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28

drag'n'drop nearly always has bad affordance. The current model in gmail is the following: Albeit I'm not sure if they're really serious about it, esp. as it only appears to the hovered element. The previous one was this: More dragg-ish, but still bad. I think in order to reach good affordance with a drag-n-drop control, it either has to be ...


14

Three bar icons are now being used widely to indicate a "show list/menu" function - it's not just Chrome. Below are screenshots from Day One and PlaceMe (I only had to open a couple of apps to find examples of this usage). I believe the icon was a poor choice by Apple (in hindsight) - it does not give a clear interaction cue, it's more of a reorderable ...


10

Jennifer Morrow (part of the Firefox user experience design team) wrote a pretty detailed blog post about removing the Firefox status bar in 2010. As already mentioned, the aim was to remove the unnecessary "chrome" from the Firefox UI. I'd recommend you read the whole post. A short extract: The goal is to find places where chrome can be minimized, both ...


6

I could think of two reasons a link to Mozilla, which wouldn't make much sense, if you ask me you're offline, you dinosaur!


5

Don't inform them. Provided it works fine on all browers and doesn't look a huge mess in IE8 (see 'Graceful Degradation') then why bother telling users to update their browser? The chances are if they're using an old browser it's because they don't have a choice - it could be a corporate network where they don't have permission / ability to update, for ...


5

As you mentioned its about the subconscious level, if the system or application can provide a perception that a system has changed state in a high speed that it almost seems instantaneous, it enhances the user experience since it gives a sense of continuity and also informs the user about the change. To quote this article from smashing magazine A good ...


4

I don't see this as a dark pattern at all. I haven't done any testing on this, but I've never been the slightest confused about that. The opt in is directly related to the TOS, and this seems to be a good place to put it.


3

I'm taking a wild guess, since it's very hard to find out "why" on anything Google does. However, I think the choice is more useful since it supports how we use the web today. Back in the days (early 1990s) when the web was static, it was simple and easy to look at the history to find out where you were last. Today that's a different story. We use rich web ...


3

Chrome was a major change in browsers. The major change it brought was screen space. Where IE and FF came from desktop apps and windows Chrome removed a significant amount of the 'Chrome' surrounding the window. The only thing it cared about was getting as much of the Web page displayed as possible. Chrome was backed by Google and achieving massive growth ...


2

If its faster than the eye can see then I doubt we will be able to appreciate on an unconscious level. I think that transition is there as a backup for when systems are performing slower than normal and the user needs to be informed that a process/action is taking place.


2

Chrome's notification system works best when combined with extensions and Web Store installable or hosted web apps. When a user installs an extension or web app, they are asked once whether they want to give the app certain permissions, such as local storage, location, or desktop notifications. Once they give that permission, it's permanent until the app is ...


2

If it's not a dark pattern, it's pretty close. I call shenanigans on it. Obviously they are attempting to increase enrollment by leveraging the rote pattern of clicking the checkbox and submitting the ToS form. They are relying on the universal fact that no one reads any of this stuff. Sneaky. If they wanted to be on the level. They should put that statement ...


2

In my opinion, this is not a dark practice. It doesn't fall into the user experience category nearly as much as it lends itself to user rights (or something similar). This is standard practice by many software companies, Microsoft, Apple, Yahoo!, Blackberry, etc. The "dark"-ness depends on the purpose of the interaction. The user data and feedback that ...


2

I agree that the three-lines icon is being established as a place to pull something. (See in particular the lined tab that appears if you drag down from the top of an iOS screen to show notifications, or on the lock screen when multiple notifications are waiting, or on the camera icon on the lock screen.) Matching that icon to the real world examples of the ...


2

From a user perspective I think it would be better to default to off for this, the new tab on update could then ask if the user wanted to enable it, the tone of this question is very important: Hi my name is x and I developed this extension, enabling y setting would help support me to support/improve the extension as well as donate to charity. I am ...


1

For what I compile out of your post, some of your requirements... Some remarks: Think before you start working out the idea, what you want it to do; What are logical steps in the process to achieve the task? Make it fail proof... A few pointers what I think of: When using a notification, it's not going to stay for minutes I assume, merely a matter of ...


1

Notification seems like the most obvious solution. It's large, in your face, and will have minimal confusion. The others could be confused with the actions of other extensions, not the best UX.


1

Keyboard Shortcut navigation is not a new phenomena, but its efficiency is questionable. Because keyboard shortcuts have the same problem as command line tools; there are no visual clues of what you can do. You have to fill your mind with irrelevant information of keyboard shortcut navigation until the day when you have placed the patterns in your muscle ...


1

If your extension is solving a problem and has many users, you could consider integrating a Flattr button in your interface. It's growing more and more popular, and I think that by being a "recurring" donation system, you get more than from a normal Paypal donation. You could try it at least, no one will get upset that you have a button for donation in ...


1

While some changes (for example making the whole UI take up less vertical space) indeed look like they copy Chrome, it is a trend almost all browsers followed. However, it is in face changed user hardware, namely the growing predominance of widescreen displays and the consequent higher importance of vertical screen space, that induced this change - Chrome ...


1

A change in the UX is not necessarily bad; good designers think about not only their existing user base but also their business strategy and new users who they want to attract. Their decision process would probably have considered the possible inconvenience to their existing user base weighed against the increase in usability for new users. A number of the ...


1

No, it is not acceptable. The web server should only deliver what the user agent tells the server to deliver. This is what the user agent does, even though it has changed since the origin, it is still valid and a cornerstone of web technologies. "In HTTP, the User-Agent string is often used for content negotiation, where the origin server selects ...



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