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29

The major mobile touch screen operating systems (iOS, Windows Phone 7, Android) don't trouble the user with "closing" applications in the way that desktop applications do. This simplifies the experience, making applications appear seamlessly built into the operating system. Typically, applications on these operating systems will "pause" when the user ...


18

X has never meant exit, but there's a reason for the confusion X has historically been overloaded to mean two different things: Delete an item. For example: Close or Dismiss a window. This is not the same as exiting an app but historically, hitting the X button almost always resulted in an application exiting, so that is why users sometime confuse ...


15

A cross should always be used to close something. The problem is the meaning of closing. One thing is for sure, closing is not the same as minimizing. Your example for Skype in Windows is not correct. Close button closes the window, while the minimize window button minimizes the window, but doesn't close it. Therefore they don't do the same. On Mac OS, ...


12

The [x] buttons on windows is meant to close the window. A [Close] button is meant to close the window. So, yes, they are meant to do the same thing. The operation of closing a window in some cases (a) closes the app, (b) in some cases minimizes the app (or hides it altogether) and (c) in some cases closes only that window. Examples: (a) A single ...


11

I believe this application (Skype) and many other communication type applications including instant-messengers, email clients and other VOIP apps, hi-jack the "X" button to minimize the more user-frustrating event of accidentally ending a users communication session. In many cases, users might simply want to get the application of the screen, the fastest and ...


11

Although it has become quite common that overlays close on an outside click, it brings some usability flaws if you don't offer the close button: Users that are new to the internet might be confused or feel lost when they can't find the close button (my mother, for example) On (some android (?)) tablets, these overlays still don‘t seem to work really well, ...


11

I would recommend going with the close button for the following reasons Your close button is a visual indicator to users that they can click here to close the popover. While some users might be accustomed to clicking outside or pressing esc to close a popover( and you should support those users too), the close button helps establish the escape route.To ...


9

It means Close. Skype’s is a poor design. Use the correct button for your use-case. If your program cannot be closed, or at least non-trivially, don’t display an X at all, or disable the button. Replace it with _, which is the icon used for minimizing. Hindering attempts to close your software makes you look awful This behavior is one strongly associated ...


8

It's probably not necessary, that is becoming more and more of a standard for overlays. But if it does become a problem with users, it won't hurt to put a little 'x' in the top right corner - it's out of the way and everyone understands that is close.


6

Skype, being a peer-to-peer telecoms application, works much like BitTorrent and other P2P distribution methods by relying on users' own machines and internet connections to route the traffic of other people's calls. This means that, as a Skype user, your machine is being used to facilitate other people's connections even when you aren't making a call ...


6

I would definitely go with top right, because more people use windows than mac, and those who use mac, just like you, know that generally close button is in the top right corner. Remember where are you looking for the close button when you get a layer pop-up in a browser window?


6

They requested I add a "Exit with Saving" and "Exit without Saving" button to our existing toolbar which would bypass the prompt. (get rid of the "extra click") The entire purpose of that dialog is to create an extra click! In situations where the user could lose work, you have to protect against an accidental click. This is where the Save/Don't ...


6

Id say that it would be a flawed pattern that can't withhold consistency. Sure, it would work for instances where there is only one action available ("OK" or "Close" etc.), but when the popup is a dialog requesting a decisive action from the user this pattern can't be used, since tapping outside the popup won't provide enough feedback of which option the ...


5

That would depend on whether you are using Windows or OSX and perhaps whether you are left or right handed and whether you are using a mouse or a touch screen. Nevertheless - a left handed touch screen user on windows will probably out of familiarity with a majority of software expect to find the button on the right. Generally - don't depart from the ...


5

Closing iPhone applications from within the app itself goes against Apple guidelines, so most developers would not take this route for fear of the app being rejected from the App store. Quitting from within the app "looks like a crash to the user." (Apple's words, not mine). There's a question on StackOverflow about this issue.


