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4

Best [for users] isn't always best [for business] Sometimes usability and profit don't line up. At least, not in the short term. And businesses are rather adverse to long term perspectives these days. Amazon ran a lot of tests on that checkout flow over time (I ran a similar test myself). The question was (is?), will more users make it through the checkout ...


0

The 2nd approach seems more reasonable to me. The 1st approach seems like "pay first and then see items in your basket." I think users need to get feedback that items that they are about to order have been downloaded successfully. One option to keep people from leaving is to allow upload without registering and allow check out as a guest. My guess is that ...


1

I would also suggest you make the box red rather than green. Green gives off the feeling it is completed successfully, IMO red would imply more action is required.


2

Not a full answer, but your approach #1 is wrong, as you likely guessed. Bank of America has a similar page when transferring money between accounts or to a friend's account. You pick the from account, the to account, the total amount, the date of the transfer, then hit next. Then you're on the "review everything" page. Once you click "complete transfer", ...


4

Add a 'confirmation' tab last, after 'submit' (and change 'submit' text to 'summary'), so the user knows there's another section to go before they're done. It's odd for user to be on the last step in tabbed checkouts, but not be done.


1

Is there a very good reason why you are putting the confirmation page after the payment details page? Normally, one confirms their email address and shipping details, followed by the payment details (card numbers have checksums to guard against typos, negating any need for additional validation). Furthermore, most banks require some form of 2-factor ...


19

I don't like the words Submit Request - as a designer that is what pressing the button does. For a user, it is more-or-less as meaningless as Press This Button. I don't think Send Request is much better, possibly worse (where is the request going to be sent to?). I suggest Place Booking if that is what your system is about: booking a course somewhere. ...


9

You should really change the wording on your primary action buttons to make it absolutely clear. "Submitting request" or "Send request" is what your browser does when the user clicks a link or button, but "Pay for session" is what the user wants or has to do in this context to continue. By using a modal dialog you show the user that he has to complete the ...


10

Change the behavior to fit the intuition You might want to change the behavior to fit the user intuition, instead of changing the design to "make the user understand" the behavior that you originally intended. If there are no major reasons for the details to be set in stone at that point (and they aren't, since apparently they can cancel it before the ...


3

Your page gives everything equal weighting, and this is why it looks like a summary page - your instincts are correct. Pick some stuff to highlight, such as what they have bought and how much. The summary information you have here is good. My previous user testing has shown that customers really do read it and use it for correction. For that reason I don't ...


3

You should consider that your checkout funnel is too long. ( so many steps in your progress bar. Think about combining or eliminating of some steps ) , this may scary users + too many opportunities for user to leave funnel w/o converting.


73

Render the confirmation in a modal: This will highlight explicitly to the user that one more action is needed.


3

This is a content strategy questions and the answer would depend on the tone of your overall site. Some sites have spent a lot of time developing a "personality". So within that concept, if your site overall is a straight transnational (in, out, done) site it would be good to end with a message that fits that content model. Such as your typical, "Your order ...


3

It really depends on your site, who your customers are, and what they expect. One can conceive of a website as a medium in which "You, the store owner" are talking to "Me, the buyer." In that scenario a more personal scenario may work very well. In other cases (say Amazon) in which one knows there isn't a "person" on the other end it may not work as well. ...


0

I agree with @JayFlow's answer and would also add that by removing the navigation you are actually protecting the customer. In a real world waiting room or queue you are likely to lose your place if you move somewhere else. That's pretty obvious if you're actually standing somewhere but isn't necessarily clear when you are online. You could (maybe should) ...


3

This practice is common in checkout processes, as it isolates the vital information at hand and encourages the user to focus on the action needed. It also helps keep the process linear and avoid confusion as to what action needs to be taken next. I believe in a waiting room metaphor, this makes just as much sense. some interesting reading: Smashing ...



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