New answers tagged

3

I'm pretty sure that has to do with the side of the road you drive on. You didn't specify which Asian countries, but as a quick test I looked at Chinese car interiors (wheel on left) and Japanese ones (wheel on right), and that conforms to right/left side of the road. Red = Right on road, Blue = Left on road. Via wikipedia. The question then becomes: 'why ...


0

This is a historical issue that goes back to horse-drawn coaches. In the UK, coaches would pass on the left so that the coachman (driver) could fend off any attack from the passing coach with their stronger right arm. (Why do some countries drive on the left and others on the right?) In the US (and other countries) The idea was that if coaches passed on ...


1

History and origin In the late 1700s, however, teamsters in France and the United States began hauling farm products in big wagons pulled by several pairs of horses. These wagons had no driver’s seat; instead the driver sat on the left rear horse, so he could keep his right arm free to lash the team. Since he was sitting on the left, he ...


1

It is simply that countries where you drive on the right side of the road the driver will be positioned on left side of the car. Countries where you drive on the left side of the road the driver will be on the right. In effect this means that in countries with right-hand traffic, the driver and the vehicle controls would normally be located on the ...


-1

I personally don't care for the touch screens at all. Having been an accident investigator, I can see the as quite a distraction. I have driven a number of cars with the touch screen feature and they are a distraction. What really gripes me is that most manufacturers are making them standard equipment and not giving the buyer a choice. We usually get a ...


4

This almost-locked state is certainly not user friendly when you're not driving. However, when you're in an accident that causes the car to flip over a couple of times, it may cause the first door lock state to fail. If there was no second lock state, you would fall out of the car while it's spinning. In short: the semi-closed state is a backup safety ...


0

My Honda Insight beeps when you leave the car lights on. Which helps, but man, so much beeping in the world today, its practically background noise. Like thousands of other people yesterday, I left the lights on and needed a jump in the morning. Baffled at how a car that can stop and start the engine at a stop sign, can't detect the combination of ...


6

It gives the car more symmetry which has aesthetical, structural and usability benefits. Aside from the symmetry there are some other benefits too. Aesthetical: Humans like symmetry, it's that simple. With a top-swing you can put one hinge left, one right, and the handle in the middle. And when opened the (a)symmetry is even more noticeable. Usability: ...


4

It is simply more convenient to open upward as opposed of outward, it can pose as a physical barrier preventing loading from the side and can be impeded from fully opening. Which small SUVs have a back door that opens to the side? There are a few design characteristics that, in our opinion, make a swing-gate less desirable than the liftgate alternative, ...


1

Originally, trunks on cars were exactly that: wooden trunks strapped onto the back of the car. The pattern seems to have stuck to a great extent simply because there don't appear to be any advantages to changing it. There are some variations: A few supercars where the trunk is at the front of the car and, although still opening upwards, hinges at the ...


2

Why limit the side of the car or the angle at which you can place something in the trunk? You are never going to be on top of the car but you might be on either side/ behind the car reaching into the trunk. My opinion was clearly the car manufacturer that made the sideways trunk was trying to be different or gimmicky and now the user only has 2 directions @ ...



Top 50 recent answers are included