Hot answers tagged

111

Don't be so arrogant as to call yourself "right" and your client "wrong." Concentrate on the problem the client has given you, not the solution. The problem is that everything seems static, boring, and typical. He wants more wow. Your job is to give him more wow. How you do that is up to you. Forget about convincing the client that he is wrong. He is not ...


82

Wow factor is not always helpful Without the specifics it's hard to tell whether animation is going to be suitable for your site, but here are some common arguments for not using animation: Animations can distract users from their core task. Human perception is highly sensitive to movement, so animations can instantly rivet a user's attention in an ...


50

The client wants to achieve business goals, and they hired you to help them do that. So frame your pitch in terms of their objectives. What business metrics will the decision at hand affect? Could an unnecessarily tedious sign-up form lose potential revenue? Could you perform a user test to prove it? Would a confusing experience generate avoidable work for ...


46

To me, the most crucial problem here is that your client wants to see the site as HE wants it, not as users want it. He finds his perspective more important than the users' perspective. It doesn't matter why he likes animated sites, it doesn't matter that you don't. What matters is that he doesn't see that it's users who decide. He doesn't make conversions, ...


36

While for the end-user, the "less-is-more" theory tends to be a huge win, you've got to get into the client's shoes to get where this opposition comes from. The short answer is: they want to 'get what they're paying for.' I usually find myself in the sometimes awkward space mediating between board members, designers and the rest of the development team (...


35

In my experience you'll find this sort of politics in nearly every project and some user research can help you a lot. Try to stress out that not you nor they understand user needs exactly and to really know something, it might be worthwhile to do a little research. This way, you're not blaming them for doing your job in a bad manner. Instead you're stressing ...


18

What are you trying to solve? From a UX point of view, your heart is in the right place: any animation that solves a problem is welcome. For example, if you press one of the icons on iOS they will start shaking: that’s an animation that means something to the user. It delivers a message and solves a problem (how to show the user that he is about to delete ...


17

I would cite real research (don't actually ask them to read it, they probably won't) that proves your point, and show them some well-known sites as examples. Also take the information from those links you mentioned and apply it to their website. Be confident in your assessments and advice. Your clients aren't totally wrong about "the fold" though. Take a ...


17

Without knowing the specific contours of your situation, my general workflow would be: 1. A/B testing can be very effective in this sitatuion. If you have the means, user base, and budget to do this. The measurable results can be very helpful in making a case. If you don't have the time, budget, or user base to do A/B testing, then consider other ...


14

Probably, the main reason why clients are afraid of empty space is because they feel it exists because there was nothing to put in it! You can explain the following reasons why empty space is important: Allows easier readability of the content Prioritizes information and can bring actions into focus Conveys a sense of elegance and sophistication and ...


14

You're Wrong!!! (lol) There are a few key points. First and foremost you can not approach the problem as B is better then A. Better is an opinion. There is no way to say "better" that doesn't come off like opinion. Instead focus on the projects goals. If the goal is to make 500 sales, then prove, with real quantifiable numbers that B will have more ...


13

Always be polite. Do not say the client isn't the best judge, just say, we made some interviews and the result of them are, that the users want this function (or what ever the client think you're wrong). If the client, which say you're wrong, give you a reason why you should be wrong, and this reason isn't true, disprove his argument with your thought (but ...


13

A web site is not like a magazine cover or print ad which may be what your client is thinking. It doesn't need to draw the user's attention because if someone is at your website, they came there intentionally with some particular reason. If they can see the site, you've already sold them on visiting it. The goal then is to impart the best impression on ...


11

Everything does not need to be above the fold, however the important things do. In my field, eCommerce, the fold has been very real. Putting a call to action above the fold has increased our conversion rates on average. Same thing with e-mail campaigns. I have found this simple tool from google to be very helpful in determining the fold area. http://...


10

Assuming you're testing a change to an existing system, favor the control. It's what people are used to simply because it's already in place. If tests are inconclusive against users that aren't familiar with your site, at best the change won't help, at worst it briefly confuses current users. You failed to reject the null hypothesis, stick to what you have. ...


10

Build it. Take the time on your own, build it out and let them try it. But, they gave you the answer you need to overcome. Look at WHO you are dealing with. All the storyboards, mockups etc. won't matter as they can't see it. You shot yourself in the foot by doing all of that work first. UX 101: Did you ask the potential user first. "if I could take this ...


10

I'm sure you already know yourself why whitespace is good on the design side for making things feel uncluttered, but this information doesn't tend to help non-designer-folks want to get on-board with the lack of stuff. Talking in terms of priorities and KPIs. I've experienced much the same, and what I've found is that when I talked about things in terms of ...


9

First off, it's not wrong of the client to refer to the admin side as back-end. It's actually fairly common terminology to call any aspects of a content management system that aren't publicly available the "back end." This confusion between the front and back end of a CMS and the front and back end of code may be a large part of the problem you're ...


9

Normally, I prefer to start with a example which may not be the project core but explains the client the philosophy behind. And once the client understand the concept he starts believing in you and then you should bring in the core topic. Let me explain you with an example. First try to explain you Front-end and Back-end idea with reference to something he ...


8

Just to go against the grain here: Do not rely on A/B tests. Do not use strong head-on rational argumentation. These approaches are both saying "see, I'm right", when that's not how design works. For a good perspective on the limits of A/B testing, see this article. Yes, it's a useful tool, but it will not lead you blindly to a good design. Neither will ...


7

A personal bête noire is the near universal misinterpretations of Miller's "The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two" paper. People keep applying it in completely inappropriate ways - like the maximum number of items in a pull down menu. Grrrr! Another would be people who don't think accessible web design isn't important for them and then wonder why the ...


7

If possible, I would try to completely avoid showing the user the difference between server side and client side filtering. Will your users care where the filtering is done? Unlikely. So don't give them this unnecessary info. Better is to construct you UI in such a way that the first filter is always automaticaly server side then all subsequent filters ...


7

Don't underestimate the beast. It would be like taking Photoshop away from a designer. Excel is actually a phenomenally useable tool that people are familiar with. I've tried and failed to get analysts off Excel. Perhaps you could try watching some of your users to see what they do with Excel - show them that you really do want to help simplify their tasks....


7

It depends on what kind of animation you mean by "Flash-like" animations. If you mean "a lot of spinning doodads and scrolling marquees that do nothing," then your client is almost objectively wrong (insofar as any answer in a creative field can be "wrong"), for the reasons mentioned in the answer contrasting the images of a gaudy bus and a Porsche. ...


6

I usually ask them if they use Facebook. Or Amazon. Or Google. Or Netflix. And then I ask them if they scroll.


6

Quick anecdote: I was working at Intuit and redid the Quicken.com homepage. I added some icons and moved some stuff around. The marketers also changes of their own on their own version. Nothing goes live without extensive testing, so we all put our A/B tests into the hopper and waited. My design won by alot, and made Quicken over $20,000 per month ...


6

I think you got start explaining the macro picture of what UX does in day-to-day life, and then zero it to the particular area, it goes like this - "An UX specialist actually deals to understand products and interfaces from user perspective. Users are the predominant drivers for a product - and as an example (provide metaphors/example always) - imagine you ...


6

I think the problem is you speak with your client in different languages. You are speaking as designer and your clients are speaking as businessmen. Hence the common points in your dialog shift to rather subjective topics. You try to give them authoritative (for you) sources, while they are non-technical people and hence do not comprehend them, I think they ...



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