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Open vs close questions Children Here an advice you'd find sometimes with child education: It is better to provide a child with a specific set of options, instead of leaving it to them to work out the options themselves. For example, instead of asking your child "What would you like to eat?" ask her "Would you like an omelette or rice?". The ...


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Typically these kind of text-based (command line) workflows will have prompts, a la (y/n)?, that make it pretty clear what the application expects. I would say to stick with this familiar pattern. Under the hood you could account for case differences or complete spelling of Yes or No (just look at the first letter), but I wouldn't take that too far ...


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If possible I suppose it would probably be user friendly to give at least a suggestion of what answers are expected / accepted. This could be as little as [y/n]. Otherwise after my opinion you would probably run the risk that users wouldn't answer at all since we're so used to clicking buttons. But that might of course depend on the context, the type of ...


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I would generally say it depends whether which of the following is more important: Make it easier/faster to proceed Stop the user proceeding accidentally If 1 then go for your second option, if 2 then go for your first option. Regardless of which one you pick, provided you stick to the same throughout your application then I would say it doesn't matter. ...


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There's often an argument over whether the top right or top left is more intuitive, but I've always found that people used to the close button on the top left find that more intuitive, and people used to the close button on the top right find that more intuitive. Historically the top left option came first with the Apple Lisa (1983), and windows then ...


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Here are the main reasons why the top right corner is the most intuitive place for a close button: A close button controls the whole window, so it should be in the title bar for that window (clearly separated from content). This is normally along the top. Any button that takes you out of a screen (including close) should follow the "next" button ...


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This is where you have to consider the market of users the app/website is directed toward. In Pretty much most cases though, you go with top right. The reason for that is because more people use Windows than Mac and those who use Mac know that generally close button is in the top right corner. Remember where are you looking for the close button when you ...


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Imagine you were shopping and whenever you tried to leave a store, one of the sales people blocked your way until you had told them that you weren't interested in what the store had to offer and were sure that you wanted to leave. That is the real world equivalent of popping anything up when a user tries to leave a site. The one exception is if the person ...


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I feel that what you're asking is a best practise for a UX Dark Pattern. With someone leaving the site, we should not be annoying them to register to a newsletter. It can leave a very bad impression on your users, especially the ones who did not find the site helpful. Discounts, Surveys and Newsletter can all be part of the page as a bonus. With that said, ...



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