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82

What you have described here is not 'childishly' colourful - The colours represent different information: the colour has meaning beyond decoration. Scratch colour codes its code blocks according to what type of element they are (variable, logic operations, flow operations, etc) in a similar way that Sublime Text (and many other code editors) does: This ...


24

Because kids still have a sense of exploring their world and will try things because they aren't sure how things work. So when something doesn't work, they will try a different way. Children tend to be more creative than adults as they are less constrained my experience. Older adults have years of life confirming that things should be done in a particular ...


19

(Fill in the curly braces { } below with whatever fits.) Hiya kids! My job's making websites fun. Who can name a website? [Open the website if there's a computer available. Have a local kids' site ready if none of the kids respond. If no computer is available, make a large paper prototype ahead of time.] [The following should explain information ...


12

For starters, the definition of child resistant packaging states: To be child-resistant, 85% of tested children less than 5 years old must not be able to open the package within 5 minutes (this means 15% of children can open the package quickly), and 90% of tested adults must be able to open and properly close the package within 5 minutes. I ...


10

I dont think you will get a definite answer to this since the colors you choose will have to mesh well with your game design and background. However I would recommend making the choices prominent and if possible use pictorial representations to show what each level might be. here is a good example : Alternatively you could go with a color scheme which ...


10

I found this link which might help you to answer why kids perform better than adults sometimes. Hope the big article helps to some extent :) This is a part of discussion between two experts and the interviewer. Just an excerpt from the same page: TKF: My daughter and I are learning the pedal harp, and I find I progress much slower than she does. She ...


9

Instead of a password, how about a passphrase? Kind of like needing to know the secret phrase to enter the club house. Passphrases tend to be less hackable by the nature of its length. http://xkcd.com/936/


9

This comes down to it being an Access v. Security issue. Are the children logging in to identify themselves within a system and get acquainted with the concept of "logging on"? Or are they legitimately securing their session and data from other kids? I'm presuming the former. I think it is important to avoid personal preferences, favorites, or names. Things ...


9

I would tone down those colours a little. Two of the effects of colour on a screen are physiological and have nothing at all to do with the age of a user, but everything to do with the physics of eyes. Firstly, all eyes suffer from chromatic aberration. You cannot bring red and blue into focus on your retina at the same time. (If you display a pure red ...


8

European ski slopes also have black. Mountain bike trails are also green, blue, red and black. Since this project is for younger ages, I'd skip the black. Such sporting activities as skiing, biking and others also make use of shapes to further differentiate, rather than using colours alone - thus appealing (or not) to the subconscious. So for example a ...


7

My son has used sites like this before (Dreambox and RazKids) but for 1st and 2nd Grade children (in the US) they were given a roster for their class with their names on it and clicked that item for their Username. Password was typically some combination of symbols that were selected, I think the site for the 1st grade was just one symbol so it was easy for ...


6

A lot of this depends on the framing: i.e. "What age are children supposed to be deterred most by the packaging?" I bet the cases mentioned of "parents letting their kids (supervised) open child resistant-packages" do not refer to 4-year olds, but more likely 8-year-old-plus kids. At the extreme if you use a quasi-legal definition of "children" as ...


5

Colorful? Yes, Childish? no. Color has a huge place in design, especially in any sort of coding IDE as pointed out by other answers, color helps indicate to the user what the function of each word is. Bright colors are probably fine to use too, but mute the colors down from the mock up you give. Neon colors on a white background are a little hard to look at ...


4

As you have stated, it is never the intention of these packaging requirements to make the packaging easier for children to open than adults. In fact any packaging that cannot be opened by 90% of seniors (aged 50–70) fail the packaging tests themselves (16 CFR § 1700.20). The test for seniors—16 CFR § 1700.20(a)(3)—requires the following: 100 senior ...


4

Your logo looks big enough that most users (kids or otherwise) ought to mouse over it if they're confused about how to get to the homepage. I would suggest a mouseover on the logo that displays a home icon or similar text to reinforce that concept. Kids are quite adept at picking up patterns though so it would be wise to spend an hour or two researching ...


