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Sounds like you need a list. Selection of item in the list is like selecting a check-box in your example. User can use CTRL and SHIRT to select multiple items (or clear selection of some). You can provide shortcut buttons on top of the list for Select All, Clear All.


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You could do what OSX Finder or Windows Explorer do, which is click selects one and using CTRL + click allows multiple selection. In Windows 8 for touch interface if clicking the row body, it's a single selection. But on the leftmost side there are checkboxes to make multiple selections. If after several checkboxes have been selected the user clicks on a ...


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Why not use the space that the radio/checkbox switch would occupy for a drop-down combo-box? The checkbox array already serves to show all options at once and you don't have a chance of momentary confusion for people temporarily thinking the radios are checkboxes and vice versa.


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There are several ways to tackle the problem. First, I do want to mention that you should validate the assumption that one would, in fact, test things out. Really consider if just keeping with the checkbox isn't the solution already. If you aren't really solving a pain-point to begin with, I don't think its really worth trying to fix something that ain't ...


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Adding complexity to the interaction does not help the user's work flow for a limited use case. TL;DR: Don't flip between check boxes and radio buttons. Doing so just adds unnecessary controls and complexity. Understand the work flow. Don't just think about all the possible interaction scenarios and come up with a solution. Understand the user's actual ...


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The simple answer Changing the input type seems reasonable for this scenario. Just give users a switch so they can easily initiate the change. Alternate source selection controls On the topic of alternate control types (discussed in the comments), here's the scrolling selector box I referenced. Similar to a dropdown, but persistently exposed. I think ...


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Though there has been a lot of focus on language in the other answers (which is an important consideration), I believe that the key focus should be on heuristics (this Smashing Magazine article provides a great introduction into heuristics). The Default Effect For your question it's very important to consider the default effect, in that people have the ...


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Instead of checkbox you can try with the toggle switches(on/off). Now days most the forms you find this kind of options. Please have a look at the below images to get an idea. ![toggle switch][2]


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Labels for check-boxes should always be phrased in a positive/active way. As a rule of thumb, consider your alternative without the verbs: comments in this post It’s obvious that an empty check-box next to this label means ‘disable’ (or ‘forbid’) and a filled one stands for ‘allow’ (or ‘enable’). You may make it explicit for sure – you may even be ...


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Think of it via the form perspective. Checkboxes are commonly used to add to the existing form (ex: add me to your newsletter, remember me, etc). So in the perspective it should be "add comments to your post" where a check will enable it. Putting disable with a check is kind of contradictory: I'm "adding" a disable? Also to add to what you're asking ...


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Possitive wording The general rule is that positive wording is better in general since it's easier to interpret and tends to be shorter which is always good in checkboxs' labels. Microsoft agrees with these in their guidelines. If it is the case of a blogpost, I think it's not a big deal, since users should later be able to delete the comments and ...


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So far, a simple radio button could suffice: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups If we would know more about the problem, that could help. Edit: Based on your comment above, perhaps a "Split dropdown button" like solution would suffice... It might get confused with a combobox, should be usability tested (depends ...


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Layout A, is flawed with the radio button group almost blending in with the checkbox groups below it, with no apparent separation (horizonal line etc.) Layout B requires more input from user, but is laid out almost like a tree with indenting to separate the parent and children. Understanding the application is essential, where as convenience is a second ...



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