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21

The major mobile touch screen operating systems (iOS, Windows Phone 7, Android) don't trouble the user with "closing" applications in the way that desktop applications do. This simplifies the experience, making applications appear seamlessly built into the operating system. Typically, applications on these operating systems will "pause" when the user ...


12

The [x] buttons on windows is meant to close the window. A [Close] button is meant to close the window. So, yes, they are meant to do the same thing. The operation of closing a window in some cases (a) closes the app, (b) in some cases minimizes the app (or hides it altogether) and (c) in some cases closes only that window. Examples: (a) A single ...


11

I believe this application (Skype) and many other communication type applications including instant-messengers, email clients and other VOIP apps, hi-jack the "X" button to minimize the more user-frustrating event of accidentally ending a users communication session. In many cases, users might simply want to get the application of the screen, the fastest and ...


11

Although it has become quite common that overlays close on an outside click, it brings some usability flaws if you don't offer the close button: Users that are new to the internet might be confused or feel lost when they can't find the close button (my mother, for example) On (some android (?)) tablets, these overlays still don‘t seem to work really well, ...


6

Closing iPhone applications from within the app itself goes against Apple guidelines, so most developers would not take this route for fear of the app being rejected from the App store. Quitting from within the app "looks like a crash to the user." (Apple's words, not mine). There's a question on StackOverflow about this issue.


5

They requested I add a "Exit with Saving" and "Exit without Saving" button to our existing toolbar which would bypass the prompt. (get rid of the "extra click") The entire purpose of that dialog is to create an extra click! In situations where the user could lose work, you have to protect against an accidental click. This is where the Save/Don't ...


5

Skype, being a peer-to-peer telecoms application, works much like BitTorrent and other P2P distribution methods by relying on users' own machines and internet connections to route the traffic of other people's calls. This means that, as a Skype user, your machine is being used to facilitate other people's connections even when you aren't making a call ...


5

Personally, if I were to develop an Android app I wouldn't include a close button either. As others previously mentioned, it's too easy to accidentally hit the close button inadvertently. What I would do, is include a close/quit command as an option that comes up when the user hits the Menu button. It just feels like it should be a menu option instead of a ...


5

That would depend on whether you are using Windows or OSX and perhaps whether you are left or right handed and whether you are using a mouse or a touch screen. Nevertheless - a left handed touch screen user on windows will probably out of familiarity with a majority of software expect to find the button on the right. Generally - don't depart from the ...


5

This is an old element inherited since Windows 3.1 where the interface of the applications didn't have the, now common, "X" to close them. Before, on the top right there was a menu that you could access with the combination Alt+space and one of the options, the main one, was close. The double click basically activates the main option of that menu. At some ...


4

The great Aptana Studio has this kind of multiple choice prompt when closing several unsaved files. Love the way how you can Select All and Deselect All to swiftly select only a selection. Also the default of having all unsaved files checked by default is reasonable - most likely users will in fact want to save before exiting. (I am not affiliated with ...


4

I would recommend going with the cancel option since most users might not be used to the concept of using the close icon (the X) to close a dialog in a mobile app (you have them in websites) but then with a mobile app the common affordance to what I have found is to to have a distinct cancel option as shown below:


4

The ideal solution for this, given the long standing traditions of the X and close buttons as mentioned by Danny Varod, is to have the X close just the window, leaving the file selector window open still, and a 'Cancel Transfer' button (or something similar) that cancels the entire process, closing both windows. This would be most consistent with the ...


3

For the most part I would go with a dedicated 'Cancel' labelled button rather than an 'x' on mobile. The target area is generally to small for the user to have a fluid interaction. If you make the 'x' a bigger target area it can be used. A good size might be the one used for delete options(red -). It seems to work quite well for apple so far. Not exactly ...


3

Honestly, I don't think the answer to this is UX related. It certainly can't be related to the size of the 'close' button being too small-- tablets are plenty big and don't have close buttons either. I think the answer is just system resources. Mobile devices are slow, and it's a lot easier to switch between apps if they stay open in memory. If you're a ...


