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In my opinion, if e-merchants place all the necessary information on only single page, that will be fine for the customers. I am of this opinion because I myself using one page checkout and given awesome results. Initially, I have to spend money on purchasing a one step checkout module from FME Modules, but the returning were more than the price.


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I think that your checkout process is clear enough without the order summary as an additional "check" for the customer. The most common process would be the following: Cart Summary Delivery Payment Confirmation/Thank you Lots of people use their online shopping cart as an informal shortlist. They are basically curating the contents of their order after ...


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NO need to show all details. Just Product thumbnail, name and quantity. Customer has already made up his mind to buy something and that is why he has put it in his cart. Also showing too much information may distract the customer. This is my opinion. You can consider A/B test. I was doing this study and research for more than 3 months for my company and ...


2

There are expectations at play — users have an idea of the form and would want to see button there, otherwise the whole component would seem incomplete/broken. Disabled button implies visually that user has to complete the form (correctly) before it can be submitted. By hiding the button, you are hinting that there is no such condition. As users know from ...


3

Hiding the submit button is not part of progressive disclosure. The only case where a submit button is not available upfront is probably within a Staged disclosure where there are a number of interdependent steps displayed in a wizard or similar pattern and submission taking place as part of the last task in the process: see below for distinction between ...


3

In most cases this is not a good idea. It comes down to UX goals: The main goal of a credit card form is usually to get the user to complete a purchase. Error correction and validation is only useful if it helps you accomplish that goal. The Buy it now, Purchase it, or Complete purchase buttons are usually excellent opportunities to display a clear ...


0

As was hinted here before, it really depends on what the users are used to. As a consumer in Israel, I'm used to seeing prices that include VAT (because that's the law in Israel). Recently I came to the US, and no one here shows you the VAT before the check-out. Even e-commerce sites in the US show the VAT only at the check-out. Though irritating, I soon ...


2

Yes, yes and yes! 37% of our customers would not proceed with the purchase once they would find out that VAT was added at the later stage. We (my company) used to sell cheap trips around Europe to students. At first we thought that excluding VAT is a good idea, but shortly realised that we are loosing a lot of customers. After surveying those who never ...


5

This depends entirely on your target audience. There are two trains of thoughts, but both have ultimately the same outcome: Tell them there and then on the product page. In detail: Audiences who pay VAT Most consumers will not want to be surprised by VAT at the checkout (it is a hidden cost) and yes this would definitely reduce the number of abandoned ...



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