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142

If you feel the 'Confirm Email Address' field is required, but want to prevent people copy-and-pasting it then why not take a different approach? When requesting the user details and email address just ask the questions once. Then, on the final sign-up / payment screen (depending on your application) add a field on this last page stating: "We will send ...


82

I would avoid this behaviour as it's breaking people's basic expectations of being able to copy/paste. October 2011 - an article by blogger, speaker and serial entrepreneur Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten on The Next Web (which he founded) - 10 ways to screw up a web form and piss me off Number 1 - that's number ONE: Don’t ask people to re-type email ...


67

I found an article that explains this. Apparently, in Argentina, ATMs give cash before the card, resulting in a large amount of people leaving their cards behind. See http://uxmovement.com/thinking/preventing-user-errors-in-automated-teller-machines/ - unfortunately there are no references cited so I'm unsure how true this is. To me, however, it would make ...


31

The question that was not asked directly: Should we hide the main navigation in the checkout process? Yes, we should hide it. A merchant wants to hide the main navigation mainly because of the conversion rate (ratio between people entering the checkout process and the ones actually finishing it). For average users the checkout process can still be ...


23

Since the email field is unmasked, the confirmation seems redundant to users. If the user is advanced enough to copy and paste instead of retyping, the user probably knows his/her address. Preventing copy and paste would just annoy users. When the user copies the email, the user has to look at what he wrote and thus would probably notice a mistake, ...


22

Unfortunately there aren't many real references to help answer this question. UXMovement has an article which Tass references in their answer, which makes some good points about the task flow of using ATMs. In summary: Users follow the tasks in sequence, but regard the task as completed once they have achieved their goal. Subsidiary steps are easy to ...


16

This exact questioned is actually answered! This questioned is an example of a Forcing Function described in the book Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman Forcing Function Defined Forcing functions are a form of physical constraint: situations in which the actions are constrained so that failure at one stage prevents the next step from ...


16

I can see no real functional reason to clear a basket automatically. Basket should have a function to clear old(er) items. A "select all" on the list of items in the basket and "remove from basket" action would suffice for that. Other than that there should be warnings on price changes as Amazon does. And of course there should be a warning when an item in ...


15

TL;DR: Use a single text field, store as a single string, show an address label preview. Separate fields have served limited purpose, such as safely identifying the country, town or zip code area someone lives in. They also allowed to enforce some constraints, such as providing a fixed list of countries. They also - in theory - allowed to "reduce the ...


14

This is tricky, because you have a variety of different scenarios for when automatically clearing items is a great idea and probably just as many for when it’s not. Personally I agree that it shouldn’t be cleared. I’ve been surprised when visiting the same site again to find items in my cart that I didn’t remove by myself. But that’s just me — and the ...


13

I would expect payment information to be demanded only once I've been presented with the absolute grand total, so that I know exactly how much I'm going to be charged. One of the common steps in a checkout process is choosing from delivery options, which often have different charges associated with them. Another example is gift wrapping, which usually ...


13

Your shipping and billing information is pretty crucial to the process of placing an order. If it's incorrect, your order will be misdelivered (not cool) or you won't be able to charge the customer correctly for the order. Like any input that has such huge consequences for a software process, it is good UX to allow the user to review this essential ...


12

Don't do this. Don't even do it for password fields. I use a password database (Password Safe) and I hate sites that won't let me paste a password after I've copied it to the clipboard. I'm trying to be a responsible netizen and not use the same password for multiple sites and not use short, easily cracked passwords either, so don't prevent me from doing so ...


11

Well its a human behavior that we never forget to take the money :). When we step into an ATM our primary task is to take the cash. So we are always in a mindset where we are trying to understand how much do I want to take out and what denomination will I get. In this phase we are all thinking about the CASH. The Card is just a medium to authenticate the ...


11

Though the number of steps you defined looks fine to me, This is going to be really hard question to answer unless you show screenshots of the pages in question since there are single page checkouts as well which handle the information density well and guide the user well. But to answer your question, there is no right or wrong number of checkout steps as ...


