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4

Most people seem to agree on the common sense of a maximum around 5 images, but agree that less is better where possible. Jakob Neilsen suggests 5 because: it’s unlikely users will engage with more than that. It can be taxing to swipe through many frames on a mobile device, and it’s difficult for users to recognize topics they have already viewed when a ...


4

An important factor to consider is the audience of the application (or website). It seems that typically, many younger audiences (or those familiar with touch devices) are used to swiping across carousels. If you look core applications of iOS (and I'm assuming Android as well), you'll find that carousels support swiping to switch to the next image. However, ...


3

Have the options to flick through the carousel but not auto slide - maybe the most important click through or link to content on the first slide and let the user perform the click through's if they want to. We have a similar scenario with our corporate site, we aren't selling anything per se, but want to improve the landing page aesthetically. Good piece ...


2

Not sure how flexiable you are with modifying the UI, but in order to save space, I suggest having the first tier selections a drop down list so the second tier result would depend on what you've selected from the drop list. The second tier items are now in a fixed height area where you can scroll to view more. I chose this metheod because this would also ...


2

Personally, I would implement a 3rd party tool like PhotoSwipe. iPhone, iPad, Android, Blackberry 6 and Desktop all supported. Take a look at their video demo. What is it? PhotoSwipe is a FREE HTML/CSS/JavaScript based image gallery specifically targeting mobile devices. Who is it for? Developers and designers requiring an interactive image ...


1

If they are touching a different area I suspect you can use the same gesture for both. As to the question of if this will confuse the users, I would say it depends on how its set up. Carousels are often interacted with in the left / right manner because they re-enforce with graphics the mental model of having to go left / right in a stack of images. Going ...


1

The fact that you want to use a "tutorial" to explain the gestures, which could provoke a "wrong" behaviour, if made on the carousel, seems to me to be a design smell. I agree, lots of users know the "swipe-to-get-back" gesture, but I think you should still provide a back link. Have a look the the iOs mail app. They provide the gesture and a button too. The ...


1

If the carousel is intended to showcase products, a user will need to use images, but to show, for example: customer reviews or services, an image may not be required to supplement the text.


1

The problem with carousels is that you are not going to display an attractive or wanted item to every visitor. The percentage conversion rates probably match: A person who saw the offer and was not interested Someone who likes offers but didn't wait for the carousel to complete its cycle Someone who saw the offer, was interested, but wasn't in a position ...


1

Maybe something like one full-width image below which put thumbnails, say, in the grid 3 images per row. Default display first one, change displayed image as user picks other thumb. However, it depends on a context. What's been written above is good for images of hotel rooms or images of users.


1

There's a lot to be said for the swipe idiom over buttons. It might seem like the physical action of a tap is quicker and easier than a swipe, but that assumption ignores Fitts's Law, or its touchscreen equivalent: the smaller a target is, the longer it will take for the user to hit it. You can do a swipe without looking, but to hit a button you have to ...


1

From my own experience in looking at the analytics data of sites I've created, I can say that most users don't interact with a carousel, much less convert from one. I have noticed recently that a number of sites that used to have carousels no longer have them and are instead showing just one "panel" (if you look at the HTML, there's still remnants of a ...


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Can you be more specific as to what your top level items are? But maybe you cannot disclose that. You will need to implement a portrait and a landscape version of your view. In either case, don't use horizontal scrolling. Our "eye-brains" automatically yearn for a vertical presentation when we know that there are tons of items to choose from. Your small ...


1

According to research done by NN Group, and as per answers in similar existing questions , generally carousels are implemented in a manner that is not very user friendly. The problem with carousels (whether auto-scrolling or not) is that it's very easy for content to be missed by the user. One of the few appropriate uses for carousels are when you are ...



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