3

If you can provide an exit or close action in drop-down menus or the menubar (with a keyboard shortcut) you should go for it. I would suggest you analyse your application, application's audience / end users and proceed from there. You may even pimp your exit command(s) with "Save and Exit" or "Disconnect and Exit" etc. here's an example From a ...


2

From my childhood age onwards I worked in Windows only. In windows usually I use to close the window by double clicking the left windows title bar and more of friends use that technique only. Because we always use to read the text from left to right so it is easy for us to close the window quickly if it is in left side. For the Past 5 months only I working ...


2

At least with Facbok app there is no HOME button. The only way to get to HOME is go to main screen, open another app, double click the iPad home button, hold the icon until it wiggles, click the minus sign. Now when you open the Facebook app it puts you on your HOME page, and that is different than your wall.


2

It's because of the way Android is designed. The operating system manages the memory in a very different way to the way it's done on a desktop computer. The same goes for CPU. When you don't have an application on the screen (in the foreground) it no longer takes up any CPU. That is because unlike with desktop applications the OS knows that you can't be ...


2

With tiny little touchscreens and fingers typically bigger than the touch points and touch points normally too close together for said fingers, it would probably be far too easy to accidentally tap the close button when you intended to do something else. The only way that would work would be to have enough space around the close button where there isn't ...


2

You could easely visualize the toggle functionality with a + and - button. This type of expand/collapse buttons are common and easy to grasp. Another alternativ could be to implement Twitters' approach - just using words:


2

I think the general idea is that unless you absolutely have to or are going to get some great benefit out of it, do not hook into the on close event and slow down your user's intended action. It's a delicate balancing act for the reason you pointed out, that the appearance is then that your site is slow and bloated as the user starts to lose their feeling of ...


2

Those are not running apps they are recent run apps. Apple refers to them as "recently used apps" here. Further expressed in this article. So removing things from this list is hardly ever necessary. Nevertheless, should you want to remove them it should be doable without frustration. All in all wouldn't call it bad design. Maybe mediocre design.


2

I recommend not doing away with the typical exiting behavior without a good amount of user testing the new proposed behavior. For many editor type applications the typical one-dialog-per-open-file on exit is hard to improve on. The exiting behavior of Photoshop (which I happened to be using at the moment) brings to the top each unsaved image with the ...


2

Probably not. Inconsistency generally leads to confusion and frustration and little else. UX Movement has a couple of articles that provide more details (albeit lacking in research) and offer a good alternative approach: Always put the confirmation button in the bottom right corner Switch the emphasis of the buttons if you want to attract users' attention ...


1

I don't think it's a good idea. Users never read click on quit and see nothing happening click again without reading the cancel label and they are back to first step. This approach will give user frustration not understanding why his action do nothing. He will have to do it again a couple of time before seeing the change. The more basic approach of a ...


1

I've seen [Save] and [Cancel] buttons with icons to make them more obvious... but usually even then there is usually a warning prompt on the cancel. The problem is, if you don't have that prompt somewhere, the user not only could loose work - but doesn't have feedback to which one they clicked. One option is to provide a user setting that gets rid of the ...


1

It is expected that Close button should always be present in the UI -- usually in the form of the little "x" button in the top right corner (or top left if you're on MacOS). There is generally no need to add extra "quit" button to the toolbar. Now as for other possible buttons, you must understand that there is always a possibility for someone to click that ...


1

A lot of application designers - and I am one - suffer from the delusion that their application is the most important application that a user has the privilege of running on their system. They simply cannot imagine that a user would not want keep their application running. Or auto starting for that matter. So, they come up with tricks like minimizing on ...


1

Skype (and other communication applications) need to keep running in the background in order to be able to receive messages and calls. For communication applications (and a few other application categories, antivirus for example), this is - as far as I know - pretty much standard behavior.



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