294, else Gg = (G/269 + ...


6

In western culture, red has a negative connotation (however for Japan this is the opposite). It is used as a warning or error, so using it as the primary option is a violation of the consistency principle (at least for most users). While cultural meaning might not be as important as it used to be, having consistent user interfaces is. Since most ...


6

This seems more of a graphic design question. That is, it seems you know you want green for authorization but need to know what shade of green (the graphic design bit). You can use a green that fits into your colour palette better. Say you took the pale blue and used the same lightness and saturation but changed only the hue to a green, you'd get something ...


6

It depends on the surrounding colors and how much you want to disrupt your users' attention. Red is generally associated with high level of alertness or "critical" warnings. However, it's used on many sites for neutral notifications because of the high contrast with the color of surrounding elements (many colors on SE, blue on Facebook, shades of gray on ...


6

Matching Brightness of Two Different Colors You can calculate the perceived gray-scale brightness of a color on a “typical” monitor with the following formula: Y = 0.2126 * (R/255)^2.2 + 0.7151 * (G/255)^2.2 + 0.0721 * (B/255)^2.2 So, for example, high saturation pure green (0, 255, 0) has a brightness of: Y = 0.2126 * (0/255)^2.2 + 0.7151 * ...


5

It makes no sense to consider a single color. You have to consider the color in its context. No one was ever stopped from drinking Coca-Cola because of the red in the logo. So long as the context and the surroundings are unknown, it is impossible to give an informed opinion on a choice of color.


5

Color schemes, yes - individual colors, no! Since you know a lot of color impact on readability, specify three to five schemes your academic users can chose from. That way, they will appreciate your concern over their reading experience within well determined boundries. Leaving limited options to users is never wrong.


5

Combining the answer by @pzw and the original knop, referring a bit to @AntonioMarquis : we don't have to mix the colors to get the idea of 'temparature' across. These knobs might, indeed, be hiding in dark places, so let's keep a fair amount of contrast in the graphics. Just adding some (solid) color would do the trick. I also chose light blue instead of ...


4

There is a tool for checking color contrast in accordance to an specification by the W3C to determine if there's enough contrast "when viewed by someone having color deficits or when viewed on a black and white screen". This is a working draft but as close a standard as it gets in web. In this case, you should test the contrast between the different colors ...


4

Isn't red usually associated to danger or to something you want to avoid as opposed to green? This would be a cultural interpretation of the color red. In China, it represents good luck and happiness (Wikipedia). You can see more about what different colors generally represent in different cultures in this Information is Beautiful Infograph: Colours ...


3

Of course, this is why HSV and HSL color systems are typically plotted as cones, with the point of the cone at the extreme ends of lightness having less variation in hue and saturation (or chroma as it is labeled in the below image). (Image taken from Wikipedia.) Perceptual models based on psychological experiments don't tend to be this symmetric though. ...


3

Remember that colour shouldn't be the only way you communicate status. It possibly shouldn't even be the primary way: You should include some other depiction - an icon helps, as you've shown, but perhaps something more obviously 'authorizing' might be better. Not everyone can see in colour - particularly red vs green. Red/Green colour blindness affects ...


3

I understand why you greyed-out the active page: it should not need to be clickable because you're already on it. However, "greying out" is associated with something being inactive or not applicable. The problem is that your links serve 2 purposes: navigation, and feedback to the user what they are looking at right now. For this purpose, greying out is not ...


3

As a designer, red is considered to provoke the most response amongst users. However depending on how the color is used it can have positive or negative effects. Within my workplace the use of a navy blue color as a primary action button and a light grey color as a secondary button are practiced. These colors provide a balance to forms located throughout ...


3

XKCD have done an online survey asking users to name 5 million colours (across 222,500 user sessions). If you need to know what a huge sample of internet users think a colour is called, see: http://blog.xkcd.com/2010/05/03/color-survey-results/


3

As @laurendankiewicz proposed, you can use outlined icon, like pictured: But I think you also need to consider: You shouldn't use color code as the only mean to convey information for accessibility reasons. You could use tools like NoCoffee vision simulator to assess it If the color of the line is important information for a user, it's better to ...


3

F.lux has some information that may be relevant to this situation. F.lux is a software that overlays your desktop screen and adjusts colors depending on the time of day to make it easier on the eyes. f.lux research Blue Light Affects Sleep (and here's why) We know that night-time exposure to blue light keeps people up late. We believe that f.lux ...


3

I think you're a bit confused here. HSL stands for Hue, Saturation, Lightness. If you need to know white= 100% Lightness. So the opposite to white is still L, only that at 0% (thus if you use any value for H and S, then add 0% for the L value, you'll get black). You can see the w3 recommendations with examples here As for HSV, it's a bit more complex, ...


3

According to the WCAG 2.0 web accessibility standards, the contrast for a text and background color should be a ratio of at least 4.5:1. Their checker shows your current background colors as being too light. I have taken screenshots of the differences: There is not enough contrast between the background color and the text. If the eye has to ...


2

There is no definitive answer to that question. There are so many things that are outside of your control and/or knowledge as a designer that you can't have a "rule" to say how far apart two RGB-color-values have to be. Some things to consider: Quality, type and settings (brightness and such) of your computer screen affect this a lot (check out Atwood's ...


2

The goal is to ensure easier reading when the user scans the site. Practicality aside, colour is obviously emotively persuasive. I would imagine that catering for the emotional well-being of your end users is as important allowing them to scan information easily. The grey you have chosen still provides a subtle contrast, partly because of the ...



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