Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Here is how Michael Bostock, the creator of D3 language, is showing it: http://bl.ocks.org/mbostock/3035090 The gap is obvious and self-explanatory enough. I also like your own solution, but I would make the triangle light grey (#f3f3f3 or #dddddd), because red can be too distractive.


0

I saw a similar scenario in the book Super Graphic. There was a graph of incomes across several years, but one year, no data was reported. The author just left out that year, but reserved space to show the gap. I recreated the chart to be interactive in my job, so you can see how the final product looked. It is one way people have handled this for you ...


0

Leave it out. Be true to the data. If it is missing (and your scale starts at a non zero) leave it out. The white space is true to the data by showing a gap. Tufte says something to that effect when he talks about tabular data and whitespace. Sorry, I do not know the exact quote. Maybe someone else can research this. Check out his book if you have the $$$, ...


2

Even I'm facing same issue in the analytics product I'm working on now. My line of thinking is Use solid base line(axis) for all the positions/bars which represent data existence. Use dotted base line for all the positions where data is missing as shown in the Mockup below:- Highlight the axis label where there is dotted line and provide tooltip info ...


2

Do not display days with missing data, at the X-axis add three dots when the days are not continuous. See image below :


0

You may use stacked bars. Use white for no plan, green for on plan and red for off plan. Use a tooltip to show the actual value when the user moves the mouse on a bar. See picture below :


1

Communication which quadrant is desirable is not really the job of the chart. You'd need to decorate the axis or chart in some way. However keeping the quadrants and colours that you already have is fine for a western audience. Why not a bubble chart download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


5

I would use a heatmap here. Heatmap is, essentially, colored cells behind the values. Intensity of color shows how big the value is.


0

We dealt with this question at my job recently and we used multiple charts in a dashboard design at first. This made it very clear what data set you were viewing, since each chart had a prominent title. In a later iteration, we switched to a solution similar to tabs: a dropdown menu to select a metric. The switch made it easier for users on mobile devices ...


0

First, auxiliary lines of the legend are a great help. Vertical: in your exemplary case I wouldn't bother about vertical lines, since the step is pretty clear — it's 0.5, but if you look at the Dow Jones chart, you can see they could be really helpful for the user to follow the days. With candlesticks chart vertical lines of legend can interfere with ...


2

I think you're right to be mildly concerned about mixing the units, and even if you could label the Y axis, it wouldn't make the problem go away. If you want to remain consistent in your units, breaking things out into tabs is a reasonable option, though it does detract from the 'at-a-glance' value of the data display. Creating tabs gives you a couple ...


2

Combining two types of data in one chart makes it difficult to read and understand at a glance. If you really have to keep them in one chart, consider using a visibly different display type - e.g. a bar chart to display kilograms and line chart to plot centimeters. A nice example could be seen here: Highcharts dual axes demo, also pictured below: Note ...



Top 50 recent answers are included