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12

As a programmer, I prefer the line breaking to happen at the boundaries of words (assuming your assessment that line breaking is needed is correct). However, I would change the way you break. Instead of continuing at column 0, I think you should continue at the same column as the line you are breaking, and you should indicate somehow that it is not a real ...


6

I would suggest adding drag handles on each block and let the user decide the ordering. You'll only need to ensure that no matter the order of blocks, the first block will always be an if block and the remaining blocks- else if. Refer the image for more details This way the user will come to know upfront that the blocks are drag-able, both on desktop as ...


6

For replacements I always prefer to use double square brackets with natural language: Hello, [[first name]] Double brackets rarely appear in normal text but are easy to type and read, natural language removes the need to know/lookup field names. Alternatively you can use real data with highlighting and some tool-tips, bit trickier to implement but much ...


6

Breaking up words/names is a bad idea for the simple reason that it's hard to tell where the function name begins and where it ends. Names can be abstract which makes them even more difficult for the brain to stitch back together. The first just feels more natural and although still difficult to read, you quickly can understand that text is wrapping and ...


6

There are UX designers that can also create great icons. There are UX designers that can also write JavaScript. There are UX designers that can whip out SQL queries on demand. And then there are UX designers that don't do any of that. Point being, there is no one template for being a UX designer. Having a well-rounded set of extra skills is certainly a ...


4

Convention (in whatever context you're working in) trumps all. Whatever your working group has decided upon should be observed. If you're in the process of determining coding conventions there's plenty of good anecdotal, language specific, advice available on the internet. I know of no studies that suggest a specific coding style is easier to read than ...


4

You need to know enough in the technology you are designing for to be able to estimate the effort for developing each of the alternative designs you might consider. As a UX designer, you are the person who negotiates with the users the way their interface will look like. The users will always push for what they imagine will fit their needs, plus eye candy. ...


3

All other answers suggest drag handles, but I suggest against that. The problem with drag handles is that: you ask the user to move a block from one position to a specific area. If he misses the area, errors can easily occur. if the block you're moving is too high, the travel distance can become cumbersome. it can be hard to implement drag handles suggest ...


3

One option is to set a minimum width on the code container and let the user scroll horizontally. Code that wraps unexpectedly is confusing at best, and in languages like Python it will appear completely broken. (This would be overflow-x: auto or scroll on the code element's parent in CSS.) 80 monospaced characters is often the default line length.


3

Pursue the activities that make you most happy (and successful). Then seek clients/employers that have needs best suited to your interests. Its a two-way street and you'll also want to look for support in areas you'd like to grow or improve. For instance, someone with deep research background might do well with larger companies with many specialized roles, ...


3

I have never heard of any wrapping algorithm that would break up words on anything but syllables (or soft hyphens). So breaking up a words at any arbitrary character is certainly not advisable. For programmers words in code are identifiers or operators etc. They only have meaning as a whole. So in this contexts even breaking up on syllables is ill-advised.


2

Make a toggle: Linebreak [yes] or [no]. Depending on the programming language being displayed, inserted linebreaks will alter the execution of the code. Once you do break the code onto a new line, indicate this by adding the linebreak character at the end of the line. With a toggle you will be able to give the user of your application the option of making ...


2

I know the good way of wrapping for humans, including developers. The first way. You don't break words. If you do break words, they are not readable anymore. When reaching the wrap point, you may make it clearer that the line continues, by putting at the right a symbol like an arrow ⤶. Nice text editors do that.


2

My answer will not be complete - bits and pieces really, I just want to hint at two aspects that I feel are worth not overlooking. (As I noted in comments, I've shared a few thoughts on the subject before - here). When I scan code I usually look at the left side of the screen and expect control flow statements to appear there so it is possible to ...


2

Mailchimp uses and icon to indicate the draggability of the block. Google uses drag handles in Gmail, they appear on hover. Using an icon (any icon) or drag handles to indicate the object is draggable are both good solutions, but it all comes down to the affordance of the solutions. When showing it to your user, will they understand it's meaning? One ...


1

I would do as you suggested and use up / down arrows on the if blocks as well as the individual conditions in case the user wanted to swap any of those as well. You can also make the arrows aware of their position by enabling / disabling them based on whether they can move their item up or down or not. Based on your image, here's what it could look like: ...


1

When I do lists of orderable elements, I try to avoid drag handles but only becuase they are fiddly with smaller UI elements in my case. Instead I implement Move Up and Move Down buttons on buttons or a context area (or both). The downside of directly replacing drag handles with buttons is that the user needs to reposition the mouse after each move action. ...


1

If I had to solve this problem, I would have combined two different ways to do it : Enabling the user to drag blocks to change their position. When one block is selected, using the arrows of the keyboard to change their position. I think that it's interesting to combine different ways to do something, so you could also display the arrows you was speaking ...


1

I have two answers for this question: 1- 3-30-300 second of finding an information (how to deal with information that can grow) Showing all the functions with a search bar is a must (clustering them can make it easier). Secondly these findings should be explained in a summarized way. If user wants to take more information and details about the same ...


1

These are some personal requests that hit my mind while reading your question and might or mightn't be liked by every other coder. Keep in mind what kind of coder will use your product esp. what code language and for what s/he is programming for (target). Navigation. Provide some sort of keyboard-only navigation in general. But especially when jumping ...


1

I can't answer about any usefulness in sense of code, but there surely can be some methods to improve code for perception. You should simply think about the code as the written product, that is read by human user (i.e. another programer or someone else), so among others, answer yourself to these questions: Who is the reader of code? Is it you, the author? ...


1

While there's no definitive answer, reading code is still reading just like any other text and some guidelines indicate that 50-75 characters per line is a good number for English. The cognitive load of code is often far higher per line than it is in English so you probably want to err on the shorter side. I haven't seen any research on the specific column ...


1

The technology you will need to master as a UI expert will depend on the types of interfaces you'll be working on. There are several main platforms, with varying requirements: Mobile /Tablets Desktop software Web apps and sites Consider even deeper specializations... just within web design you could have: Transactional shopping Communities Web ...


1

Of course, they would prefer you to be able to do all the (visual) design (research) work and be able to implement it pixel perfectly as well ;) However, my experience so far in this field is that most UX'ers have one or two specializations (say: design and psychology, or computer science and design, etc.) and have broadened their horizons into the other ...


1

I would just fold "Add New" into the dropdown. You can also do without a separate preset management interface. The below approach eliminates need for dedicated "Edit" "add" "Save" buttons just for that field. Good luck! download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


1

Make it easy. In most of the custom built CMS projects that we do for my clients, their users have a very limited technical understanding, but not necessarily technical programming skills. Some of the different things we've done over the years: If you make the site interact with the user and try to autofill or provide suggestions based on the "code" ...


1

Boy is this a rock and a hard place. Definitely keep words intact. No programmer is going to like this (as is already clear), too much info is being removed by the indentation being mucked up. Breaking words doesn't solve this and it does add other problems. To make the best of a bad situation you need to clearly delineate lines. Your examples use zebra ...



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