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2

From "Checkboxes vs. Radio Buttons" (J. Nielsen, 2004): Radio buttons are used when there is a list of two or more options that are mutually exclusive and the user must select exactly one choice. In other words, clicking a non-selected radio button will deselect whatever other button was previously selected in the list. Checkboxes are used ...


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The reason to change this is pretty obvious: users are likely to think that they can edit the information when it looks like that. They will be confused, and they might even think your app is "broken" when they try to select or unselect a checkbox and it doesn't work. If you replaced the checkbox with a green check mark that had no box around it, it would ...


1

In his book, "GUI Bloopers 2.0" Jeff Johnson describes negative checkboxes as a design blooper and should be avoided. You could argue possible scenarios to use them. Most of the time however, they tend to make more sense to the programmer and just confuse the user. Best advice don't use them. You will have a better GUI if you just use positive ...


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Ask the user to strike out any unwanted option - this avoids the ambiguity of ticking a checkbox to remove an item, and is very easy and familiar on paper:


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I like your idea of offering three basic option groups, as it reduces the amount of thought the end user has to spend. It works for cars, iPhones, just about anything. If you want to offer a fourth, "a la carte" option, be careful that your regular users don't jump to it by default. You might show it like this: download bmml source – ...


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... bizarre behavior - a list of checkboxes, last selected of which can not be unselected. There is nothing stopping the user from unselecting all checkboxes, unless you force that situation. You shouldn't force that situation. Going with the assumption that a confirmation action is required to commit the information, that action simply need not be ...


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This is where validation comes into play. It's a tricky subject but almost every app of meaningful size has some kind of validation. In your case, I would recommend something like this. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If they then attempt to move on, save, navigate away or whatever else, you prevent them from ...


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Context might be a consideration in this debate rather than focusing purely upon the control itself. The context might be a long data-heavy survey intended to be filled in with a keyboard, or it might be some user settings on an app destined for mobile or touchscreen devices. Each situation may call for something different to enable the best user ...


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The IOS way of saying yes and no also is a little unclear to me. I use checkboxes when I have a YES/NO or AGREE/DISAGREE situation such as this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups For a toggle, I use a selection between two situations in equal weight such as: ASCENDING / DESCENDING; or WOMAN / MAN download ...


7

This has been discussed in much depth in many other related questions (see right pane on this page). So I'll make it brief. Toggle switches are anti-usability Despite their relative popularity (eg, Apple use them as a standard interface control) toggle switches have an inherent state-action ambiguity; that is, it is unclear whether the label ('on' for ...


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To decrease the upfront cognitive load, and guide the user on optimal course, I would recommend the initial upload dialog not having a prompt about file saving at all. Rather have the confirmation message explain system state, and allow for fine grained control if required. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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There's only one idea that's clearly different from the other ones, B. I often too, overlook the checkbox entirely (not that I really miss it, with chrome storing all my passwords). It's the most common design pattern yet, to me (and you), it just doesn't feel like good UX. As I mentioned, my choice would be B. Checkboxes are easy to miss as they might not ...


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EDIT: Check the end for the final verdict, and my favorite option. If it doesn't impact site performance or otherwise negatively influence anything on your site, and you're not worried about server space, you could simply have the checkbox with a default checked state/attribute, and the user would have to uncheck the box in order for the file not to be ...


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Those are all good options. How about just "Save" and on click of Save, show user a dialog box to save the files for future use (with remember this option). Especially in a mobile experience, user would rather have a dialog than see multiple buttons on the same page that he most likely will not notice.


2

I don't think you should base UX on what pleases you. What will most users understand? The way Microsoft does it is what most users will understand. I think a gray check is more intuitive but I went with the way Microsoft does it. I am responsible for an app that is in an industry that is not computer savvy and have these battles with marketing all the ...



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