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From UX perspective, a checkbox list will work better for all types of users. Because a user will be able to see some of the items immediately. It will force him to interact. The best practices are not to hide content under expanded controls.


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If the user selects a choice then make the selected button with a selectable style but also change the style of the other button to indicate that it is not selected. The target is to make the user select one or the other. Look at the design below: Yes No If you want to emphasize that this is an important choice allow the user to deselect the selected ...


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The most straightforward approach for the user is to keep the behavior when clicking a checkbox and clicking a row independent and internally consistent. In other words, clicking the checkbox should always select/deselect the row and clicking the row should always expand/collapse the "important info" content. Therefore, if the user has checked a row via the ...


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The answer is yes. Because of that pagination, when you start clicking the checkboxes you should be able navigate through pages and select other items. Otherwise bulk action will be impossible across different pages. Gmail has a similar behaviour when you select emails across several pages. Check that out.


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Taking bits and pieces from other's answers, as well as getting some additional feedback from the users (who said they would be okay with a single textbox at the end of each section), here are two more mockups: Using button groups Using a radio table (view in Codepen)


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I have an alternative suggestion. The suitability of this, however, will depend on the info typically entered into the optional 'comments' fields. If these fields typically contain a lot of data when completed, then this design may not be suitable. I suggest breaking the sixty fields into categories and using columns and rows to break up the fields into ...


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In this use case it appears to be the users job to consider every case. Then visibility is a reminder and a positive. Accordions / tab panels would mean extra clicks and potentially hide reminders I'm going to assume that that UI is well presented visually. Font size, spacing, etc. Also assume that keyboard control is optimal. Then few things can do A ...


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You may try a multi-record grid that each record has a list box with 60 options and a text box. You should make sure that the same option is not entered twice. When an option is selected, the next record will not display that option in the list box. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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Here is my suggestion. I hope you would like it. And here I gave 2 option i.e. 'paging' to show fix number of comments or 'load more' button to show all the comment at a time.


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A simple form like you might see at certain kiosks have the choices embedded in the action: This would inherently force a response while also removing the clutter of any "Next" or "Continue" buttons. A button is a one-click response. Why not a radio button or drop-down? It's far easier to push a button on a mobile device than it is to fool around with ...


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I would not esitate to use a set the interested checkbox as mandatory. In my opinion UX should take into account the marketing requests too. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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I think the both options which you mention can be use with minor changes. you can give validation/constrain i.e. An error message "Please select your citizenship" when user press the submit button without selecting yes/no. Short and sweet ! No need to think another solution and waste the time in such a small matter.


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One potential solution is to use a call-to-action type of interaction, so that at the beginning of the form you can have a button that says something like "US citizens click here" and "non-US citizens click here" that then helps to 'force' people into making a selection before proceeding further. However, I would only use this if none of the other options ...


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There're three cases that you have to be able to identify: yes / no / not-specified (i.e., user did not interact with this element). But if you pre-select yes or no then you won't be able to distinguish it from the not-specified case as you pointed. I'd suggest to use radio buttons or a drop-down (as both options are mutually exclusive) without ...



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