3

It is. School is an auto gamification pointing system (no badges) so it will be stressful by adding rewards (or not giving to low scores -> double disappointment)


3

It is commonly known that children forgot their password, especially younger ones. Is there any evidence that children forget their password more often than adults? How often do children forget their password? Everyone forgets their passwords all the time. It's a terrible system for everyone. So, can't we do something without having to remember ...


3

The cursor should show the current active state of potential interaction. When over the Canvas, it should display the tool's cursor. When over the interface, it should show the typical selection cursor. The cursor is a hint for what happens when the user interacts (clicks) with the current item. You don't paint buttons; you click them, so the cursor should ...


3

In particular, avoid black on red (use white or yellow instead) or black text with any dark color. In other words, use text that contrasts well with the background. Andrew Martin made a great point in his answer: Children in this age range are starting to develop more sophisticated sensibilities. But at any age, a more subdued color palette with selective ...


2

The correct answer is "whatever works best for your target audience". You should perform some discovery testing using the varying approaches you're considering with representative users and a simple task of navigating back to the homepage from within the game. The answer may surprise you, but will be based on some real data versus conjecture as to the ...


2

That depends on the goal of the game. I assume it is educational in nature, so the question then is whether you are trying to test or encourage speed in answering or simply trying to get the kids to learn something. If the goal is linked to speed (like say the multiplication tables), then I would say that it is acceptable to include some sort of timer. I ...


2

It depends what you're trying to teach the kids 6-14 years of age. To be able to answer within a time limit for the benefit of...? To answer a question correct, without the timing aspect of the game. Both ways are "correct" in a sense, since kids usually have no problem understanding the timer issue in games. But I guess you have the answer in your game ...


2

I believe a counting timer puts a lot of stress, both kids and adults. It draws the attention, and emphasizes the time limit. In some situations it could help boost excitement, and feeling of competing against time, like you see sometimes in TV shows. This draw this conclusion after some experience in developing and conducting psychological experiments, ...


2

"Sometimes easier to open" may man one of these: there are some child-resistant packages that are easier to open by children there are some chilren that find opening child-resistant packages easier than adults there are some reports of children opening the child-resistant packages easier than adults This division is important, because each of the three ...


2

Children aren't the only ones that struggle with passwords I'm not familiar with the research, but we all know that people of all ages struggle with passwords. In this regard, children are no different than adults except that their still developing cognitive abilities will exacerbate the problem. Why use a traditional password at all? There are ...


2

I wouldn't add gamification to education. School is not just a place where you learn math and physics, it is a place where you get to learn how to function within a society. It prepares you for your professional future. No job offers gamification to its employees. And I doubt that senior management would embrace it even if somebody told them they should ...


2

I think you should show a usual password field at first. Those users that come up with a secure enough (according to your rules) password shouldn’t be bothered with additional reading or even a password choosing wizard. You could show a password strength checker. Users that initially decided to use a password that’s not secure enough might reconsider when ...


2

The clue is the word "children": Make it FUN. Make it a SECRET that the child and the computer share. Instead of "registering" (boring, adult), turn it into "inventing a secret!" (Fun, play) Have lots of praises for remembering the secret, and for re-entering it quickly & correctly, e.g, "Wow you logged in so fast, you are so clever!". . 1. FUN i. ...


2

Just thought I'd throw this out there. A significant % of people are colour blind. Colours can be useful, but also don't neglect size, outlines, etc. I really liked outlines as a kid and visually that is the thing that strikes me as the most useful; to me the colouring makes it too busy. I would try to at least add some meaning to the colouring.


1

I would lean to the xkcd.com "correct horse battery staple" example. You will bring in the concept of entropy; of calculation time and kids will have a fun time linking words together: "chocolate booger factory"; "mets rule yankees drool"; "teachers leave those kids alone"; and whatever else middle school kids can think of.



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