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14

If the war room is for making a tight deadline, then I'd say the comment from @Roger-Attrill is perfect. Especially the coffee. Don't forget the coffee. However, if it's used for brainstorm sessions, there might be some other components you can use for an effective and most of all creative brainstorm session. Make sure people inside the room don't get ...


10

Are they? Often, no. Should they be? YES! As should be content folks, product owners, project managers, marketing (as much as we loathe them), IT, customer support, etc. In other words, the best UX is UX that permeates all teams involved with the project. I strongly believe that UX should be much more of a methodology and philosophy more than it should ...


7

Absolutely, though the degree to which developers are involved depends on the scale of the project. Some of us (like me, currently) do all development, UI design and UX work on projects. This is common for smaller businesses or internal apps, and it's pretty much unavoidable. In large projects, Developers aren't nearly as integrated into the UX; they're ...


5

In describing a place where "where they sit and and brainstorm" the term think tank is perhaps more appropriate. The term war room originated as a term to describe the command and control center to wage a real war. The English war rooms that Churchill used in World War II are an example. A key characteristic of any war room is the need to keep all ...


5

I think you're looking at one really good example here on ux.stackeachange.com - where players in a given space are given tools to not only add value, but to have the ranking or their value democratically monitored and adjusted by the community. Essentially there are 3 motivations in the game space that stem from the "I'm Awesome" perspective: Personal ...


5

We built an online game last year targeted at middle and primary school students with the goal of helping them learn maths. The idea was that they would challenge each other to answer math questions. Much of the design was inspired by StackOverflow. Some principles we used: Competition inspires collaboration. In games like New Super Mario Bros. Wii, ...


4

In a small fast paced agency ...waterfall doesn't work too well. Which you've experienced first hand. ;) Agile is the way to go. Be it formal, or completely informal. The ultimate goal in either case is to get out of the 'step by step' mentality of wireframes -> visual design -> development. The best way to get out of that is to make sure all 3 ...


3

The one constant reason for either brainstorm or war room being successful or not has always been the facilitator, in my experience at least. This is the hardest job, this person needs to be able to sense where the discussion and keep everyone on task, keep the momentum going and also have a really good feel for when to let people go off on tangents and ...


3

It seems to me this is what the web was designed for. A website could be created that presents the assets in any kind of organization you want. Links would point to the asset files no matter their format, maybe along side a summary or some metadata. If the format of the asset file is not presentable by the browser the browser will facilitate downloading. ...


2

Some thoughts of mine: With Lean UX and other agile methods you have to work together as team. Especially with the agile methodology developers have a very crucial role in the process. Developers will eventually build the product, not UX. Most often management will hold them responsible for the deadline, costs, quality etc. So I think it's good they can ...


2

Its important to get developers' feedback as early as possible in design discussions to avoid redesign later. Different development teams will inevitably have some strengths and some limitations.. for e.g. expertise with a particular UI library. In fact, involving them early can actually help the UX team in leveraging their strengths. Generally, there will ...


2

We've been using a method called Design Studio, which has been introduced by Todd Zaki Warfel. It has been used in various forms in other design processes. The key part to the process is involving the whole project team in the process of designing, that's UX, designers and development. It uses rapid iterations of the design where each member of the team ...


2

Whatever the official position the developers have to make it happen. If they cannot see the rationale behind decisions, they may well implement them badly. If they understand what the UX is trying to do, they may suggest changes or modifications that will make the build process easier, the performance better, and the UX no worse. I am a developer, I should ...


2

Well in the UK there are various attempts. http://www.data.gov.uk/ is the main one as they are trying to open up the government data. All statistical data is posted here by www.statistics.gov.uk. The UKSA is responsibile for all statistical data from government, but how it all work is stupidly complex. Tim (I invented the internet) Bernes Lee is important ...


2

I learned the following from this: Ordering threads by last reply on top will overwhelm you with replies to threads you are not interested in. Ordering threads by last thread on top, causes you to miss replies to messages you are interested in. Luckily we already have the concept of notifications. A notification is generated according to the following ...


1

I've had several gigs where the teams are heavily dispersed throughout the globe. That said, even when designers and developers are across the hall from each other, the same challenges exist. In general, I suggestion: Reduce Documentation as much as possible The biggest burden is heavy documentation. Wireframes, design specs, sample code, content ...


1

Marty Cagan, on his product management blog and in his book, makes a very strong case for high fidelity prototypes, because using them… forces you to think through your product to a much greater degree than paper specs, enables and encourages the type of collaboration between product manager, interaction designer, and architect/engineer that is ...


1

You could look into UXenterprise from HFI, specifically designed for UX professionals, which precisely addresses this issue and has more features too. UXenterprise helps with storing all the objects that you would typically use in a UX process, best part since the process is very iterative, its got a versioning feature, that lets you go back to that version ...


1

What should one consider to increase usability in general when launching a wikipedia-esque site? To increase User Experience of any site, wiki or non-wiki, look for theese first two important statements that you have to answer before you start. You might even find that a Wiki isn't the best suited framework for your Site objectives and User needs. What ...


1

We have used a mix of software tools and video-conferencing to do this with our geographically-distributed team (though not across oceans, just continents, for us): A wiki for notes, sketches, screen shots, photos of whiteboards, and discussion. This is pretty asynchronous. Discussion threads can get hard to follow, so somebody has to curate this from ...


1

This is a really good question. I think War Rooms are a huge benefit to any project especially when people outside of UX are also using it (business line managers, developers, IT, marketing, etc). I've rarely seen it implemented well in a physical shared room, so it's likely going to be a challenge online. One option that comes to mind is 37Signals ...


1

Often, the source of strife within a team comes from miscommunication and misunderstandings between team members that can be solved or at least improved through talking to each other. A few things to consider: Are all team members involved in the process? Is everyone's opinion asked? Even though the role of a certain team member is to do design does not ...


1

[This is CW - to promote collaboration] Summary Quests can promote collaboration. Giving badges more visibility than numbers can promote collaboration. Framing writing as improving a larger document rather than replacement of a smaller document promotes collaboration. Access-Rights are an important form of reward. Collaborative Subgoals WoW has ...



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