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67

Etsy spent quite some time developing and testing infinite scroll in their search listings. They noticed fewer clicks on results and fewer items favourited from the infinite results page, and users stopped using the search interface to find products. They reverted back to traditional pagination. There's a good article about it here: ...


22

Booking.com experimented with it, conversion dropped immensely. Everything they do there is A/B-tested. I wish I could share statistics, but those are documented internally so you'll just have to take this anecdotal evidence for what it is: something a guy on the internet posted. That said, the reason no large e-commerce websites use it means that it ...


21

An example of this claim can be found in Smashing UX Design: Foundations for Designing Online User Experiences - page 300, point 2. It says that an odd number of products: can be easier to scan, makes the choice easier to make, keeps the eye moving across a row because the items cannot be grouped easily. It suggests that this might be backed up by the ...


15

In the original GUI guidelines from the Lisa/Macintosh, Xerox Star, and Microsoft Windows, check boxes are, as the name implies, something you can mark (with a check-mark) if you wish to select or mark it - or clear if you wish to deselect it. Each checkbox choice is independent of each other, in terms of their activation. Radio buttons, on the other hand, ...


14

Yes, there is a convention: checkboxes = option for multiple choices radio-buttons = only one single choice among the options


8

Looking at the convention you should have the most popular option on top. The user is used to scanning a list this way, from top to bottom, no matter how the list came to be. Taken from Google Chrome: Collapsed Expanded The upper alternative is Open, which would be the most utilized in this case.


4

In this situation, you're correct to reject the 7+/- approach. Really, the answer is that too much choice results in no decision being made. This is a variety on the Analysis Paralysis. Analysis Paralysis refers to over-analyzing (or over-thinking) a situation, or citing sources, so that a decision or action is never taken, in effect paralyzing the ...


4

As a user, I hate running into limits after I've invested time. For example, say I've uploaded 50 pictures thinking I can make a slide show with all 50 pictures. If there is a limit of 10 slides, and I don't discover this limit until I go to add the 10th or 11th slide, I'm gonna be unhappy. So, my first suggestion is to indicate from the beginning what the ...


3

Here's my take on your second question. Long story short, it is naturally simpler to "divide & conquer" an odd group: In an odd grouping, the center item likely becomes the natural focal point, and so you'll get a mental image of that item in your mind as you look at it. Next, your eye will likely gravitate to one of the side groups to compare your ...


3

Allow the user to set his own default snooze time and so that can be customized so that he can set when he wants to be reminded.What might seem like an optimal snooze time for you might not be for others. For example, I like to set my alarm snooze time as 10 minutes though for my reminder apps I set it as one hour as I know that if I cannot attend the ...


3

Infinite scrolling is generally bad for eCommerce sites because it doesn't allow users to bookmark pages or save where they left off if they leave and come back. Basically, if the user leaves the site, they lose their progress and it's hard for customers to know if they are getting the best product because they don't know for sure whether they've seen all ...


2

There can be only one gold, one silver, and one bronze user, and they obviously can't be the same person. Radio buttons, being the standard 'there can be only one' control is the obvious choice. First, you can't 'Turn off' a radio button. In the case of accidentally choose a 'Gold' winner, a set of radio buttons provides no clear way to give the input of ...


2

In Methods Engineering (I'm a Industrial Engineer) when you layout work stations or assembly lines, the chosen position for tools, materials, machines and people is influenced by the distance between consecutive actions, in order to gain efficiency by reducing the time you lost in transportation. So, as an Industrial Engineer, I would prefer your second ...


2

There are some good implementations of a select list being expressed as a drop-down menu with type-ahead filtering available now, which accomplishes the same thing without imposing a pop-up. The pop-up has the additional cognitive load of "how do I get rid of this?" (answered as "use the [select] or [cancel] buttons), as well as the additional effort load ...


