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57

Some facts: The image below is from the article How Do Users Really Hold Mobile Devices?. You can find plenty of other articles on the web about how users use a mobile phone. The data was collected by observing thousands of mobile phone owners remotely. Dark Orange / Red - percentage of people who use their phone using thumb alone Violet - Percentage of ...


37

People sometimes just close the confirmation/warning dialogs without reading the content. Removing the [X] button will somehow force the users to read the message in order to know whether to press [yes] or [cancel]. This is of course the purpose of a modal dialog and it would seem the right thing to do. This may cause frustration for users that are in a ...


32

The major mobile touch screen operating systems (iOS, Windows Phone 7, Android) don't trouble the user with "closing" applications in the way that desktop applications do. This simplifies the experience, making applications appear seamlessly built into the operating system. Typically, applications on these operating systems will "pause" when the user ...


21

Do always provide an X-Button unless you really need a distinct answer. Most people assume that clicking the X gets them back where they started without the need to answer the probably confusing question of the application. Most users who understand what they just did will choose an option, all others might click the X, that's my experience. See this ...


20

Let's evaluate the scenarios Users expect clicking on menu to close If it closes on menu clicking => good Whether it closes touching outside or not=> don't care, because they'll use the button. Moreover most people won't be expecting a toggeable component to remain open when you click outside it and even if someone expect this, redoing the action ...


19

I would recommend going with the close button for the following reasons Your close button is a visual indicator to users that they can click there to close the popover. While some users might be accustomed to clicking outside or pressing ESC to close a popover (and you should support those users too), the close button helps establish the escape route.To ...


19

I recognize that the web leads to its own problems because it is platform independent, but if most of your visitors are Windows users than using Windows standards might make sense. Here is one page from Microsoft on UI design. User testing would really be the best option in this scenario. This may be common knowledge to everyone here but I'd recommend the ...


18

X has never meant exit, but there's a reason for the confusion X has historically been overloaded to mean two different things: Delete an item. For example: Close or Dismiss a window. This is not the same as exiting an app but historically, hitting the X button almost always resulted in an application exiting, so that is why users sometime confuse ...


17

It may be redundant, but independently of this the real concern should be to evaluate if this redundancy is beneficial, harmful or neutral. Different goals, different designs Do you need a confirmation modal or just an informative one? Confirmation: To start with you'd need a OK/Cancel pattern which will offer a clear binary option. You could avoid the X ...


16

A cross should always be used to close something. The problem is the meaning of closing. One thing is for sure, closing is not the same as minimizing. Your example for Skype in Windows is not correct. Close button closes the window, while the minimize window button minimizes the window, but doesn't close it. Therefore they don't do the same. On Mac OS, ...


16

If you're going to use a hamburger menu, then it should collapse when you click or tap elsewhere (on desktop too, if the menu sticks instead of responds to unhover). Also on mobile other elements should not be activated when tapping off the menu. But I think the correct answer, providing the best UX—which is your real goal, isn't it?—is: don't use a ...


12

I believe this application (Skype) and many other communication type applications including instant-messengers, email clients and other VOIP apps, hi-jack the "X" button to minimize the more user-frustrating event of accidentally ending a users communication session. In many cases, users might simply want to get the application of the screen, the fastest and ...


12

The [x] buttons on windows is meant to close the window. A [Close] button is meant to close the window. So, yes, they are meant to do the same thing. The operation of closing a window in some cases (a) closes the app, (b) in some cases minimizes the app (or hides it altogether) and (c) in some cases closes only that window. Examples: (a) A single ...


12

It means Close. Skype’s is a poor design. Use the correct button for your use-case. If your program cannot be closed, or at least non-trivially, don’t display an X at all, or disable the button. Replace it with _, which is the icon used for minimizing. Hindering attempts to close your software makes you look awful This behavior is one strongly associated ...


