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From what I've seen, switches are used more for persistent system settings, whereas toggles are more contextual. So a switch might turn a service on or off, accessed from a settings panel but taking effect everywhere, while a toggle will act on the content that is currently in focus. Toggles do not need to be offered in groups. There are several valid ...


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Material design doesn't discourage the use of checkboxes for mobile. The link posted in the question refers to a specific use of checkboxes as a way of selecting items (eg an entire row, or a group of controls, or some text). Checkboxes are not good for that kind of interaction because it confuses the function of the checkbox. There are several reasons ...


1

I can only guess, but I think the intention behind this guidance is that Google wants to eliminate the ubiqitious appearance of checkboxes as first column in every table, for (single or multiple) selection. I would agree with the statement that this is an explicit anti-pattern for mobile (while it appears often on desktop designs). As stated, first think ...


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You are calling it a checkbox, but checkboxes come with labels. Why do you consider clicking as the correct usage for this? To me it seems like the developers haven't yet added the ability to drag the control, which usually happens as you move an application from a web to a mobile interface.


3

This is just plainly bad design. There is no tricky explanation as to why some of your users fail at performing the task. This is a fantastic example of how skeuomorphism doesn't work everywhere. The core purpose of skeuomorphic design is to present users with controls that they can recognize from the physical world and can interact using similar gestures ...


3

The visual metaphor here is an ON/OFF toggle switch It starts out in the OFF position to the left and can be turned ON (illuminated) by moving the lever over to the right. (the fact that this can only be done with a click is simply poor implementation) Read more about this pattern and how to improve upon it in this thread... Should a toggle button show ...


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Edit: To answer your question in the body: "Are the designers mistaken by making it clickable, or is there another explanation I'm missing?" It is a usability problem if users cannot easily figure out how to operate the UI element. If the design is not being used as intended (by the designer), then there is a flaw in the design. If the majority of people ...


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I would go with the UX solution, and this is why: The two options you considered differ on the response to clicking on the label of the item. This controversy was raised because clicking on the label does not have a clear affordance as to what it does. A user will not know what this click does until he actually clicks. Hence, I support the less ...


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I would go with the UX recommendation described above. You could do a couple quick user tests and see how people expect it to behave to support your hypothesis.


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Prevent the error first Your error message is good and will clearly inform the user. But if you can provide a clue about this error at the outset, you'll avoid some user frustration. If this happens more than once in your app, that tiny frustration becomes cumulative. Start with a notes under the control heading. Something alone the lines of Section ...


0

You are between a radio button and a check box. A radio button is exactly one. And with a radio button if you select B then A is un-selected. A check box is zero or more. You want one or more. I think a checkbox is a better as you don't automatically un-select. Since there is no a standard for 1 or more then I agree with a message. But I would ...


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Making the user unable to uncheck that last check box might be unnecessary since the last box that's checked might be the one the user don't want to be checked. This might be a better solution:


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Can you allow the user to temporarily deselect all 3 checkboxes without breaking your app? If so I would allow them to do this and then provide the validation message when the last checkbox is deselected. I would rather be allowed to deselect the option I don't want and then select the one I do than the other way round. If it is some kind of live filter ...


2

Often, such lists are part of a dialog that has an OK or Next> button. This is necessary to indicate that the user has finished making choices. This button can simply be disabled when no choice is made. This is intuitive enough, even if there is no direct instruction to pick one or more options. Note that this option fails if you make your dialog more ...


0

You should give users the freedom to select but never pre-select the options for the user. You should give full control to the user for all the decisions that he/she wants to make. When you start pre-selecting options for him/her, user feels "not in control" and kind of "being pushed/forced" (even though that's not your intention). I would go with, 3 ...


1

Even I encountered this problem in the app I'm working now. I don't show any message, if a user tries and fails to un-select the last item. But better option would be to disable the last remaining option which is selected. This visually indicates that at least one item is needed.


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Yep, I agree that one should be selected by default. ----- Additional comment below ----- This really depends on the context and what kind of application it is: what the label is and the options provided. That being said, it is a positive experience to add what matters to the user by allowing her to select her desired option(s), rather than requiring her ...


2

What you have checked by default should be based off of the user's most common response. If it is most common for the user to select all 3, then default to all three checked and handle it the way you described above (I think that seems nice). If you aren't sure what the most common response will be, you might want to default to having none of them ...



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