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I would consider a long label a problem: people don't usually read long text, especially if it is some legalese. But not for the reason you specify in the OP: accidental clicking is not an issue, especially when all checks are required. I have seen on multiple occasions companies giving me the one single check box, saying "I agree to (this site) (link: ...


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I don't believe it's an issue, however, if you're worried about it, you could rephrase each statement to have the assertions ("The above is correct and yada yada...") followed by the checkbox with "I agree" as the label. I'd watch how people use your page and see if any of them have this problem before trying to fix a problem that may or may not exist "in ...


0

A checkbox label should be max. 100 chars long. If you need more, you could add a "Read more..." button. It think this is a better method then throwing 5 copies of Lorem Ipsum to the user every time they need to use a checkbox.


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If you could add a line break, you can limit the <label> to only 1 line. Or if you don't use the label at all, the user would have to click on the check box itself and that would be solve the problem in a consistent way. However, splitting the label in the middle of a sentence is a bit strange - still possible to click on it by accident, while ...


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The radio buttons add cognitive load to the user and clutter the interface without providing any additional clarity. You can increase clarity and reduce clutter further with this approach: Enable: [] Administrative state [] Graceful restart [] Default route [] Multiple paths


1

To simplify and rephrase Samuel's answer: Use 1 checkbox if the choice is one out of two options. Or rather, a binary choice. Use radio buttons if the choice is one out of X options. Use X checkboxes if the choice is Y out of X options. This is actually not a single option with multiple selection options, but a series of options that you can select ...


1

The checkbox group implies optionality rather than default states. That would not be the right method to use if you want to show the user what the default states are. The first group using radio buttons is a better use. In iOS settings pages, they use toggle switches to indicate if something is enabled or disabled. That seems like the best way show this use ...


7

I would go with the rules of GUI standards and official W3C Web standards: Radio buttons are used when there is a list of two or more options that are mutually exclusive and the user must select exactly one choice. In other words, clicking a non-selected radio button will deselect whatever other button was previously selected in the list. Checkboxes ...


4

Checkbox Grid/Matrix I believe you were on the right track by using a checkbox grid. It's just your design of it that needs improving. I would go with the objects as headers for a table and the attributes as the rows. Benefits The objects and corresponding available attributes are clearly visible The selected attributes are obvious - emphasised by ...


3

You're correct about the matrix of checkboxes becoming ugly :) It's also not scalable to smaller screens (if that's a concern). Several solutions come to mind: MultiSelect This seems like a great use case for a multiselect. The advantage being its scalable to nearly any number of potential options, only selected options are shown, and its searchable so ...


0

The 2nd paragraph ["I want to be able to select only the parent (without the children) as well as have the children be selectable on their own or all together when clicking the parent"] makes it sound like you want to enable selection of the children checkboxes when the parent is checked, and disable selection of the children checkboxes when the parent is un-...


0

Your answer is two ( or three ) radio buttons. In your example, I would leave them unselected. I assume you are requiring them to choose one, so in this case, it's PERFECTLY acceptable to leave it unselected. ( ) Bill on the last day of the previous month ( ) Bill on the last day of the next month If you want them to be able to deselect it simply add ...


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About the default non-selected radio button - whether it is a good or bad idea - I think it depends on whether you want to give the user the option (or not) to go back to the original state. If you want the user to be able to undo his/her action, then the radio button is a bad idea because there is no way to uncheck, otherwise it is a perfect way to control ...


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Typically with a hierarchy tree (even just one level deep) there are two scenarios you can model. Either the top level is a "parent" to the "children" or the top level is just a convenience "grouper" for the items under it. In either scenario there is an inherent expectation if you provide a top level checkbox that it will select all children underneath it....


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Three-way checkbox might be what you're looking for. Multiple installation programs work this way, when you are selecting custom software components that you need. Node checkbox checked means - whole subtree is checked. On the other hand, checkbox unchecked = whole subtree unchecked. If only a part of subtree is checked, then the check box is in some third ...


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Without some more information on the design around the select button, it's hard to say. I assume you have a set of items from which your users can select a few. But is it in list form (i.e., rows of items) or in a grid (with cards for items)? I think in general one has to separate the two functions you mention: Some design aspect indicates the selection ...



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