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7

Amazing how I've never thought about this 'conundrum' before, but it's intriguing. Here are the possible solutions I could come up with: Two menu buttons My first thought was to put the sub nav off-canvas to the left. Leaving you with a menu button on the right for a dropdown menu of the main nav and a menu button on the left for the off-canvas sub nav. But ...


6

If your intention is to reduce the reduced sidepanel real estate to zero, there's really very few options available in terms of design patterns. The question simply becomes 'where do you put the button' For example, The Opera Desktop Browser has a button at the bottom left, in the status bar which toggles the visibility of the panel: Other positions ...


5

When designing an interface, you should focus on making it as easy to use as you can, not on doing something new for the sake of it. And as your question stands you haven't really shown what the problem with checkboxes is that you are going to solve with icons and colours. So breaking it down with specific reasons: Checkboxes clearly indicate their state ...


4

I always go by the rule Chapter is to Tab. Paragraph is to Collapsible Panel. When you have 2 hierarchies, the broader of the two levels are tabs and the other ought to be for collapsible panels. For complex applications, there are more than 3 levels. Whatever you do, don't implement the same UI division to the next immediate generation. This means that if ...


3

One solution would be to collapse the Primary Nav, as you currently have planned and to simply stack the secondary nav items. The reason for this approach is given that there will be numerous actions involved in most of those items such as text input, dropdowns, saving, etc., you'll want to make use of the little real estate you have available, but yet ...


3

Three typical options: You can teach the user a command key that displays all the panels, overlaying everything else, and then disappearing when the command is pressed again. Adobe suite does this. You can also consider giving access to these assortment of panels through a Pie menu. This is what is used by Alias for their Maya product. It requires a ...


3

Based on the images you have displayed and the issue you are having, I would suggest showing the charts upfront to the user "if" your users are expected to have a level of knowledge, that the charts would make self on its own. If the your users, might not understand the overall concept of the chart, show the data upfront instead. I would then remove the ...


2

The triangle expander control you are referencing here is described by Microsoft in their Progressive Disclosure Controls Guidelines. This particular control is the only one that displays in it's Present State (as opposed to the 'future state' i.e. the state it will be in when selected) this is because it (apparently) resembles a rotating lever so shows the ...


2

I would not use a treeview. (A) Use HEADLINE 1.1 and HEADLINE 1.2 as a headline with the option "EXPAND ALL". Below you placed the tree with the collapsible SUBHEADERS. (B) There are too many elements then you can also split the tree in 2 views (first is a list and second a tree).


2

Having so many tabs that the user must scroll horizontally is never a good idea. It's very fiddly and breaks the tab analogy. I would only use tabs if the number of tabs was predictable and limited. If your user can create a large number or theoretically infinite number of items, I think a vertical list (scrolling if necessary) would be more appropriate.


2

I think there are a few things you can do to improve this within the activity stream itself (examples loosely based on sharing amongst users, but the principles are the same): Group notifications together by type and time then output one item to the activity stream. So a user adds 20 pictures, that would be one notification 'X added 20 pictures'. This ...


2

Providing too much information with matrix view, as in your panel, makes it hard to process it. The reason is there is conflict of view patterns: per-row or per-column. So there could be a risk of loosing eye-view path, see the image. You could see how Amazon organizes information for its hudge number of servers: Source . Source So, per-row view with ...


2

Based on the screenshots, I assume when you say collapsible panels you mean drop-downs or drop-lists. Here's a research article about tabs by NNGroup: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/tabs-used-right/ Summary: 13 design guidelines for tab controls are all followed by Yahoo Finance, but usability suffers from AJAX overkill and difficult customization. ...


2

In terms of a cleaner, more modern UI this seems like a good idea, but the problem is most users are not used to modern UI's as much as we want them to be. This type of interaction is not obvious to the user and without guidance they will, Not notice the button at all. Users who notice will not know what it does. If you're keen on removing the label, ...


2

Both tabs and collapsible panels are ways of grouping controls. Both have advantages and disadvantages. Advantages of tabs Easy to understand, easily discoverable, widespread and thus likely to be recognized by users of other products Less cluttering because only the contents of one tab is visible at any point in time, separating each group of controls ...


1

Collapsible panels are more valuable when combinations of settings from various panels are important. If settings are totally orthogonal or independent - that is, the settings from one group don't affect the settings from another group - then tabs are fine (and so are any other ways of showing/hiding groups of settings). If the settings from various groups ...


1

The way I would approach this is to slightly rethink everything. For instance, if I were designing it, before a node has been selected I would have the node selector fill the entire working area. Then, when a node has been selected, the node selector would collapse into narrowness and fade into the background like in the Spotify web app. In this example, I ...


1

A combination of the following: Consider moving the tree to the right side of the screen. if the user frequently shows and hides the tree, the content of the work area always moves around. If the tree is on the right, it will only cover the right half of the work area, but the "most important" elements of the content area remain in place. Make "Select ...


1

OK, this is my first answer at UX, so bear with me, but my approach would be this: PROBLEM 1) You need to have that sidebar menu 2) You need to have a "content" or "canvas" area which will be sub-divided in 2 vertical halves. 3) You'd like to have some space in this "canvas" PROPOSED SOLUTION With this in mind, I think your best bet would be to hide/show ...


1

Many elements, such as light-boxes, will close if you detect a click outside of your box. One simple way to do that: toggle a bool on mouseenter and mouseleave and then on click do if(!InPanel) closePane(); This is my primary suggestion. I think depending on the purpose of the panel, the user will sometimes want to scroll down the page to view something ...


1

I think you should use option A, since in this case, the radio button has a higher hierarchy than the triangle. Leave some space between the radio button and the triangle so that the triangle and the title are grouped as a whole element.


1

First of all I would propose looking at the sequence of your users. Does he need to read all three (or more) of the panels to make a decision? If so, wouldn't it be more practical for it to be expanded all the time? I can imagine having to expand every item and reading through it carefully can be a pain. If it isn't then I would say look at the flow of the ...


1

Whether to use tabs or collapsible panels comes down to how people use your software, or how you want them to use it. If you can figure out likely workflows and you can group your functions intelligently, then you can maximize usability using a well-placed combination of tabs and collapsible panels. Collapsible panels are great when you're able to use them ...


1

Slide over page content Vs. Push down the page content to revel panel Hiding content is generally not good. You are deciding that VM list is "less important" then the other content, by hiding it, until a use clicks on it at which point it is the "most important" thing. Which is it? If it isn't important enough to show right away then you should not ...



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