11

Although it has become quite common that overlays close on an outside click, it brings some usability flaws if you don't offer the close button: Users that are new to the internet might be confused or feel lost when they can't find the close button (my mother, for example) On (some android (?)) tablets, these overlays still don‘t seem to work really well, ...


9

Use workflow analysis to figure it out Think about the user's workflow for a popup. A typical workflow might be: User sees something onscreen User wants to find out more, and presses a popup trigger Popup is displayed User re-orients vision to the popup, and reads the popup title. User may close the popup after the title (if it's not useful ...


8

It's probably not necessary, that is becoming more and more of a standard for overlays. But if it does become a problem with users, it won't hurt to put a little 'x' in the top right corner - it's out of the way and everyone understands that is close.


8

The hamburger "menu" belongs to the menu class of UI patterns. therefor if you look how menus behave, they close in both instances when the user clicks/touches it again or somewhere outside its hit area. The same would apply to hamburger menus as well.


7

The cancel button is usually used for something the user called. if the dialog is a missclick, the user might just want to press the red x at the top since thats the first thing his eyes see when wanting to get out of an operation. pressing [x] is like being asked a question and answering "no comment" and going away. if thats not a possibility in your ...


6

Skype, being a peer-to-peer telecoms application, works much like BitTorrent and other P2P distribution methods by relying on users' own machines and internet connections to route the traffic of other people's calls. This means that, as a Skype user, your machine is being used to facilitate other people's connections even when you aren't making a call ...


6

I would definitely go with top right, because more people use windows than mac, and those who use mac, just like you, know that generally close button is in the top right corner. Remember where are you looking for the close button when you get a layer pop-up in a browser window?


6

They requested I add a "Exit with Saving" and "Exit without Saving" button to our existing toolbar which would bypass the prompt. (get rid of the "extra click") The entire purpose of that dialog is to create an extra click! In situations where the user could lose work, you have to protect against an accidental click. This is where the Save/Don't ...


6

This is an old element inherited since Windows 3.1 where the interface of the applications didn't have the, now common, "X" to close them. Before, on the top right there was a menu that you could access with the combination Alt+space and one of the options, the main one, was close. The double click basically activates the main option of that menu. At some ...


6

Id say that it would be a flawed pattern that can't withhold consistency. Sure, it would work for instances where there is only one action available ("OK" or "Close" etc.), but when the popup is a dialog requesting a decisive action from the user this pattern can't be used, since tapping outside the popup won't provide enough feedback of which option the ...


6

Besides the scenarios of an application spawning lots of dialogs and the user trying to deal with them in a hurry, there is another perfectly legit situation: What if the user doesn't understad your question? Where should they click? Imagine your app happens to ask a musician wheteher it should rebase samples repository. Or your app gets translated to ...


5

That would depend on whether you are using Windows or OSX and perhaps whether you are left or right handed and whether you are using a mouse or a touch screen. Nevertheless - a left handed touch screen user on windows will probably out of familiarity with a majority of software expect to find the button on the right. Generally - don't depart from the ...


5

Closing iPhone applications from within the app itself goes against Apple guidelines, so most developers would not take this route for fear of the app being rejected from the App store. Quitting from within the app "looks like a crash to the user." (Apple's words, not mine). There's a question on StackOverflow about this issue.


5

Yes, please include a close button. L.Moller is correct: you need to consider inexperienced users. Also, if the image happens to be too large compared to the window and there is no empty space, then the user cannot click to close the image.


5

Training users to do something different than in the usual way is extremely hard to do. This might be especially true in a computer game where the actions are less thought-through and often reflex-like. So you'd run into problems even if you laid the Esc functions on a different key. Users still would expect the confirm popup to close and might get ...


5

It's definitely not bold/radical since this has been done before. Anyway, I'd argue that it's not really user friendly. You're asking the user to take a leap of faith (ok, just once but that's one too many). Why not opt for this variation of your idea. For a non-action dialog, place an x-mark in the upper right corner but actually make the entire lightbox ...



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