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3

I'm not sure if it applies to your case since I don't know what are your axises measuring, but I'd use something like a bullet graph designed by Stephen Few for cases that seems to cover yours, see below: Overview The bullet graph was developed to replace the meters and gauges that are often used on dashboards. Its linear and no - frills design ...


2

Iterate and test JeromeR is right on track with the general approach. Experiment with possible data sets and ways to visualize them, then ask yourself and others what best tells the story. Just like anything else in our business, user testing is key. There's one other important point that shouldn't be missed ... Visualizations should expand understanding ...


6

Your question is about information design. First, if this topic interests you greatly, I recommend you find The visual display of quantitative information by Tufte. His books are beautifully illustrated but expensive—so check your local library first or get your employer to buy you this book. Tufte will get you thinking about the design of charts and graphs ...


3

The 0-value x/y axis (chart B) is such a standard charting convention that it's often presumed. Users just glancing at chart A would likely assume that any point above the x axis represents a positive value, which in this case would be an incorrect reading. While chart A is slightly cleaner aesthetically (no overlapping lines), I think the risk of confusing ...


1

Under most circumstances, if you're dealing with a linear scale, always keep the zero mark directly on the axis. Reason: The main purpose of a multi-line graph is to allow the reader to view and compare the values of different items across a variable, typically time. When 0 is on the axis, the reader can eyeball how far different items are from the axis to ...


9

UX Horror: Making users think Here some reasons why it's bad: Color is not helping: It's very hard to tell just by looking at the Contacts chart if blue/green portion matches the number, there isn't any clear sign to indicate this. I think that colors don't make a big difference in this kind of chart where they don't have a direct relationship with ...


1

Your idea is fine, but the execution is unclear which makes it not fine. Your goal should always be to minimize the amount of cognitive load you put on the user, and employ as many natural associations that you'd like and expect an average, rational-enough user to perceive. That is to say, you want to make things obvious. Your current flaws are: This ...


3

I would consider making the non-focused figure gray like this: You might even consider maintaining only one color as well: Even if you do keep the colors different then I would make sure to make the active color thick enough to be obvious: If the mouseover switching occurs then it should be immediately obvious what is going on. Please ...



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