2

Traditionally, checkboxes have been used to indicate simple on/off choices. Occasionally, they are used to indicate on/partially-on/off or on/off/indeterminate state (the technical term for that being tristate checkboxes), but that's unusual and I do believe a lot of users get tripped up by that. (For a specific example of the latter, try the folder ...


2

The behavior of checkboxes learned by users is to be able to choose multiple options. In your case, it may be a relic of some former functionality, e.g. a form with some strange dependencies.


2

Personally, I like the way then there is a default (most visited) version of the site is shown and there is an ability to switch to another (less visited) version if needed (with "save my choice for future visits" action). It could be done like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups It's better because most of the ...


2

I'd advise against using the current concept. It's clever, but it should be obvious. Additionally, if you're assuming that it'll be used on both desktop and mobile, the way that users interact with it will be inconsistent. Finally, redefining a very common pattern (pinch & spread) for something other than zooming in & out is going to necessitate a ...


2

As I see it there are two main flow strategies to choose from, and interestingly two of the large players have implemented one each: Facebook has one call to action from the news feed, namely "Photo". When a user goes into that flow they are initially presented with their album to make a selection. To capture a new photo there is a CTA to the camera at ...


2

Not only is this a convention, but the expected behavior is explicitly called out in the HTML 4.01 spec (and I wouldn't be surprised if it was in pretty much every other version, as well): Several checkboxes in a form may share the same control name. Thus, for example, checkboxes allow users to select several values for the same property. [...] ...


2

Basically the number of choices given to the users should not be too many. How much depends on what the product is and what are the suggested products. Since, here its food, the lesser number of choices the more likely that people would actually make a choice. Sheena Iyengars famous jam choice experiment talks about choice overload. " At a luxury food ...


1

People can remember on average between 6 and 9 things at a given time. I think this is one of the reasons why most website like Amazon and Ebay show a number of suggestions that is fairly close to this figure. You don't want to overload your user with suggestions.


1

The best way to go when offering small amounts of options is checkboxes or toggles. It's easy to use, you can find out what are the options at a glance, and you know what to do. Your goal should be to make it feel intuitive and natural, minimizing interactions (number of clicks/taps). Classic checkboxes The facebook mobile website uses the classic ...


1

"How likely are you to recommend Product X?" where 5 = Extremely Likely and 1 = Not At All Likely. From these responses, you can build your product or service's Net Promoter Score. Probably the reason the Net Promoter Score has become so popular with the C-Suite is because it's one simple question that does not require much from the customer, and identifies ...


1

The yes/no question is leading (of sort). You are directly asking for the user if he liked your product or not. If you want honest feedback, I would avoid such questions since experiments have proven that people tend to be polite when reviewing/giving feedback, especially if they are doing so in person. If you want good feedback, keep the questions ...


1

The colors are a bit bland, and the interface looks like it leaves room for fat-finger errors. I think something like this: http://puu.sh/1TmRA would relieve that pain significantly, especially if the selected answer were highlighted in grey on the first tap and had to be tapped again to be submitted.


1

I think it is OK, even for short lists: It promotes consistency: no surprise when you click on the button, you will always get the same. It develops automatisms of usage, without having to aim for a component that can vary depending on the content of the list. Short lists are OK, and even better: you can see at a glance all elements. The search field is ...


1

Let them choose the background easily with a limited initial set of colors, expanding to unlimited - and auto-toggle (based on color math) the foreground color between a light and dark to give good contrast. Balsamiq does this automatically. Below I created two buttons - when I changed the right button background to red, it automatically toggled the ...


1

It depends what's the point of different colors: is it only for personalization, eg. the dashboard colors are not designed for a public audience, but rather for yourself? In case it's a personalization, the next question is about amount of dashboard boxes: what's the likely amount you'll have? It can be that if you have a hundred boxes, you want to have ...


1

When you select one and only on out of three options you should use radio buttons. You see all the options at once (apart from a dropdown) and you can select only one item (apart from a checkbox). download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups



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