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My suggestions: Color is a powerful tool, but you can add some labels. Don’t rely on color alone to deliver the informations; Choose colors that varies also in brightness. You can use soft colors to display most information and bright/dark colors to highlight information that requires more attention; To guarantee that most people who are colorblind can ...


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There are a few fancy solutions here but, based on the data you presented, I think the best option is probably a Dual-Y Column Chart. Since the graduations for both Client Health and Call Quality are effectively the same ('Good', 'Fair', 'Poor', 'Unknown') you can easily represent both of these values on the Y axis without causing confusion with scales. ...


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Bubble chart Put Client Health and Quality on the x and y axes. Each Call Type is represented by a bubble in the resulting coordinate system, i.e. a circle whose radius is relative to the total amount of such calls. You can add some labels or colors to indicate the “good” and “poor” areas of the sector. Instead of actual circles you could also scale icons ...


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Have you considered splitting the information into several charts? The current chart looks sophisticated, which may show that you are clever and have great data analyzing skills. However, it may be hard to read by your intended audiences. The whole purpose for us to do the data analysis is for other people to understand the data, not to show that we can ...


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Sounds like you want a stacked percentage chart. This can be either a bar chart, or a line-based one.


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I think this is the only visualisation that meets your need for Case 1. Here you can clearly see a declining pattern: Your case 2 is more difficult to solve using this pattern because now you are looking to compare 4 things and the stacked bar approach does come with some challenges when it comes to comparing a trend over time. Consider this example - you ...



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