Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

You could implement it the way typeform does it: Scroll and skip the questions you don't want to answer, and let radio buttons and checkboxes retain their default behaviour.


0

I would most definitely use check boxes (as radio buttons would be unhandy for mobile devices) with option to leave question unanswered. If skipping is not an option, then I'd suggest you allow users to 'remove question'. This would clarify to users that they don't need to answer irrelevant questions and they can be skipped.


4

Neither, sort of. Classic radio buttons are intended for mandatory, single selections. I don't really like radio buttons because they are hard to click and it's not obvious (or consistent) that the labels can be clicked. Classic checkboxes are intended for single on/off selections. Button groups are sometimes used in situations where there is one or zero ...


0

I'm Assuming your user will move from one question to another question/page with the help of a button, let's Call is 'Next'. All you have to do is rename you button as 'Skip' till the time when no check-boxes/radio boxes are selected. As soon as the user selects atleast an option the button changes to 'Next'. Note: Use the standard convention only, for ...


2

Have you considered putting each choice on a button and allowing the buttons to have distinctive depressed and undepressed images? Javascript coding them as you describe in option 3 would allow your users to choose zero to one of the provided options. Meanwhile, the use of buttons might make the hidden behaviour more intuitive.


2

This sounds like you're trying for a "none of the above" option. A simple radio button option at the end of the list would do just fine. No need to make things complicated. e.g. Which of the following is an animal? ( ) Tree ( ) Car ( ) Radiowave (o) None of the Above


0

As evil-closet-monkey already said: Don't hide functionality in shortcuts. Here's another idea that might work: The Link ist normally hidden and shows when the User hovers over the Text or the Textbox The user can click on the link at the right and everything deselects except the one where he clicked the link.


3

Don't hide functionality in shortcuts. If your user's work flow demands the need to quickly and easily deselect all options, make the option explicit. Provide a button that does what it says: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Now it is clear to the user how to deselect everything they've selected. A click of the ...


0

Alternatively maybe most people are willing to lend most of their books, but not the ones they are about to read... maybe you should ask them to select books they don't want to lend right now and auto lend the rest... Under the assumption most users only have a few books they know they don't want to part with right now. Include a search filter at the top to ...


-1

I would like to see checkbox where i can select multiple items (fruits). Everyone loves fruits and they might love more than 1 or 2 fruits. So, I prefer checkbox. Radio buttons are used to get a single answer rather than multiple (Like yes/no, close ended questions). Hope this helps :)


4

I can't answer your direct question as to whether or not mixing radios and checkboxes in one list has any conclusive testing data. But I will say it's not something I've seen. I'd suggest considering some alternatives. Visually separate the 'none of the above' checkbox from the rest Select the fruit you like: [ ] apples [ ] bananas [ ] oranges ...


0

An option I encountered today is to make the "none of the above" option a radio button, like so: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups When the radio button is selected, the checkboxes become deselected, and when the checkboxes are selected, the radio becomes deselected.


19

I haven’t seen user testing data on this, but there’s an existing pattern that appears to work very well. In the course of on-boarding a new user profile, Netflix allows the user to select movies that he wants to watch or likes: Notice the top row. The left item is selected, the middle item is in the hover state, and the right item is unselected. Also ...


0

Here is a fun idea -- 3 columns, on the left there are the ones to lend on the right ones not to lend, in the center undecided. At the start just the center is populated. The user can click on the left or the right and the item will animate over to the new list. The list continues off the bottom of the screen. As the left and the right fill up they will ...


1

Have you seen the newly released Apple music app. When you enter the app for the first time Apple Music asks you to select a few artists out of group and then select a few genre out of a group. I guess your requirement matches a lot with them. And believe me they have done it really well. You can try that kind of interface with some tweaks. Apple brings a ...


8

I can think of three improvements: Adding a filter Adding some order Improving scannability The filter is the easy one but I don't have a win-win idea for the other two, anyway I'll present some alternatives: If you're betting on text... Something that could help to searchability is alphabetical separation, maybe together with an index to each ...


1

I feel as though you might be jamming too many visual cues into the same screen. I think it should be broken out into steps: Step 1 Would you like to lend any of your books at this time? (Sharing is Caring!) Yes | No Step 2 - Yes Below are some books which you have already finished. Tap on each one which you would like to lend. Book | Book | Book ...


41

One way of making a selection task less tedious is by increasing the selection target size to the full image + text size (e.g., as in the attached mockup). This decreases the effort that goes into individual selection and can provide an appealing and easy to see overview on which books are selected. Additionally, you can distributed the 100 books over ...


5

The way you have it mocked up isn't bad. I mean, if I know my task is to go through my entire library and select loan-able books, then I expect I'll have to go through my whole library. I'd expect to see a page full of my books. I would, though, make each item larger (showing them in 4 or even 3 columns) and make the clickable area bigger than that little ...


7

You can always suggest some books for the user to lend and communicate that he or she can choose more later. It will successfully onboard the user and not overwhelm with too many choices. The criteria by witch the books are suggested really depends on the purpose of the application (I particularly like Adam's idea of date last read).


2

In case of multiple options, categorization always helps the user to make a decision. Netflix/Hulu do this really well and it becomes easy for you to select a title. Although, the use case is bit different here, but it more or less fits for your problem. You can categorize books by Genre, Rating, Recently read, Reading, etc. You can use a book API to ...


2

It's important to provide user a way to apply context to their list of books in order to help them make an informed and easier decision. Offering filters to help users sort by "date last read" or "genre" might help aid their decision making process. A user will be more likely to select all the books they haven't read in a year, or if they aren't reading ...


1

You can use a small tick mark that appears for some seconds after the user press enter to save the new value.


0

You can show a small banner with a feedback message like "Your settings have been saved". This banner can auto-dismiss after 2-3 seconds. As an example, you can check out the banners that Gmail displays when a user deletes email or performs some other actions.


0

You can show confirmation popup on the top with message like "LTR order is ON" or something like that, but usually if there is no confirmation button user understand that all settings are automatically saved.


2

Accessible checkboxes usually require two operations to control: first the user needs to 'focus' the checkbox (usually by using the 'tab' key to move through the interface until they reach the right control) and then they need to change the state of the checkbox (usually using the 'space' key). Sighted users will skip through the page using visual cues such ...


2

I am just going to throw that in there, as I cannot actually say any of this with confidence or base this on any factual knowledge. My guess is that they want to circumvent liability, that is, nowadays it is so common to skip these agreements that chances are (again I am not a lawyer, I am completely out of my depth here) somebody is actually going to be ...



Top 50 recent answers are included