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8

There is one big upside to auto-scroll that you missed: Visitors may not be captured by what you consider the main feature items. Moving through a varied selection of samples may help broaden your reach and tame your bounce rate a bit. It's a site by site, page by page decision. If there isn't too much to take in on the page and the carousel is the primary ...


4

According the opinion that carousels are evil and one should not use them, regardless of what the customer thinks, the conclusion is: "Longer is better". The ideal time is "infinity" (i.e. don't use carousel). If you are forced to use some finite time, then make is as longer as possible without getting fired.


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Most people seem to agree on the common sense of a maximum around 5 images, but agree that less is better where possible. Jakob Neilsen suggests 5 because: it’s unlikely users will engage with more than that. It can be taxing to swipe through many frames on a mobile device, and it’s difficult for users to recognize topics they have already viewed when a ...


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Really carousels are a mean like another to display content and its use depends on context. Like always when talking about UX and UI. Effectiveness of carousels can only be judged regarding to a context. Experienced web users (I am pretty sure most IT workers are not) may be more eager to use carousels since they know how to interact with them. But a ...


2

No. There is no way you can predict how long each user will want to look at each slide, control should be in the hands of the user and moving things are distracting. Give control to the user and let them look if they are interested, make the contents interesting enough to entice them and provide obvious clues that there is more to look at.


2

Have the options to flick through the carousel but not auto slide - maybe the most important click through or link to content on the first slide and let the user perform the click through's if they want to. We have a similar scenario with our corporate site, we aren't selling anything per se, but want to improve the landing page aesthetically. Good piece ...


2

What really fascinates me, is that even SlideDeck - provider of a wordpress plugin for carousels - uses a video instead of a carousel on their homepage. Seems like they also found out that carousels aren't so effective in terms of conversion optimization. Edit: I just found some really interesting research from Nielsen about the topic.


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Not sure how flexiable you are with modifying the UI, but in order to save space, I suggest having the first tier selections a drop down list so the second tier result would depend on what you've selected from the drop list. The second tier items are now in a fixed height area where you can scroll to view more. I chose this metheod because this would also ...


1

Can you be more specific as to what your top level items are? But maybe you cannot disclose that. You will need to implement a portrait and a landscape version of your view. In either case, don't use horizontal scrolling. Our "eye-brains" automatically yearn for a vertical presentation when we know that there are tons of items to choose from. Your small ...


1

According to research done by NN Group, and as per answers in similar existing questions , generally carousels are implemented in a manner that is not very user friendly. The problem with carousels (whether auto-scrolling or not) is that it's very easy for content to be missed by the user. One of the few appropriate uses for carousels are when you are ...


1

Yes and No. Animating stuff does have a distraction effect. You may adjust the transition style to be smoother, but still, peripheral vision is sharper to detect moves. So, why Yes? Because the distraction effect may be what you're looking for. An animated carousel will allow user to understand obviously that there are several contents available. And you ...


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First of all you need to decide the pace of rotation for the carousel. I have seen an increasing trend in sites where the image/content stays for longer durations 15-30 seconds. JonW pointed out some stats behind the usage of carousels: Approximately 1% of visitors click on a feature. There was a total of 28,928 clicks on features for this time period. ...


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Put the Add button only on the last slide, perhaps? As I see it, your metaphor "Fill this empty space" is at the same time mistakingly cuing that the existing items run empty already at the first page. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You could also add the Add Item control to the control area of the carousel, ...


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In television production, standard "hold" time for on-screen copy is 2x reading speed. In other words, if you have a block of copy on the screen, it should stay on the screen long enough to quickly read it through twice. This is to allow time for orientation, focusing on the text and slow readers. That being said, a web page is much different than a ...


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This is difficult to answer without more info on the carousel content, as others have said. I also agree with the comment on using reading time as a rule of thumb, if text is involved. One additional answer could be to do a usability study (potentially with eye tracking data if you have access to those tools). You could set all transitions to be manually ...


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From my own experience in looking at the analytics data of sites I've created, I can say that most users don't interact with a carousel, much less convert from one. I have noticed recently that a number of sites that used to have carousels no longer have them and are instead showing just one "panel" (if you look at the HTML, there's still remnants of a ...



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