5

Yes, please include a close button. L.Moller is correct: you need to consider inexperienced users. Also, if the image happens to be too large compared to the window and there is no empty space, then the user cannot click to close the image.


5

This is an old element inherited since Windows 3.1 where the interface of the applications didn't have the, now common, "X" to close them. Before, on the top right there was a menu that you could access with the combination Alt+space and one of the options, the main one, was close. The double click basically activates the main option of that menu. At some ...


5

Training users to do something different than in the usual way is extremely hard to do. This might be especially true in a computer game where the actions are less thought-through and often reflex-like. So you'd run into problems even if you laid the Esc functions on a different key. Users still would expect the confirm popup to close and might get ...


5

It's definitely not bold/radical since this has been done before. Anyway, I'd argue that it's not really user friendly. You're asking the user to take a leap of faith (ok, just once but that's one too many). Why not opt for this variation of your idea. For a non-action dialog, place an x-mark in the upper right corner but actually make the entire lightbox ...


4

Personally, if I were to develop an Android app I wouldn't include a close button either. As others previously mentioned, it's too easy to accidentally hit the close button inadvertently. What I would do, is include a close/quit command as an option that comes up when the user hits the Menu button. It just feels like it should be a menu option instead of a ...


4

The great Aptana Studio has this kind of multiple choice prompt when closing several unsaved files. Love the way how you can Select All and Deselect All to swiftly select only a selection. Also the default of having all unsaved files checked by default is reasonable - most likely users will in fact want to save before exiting. (I am not affiliated with ...


4

I would recommend going with the cancel option since most users might not be used to the concept of using the close icon (the X) to close a dialog in a mobile app (you have them in websites) but then with a mobile app the common affordance to what I have found is to to have a distinct cancel option as shown below:


4

The ideal solution for this, given the long standing traditions of the X and close buttons as mentioned by Danny Varod, is to have the X close just the window, leaving the file selector window open still, and a 'Cancel Transfer' button (or something similar) that cancels the entire process, closing both windows. This would be most consistent with the ...


3

For the most part I would go with a dedicated 'Cancel' labelled button rather than an 'x' on mobile. The target area is generally to small for the user to have a fluid interaction. If you make the 'x' a bigger target area it can be used. A good size might be the one used for delete options(red -). It seems to work quite well for apple so far. Not exactly ...


3

Honestly, I don't think the answer to this is UX related. It certainly can't be related to the size of the 'close' button being too small-- tablets are plenty big and don't have close buttons either. I think the answer is just system resources. Mobile devices are slow, and it's a lot easier to switch between apps if they stay open in memory. If you're a ...


3

If you can provide an exit or close action in drop-down menus or the menubar (with a keyboard shortcut) you should go for it. I would suggest you analyse your application, application's audience / end users and proceed from there. You may even pimp your exit command(s) with "Save and Exit" or "Disconnect and Exit" etc. here's an example From a ...


3

The only time I can think of when no close button should be there is when "Cancel" action is not acceptable, e.g. the user must make a choice. This is often connected to popups that isn't caused by user action. For example, the system must be restarted and asks the user when the system should reboot. "Now", "In an hour" etc. Letting the user close that ...


3

Yes. You do need a matching Cancel button to go with Save. If you don't, it may not be obvious how to close the dialog except via Save: This is particularly the case where the other buttons such as the X are only coloured on hover — as appears to be the case here. It may be less important if the X is always red. However, you should also consider ...


3

Imagine you were shopping and whenever you tried to leave a store, one of the sales people blocked your way until you had told them that you weren't interested in what the store had to offer and were sure that you wanted to leave. That is the real world equivalent of popping anything up when a user tries to leave a site. The one exception is if the person ...


3

Open vs close questions Children Here an advice you'd find sometimes with child education: It is better to provide a child with a specific set of options, instead of leaving it to them to work out the options themselves. For example, instead of asking your child "What would you like to eat?" ask her "Would you like an omelette or rice?". The ...



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