9

I am going to break this response into three parts: Is using the back button non intuitive to the user ? I would disagree with this. The back button is one of the most commonly used elements in the web browser and users know how to use it and finding that it doesnt work can actually be a really frustrating experience as they will have to initiate the ...


9

I would suggest hiding it if there are no valid coupons which can be applied to it. As per this article, 27 % of users abandoned carts to go search for a coupon codes and if there are no valid coupon codes available, there is a possibility you might lose your users as they might not return. That said, you can use that space to get people to sign up ...


8

I work at an eCommerce website and adding PayPal (though buggy) helped out conversion rates. However, adding a bunch did not. If you are building a CMS I believe it is best that you allow who ever is setting it up to choose which they want presented to users and to use. They might not want their money split up.


8

It's not even studies or evidence. It's one of the main principles of good UX: the fewer the screens a person needs to see to accomplish a task the better the experience is and the least frustration s/he feels. Fewer screens mean fewer steps, fewer opportunities to make a mistake, less time spent getting familiar with the content of the screen (even if it's ...


7

Simple answer : Yes When I am ordering something on the net, I like to be aware of the item I have order, what it has cost me, if I am paying for shipping (and if so, how much) and if the site offers free shipping for a specific amount, how much more do I have to buy to take advantage of the free or expedited shipping. Taking all this information away from ...


7

When selecting a testing method you should always first ask what the goal of the testing is, for no one method will suit all possible purposes. At the most basic level, different methods are good for discovery, while others are good for validation. Paper-prototyping is a testing method for discovery and understanding, and is ideally used early in the design ...


7

If you have a reasonably foolproof way to parse freeform addresses then I'd go for the single text box. I get annoyed on sites (particularly American ones it has to be said) that assume that your address conforms to a single standard and they force you to enter the data in their format when it doesn't. So if they say "City" and "County"/"State" and both are ...


7

The problem with this is that when a customer runs into the address field it will look like a mistake to them (textarea box). People get used to what a "standard" billing form looks like. They may become confused on what this field is asking for and might end up giving you some irrelevant information that you just dont want. If you do intend to go this way, ...


7

For starters, I strongly recommend not requiring users to not create an account before completing an eCommerce purchase as that just puts another step in their way to doing the cart checkout and can lead to cart abandonment. To quote this article Customers dislike having to register for yet another account. This quickly became evident during our ...


7

This is an interesting question. Thanks for asking. I had the exact same idea last year, and after some research and even an A/B test, I chose to stick with the field-set approach. This is based on my own experience with an online shop that actually ships fashion items. So this is about shipping address; not the billing address. Users who place online ...


6

There has been some great research into this realm done by the Baymard Institute. Here's their summary of their recommendations (though you should probably read the full article): Bad. How not to format the card expiration fields (yet what 40% of top retailers do): March / 2012 · Completely off. Month names are difficult to decipher and year ...


6

Removing items is not a "bulk operation" per se: At first look, "delete multiple items" would be a bulk operation where the checkbox pattern you chose is widespread and (probably) well accepted by users. Your case is quite different, though, since there is no other option aside from "delete/remove". Therefore, you're not dealing with a textbook "select ...


6

As Luke Wroblewski points out in "Web Form Design", the size of of an input field can help provide your form fields with affordance. The way you've adjusted the field lengths in the billing and shipping sections are good because they provide the user with an idea of what they're expected to enter. It would be a good idea to be consistent and have the input ...


6

I think you're taking the right steps, but with the wrong premise. I believe (with no evidence other than having discussed with friends and from personal beliefs) that shopping cart abandonment comes to two factors: 1) Being curious about how much the final cost of an order will be (after shipping and taxes), but realizing there's "too much work involved ...


5

Without knowing the site, and audience it's hard to say: If you already know that for your audience multiple purchases of the same item are a rarity, and you also know this is a hard-to-break behaviour (i.e. people just don't buy 2 pairs of the same $120 jeans at a time), then I'd say go for it. Also I'd say it depends on the number of replenishment items ...



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