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8

Depends on the goal. What are you trying to accomplish exactly? In the lobby the expectation (I assume) is that your employees breeze by while visitors grab a seat and wait for their appointments. If so, then there are a couple of questions to ask: Do visitors already know about your company/organization? If not, what information do you want to relay that ...


6

Q: How many images must be in a carousel so that the user can see all of it? A: 1 In an interesting blog post about carousel interaction stats, Eric Runyon collected data on carousel interactions for various ND.edu web pages. What he found is that effectively users only interact with the first item in the carousel: A concise analysis of this data:


4

I don't think most websites are trending away from accordions towards carousels. Sites are trending away from carousels, and they are also trending away from accordions (if I were to speculate, perhaps at a slower rate). Disadvantages You asked specifically for potential disadvantages of using accordions instead of carousels, so: If you need to present ...


4

An important factor to consider is the audience of the application (or website). It seems that typically, many younger audiences (or those familiar with touch devices) are used to swiping across carousels. If you look core applications of iOS (and I'm assuming Android as well), you'll find that carousels support swiping to switch to the next image. However, ...


3

Show him this website: http://shouldiuseacarousel.com/ There are a couple of reasons why he shouldn´t do that. 1% clicked a feature. Of those, 89% were the first position. 1% of clicks for the most significant object on the home page? nd.edu stats by @erunyon “We have tested rotating offers many times and have found it to be a poor way of presenting home ...


2

Personally, I would implement a 3rd party tool like PhotoSwipe. iPhone, iPad, Android, Blackberry 6 and Desktop all supported. Take a look at their video demo. What is it? PhotoSwipe is a FREE HTML/CSS/JavaScript based image gallery specifically targeting mobile devices. Who is it for? Developers and designers requiring an interactive image ...


2

The only advantage of a slider over next/previous navigation is the possibility to jump (seemingly) freely to any index. In reality this would hardly work, as the user cannot distinguish the individual index locations and needs to hunt for the right position, even if they remember the general direction. Thus, I'd classify the slider the same as indexable ...


2

Assuming the number is greater than what you can show at a given time i would favor infinite or a looping pattern. However I would make sure to give them some contextual clue of the state of the system. Let them know that they are going to loop back around to the begining. I dislike carousels where I think haven't I seen that before and realized it was ...


1

User need to know how many box he has. You can implement something as infinite but with the number of box displayed under the carousel pictures. (or somewhere else) The infinite approach will stay disruptive and if you have a certain amount of box, display them like they are : limited.


1

A carousel is an animated content. Therefore, you have to be aware that it will bother the readability of the other informations on the page. That being said, using a carousel, there is no straight answer to your questions. The reading time depends of the content complexity. A quite good pattern consists into pausing the animation on mouse over (with a ...


1

Go with a list. This is a job listing page and the slider will infuriate people as they'll want to scan information quickly to pick out the job titles that suit them. A compromise might be to have a featured jobs slider with 3 or so featured jobs at the top of the page? That might satisfy your colleague but mean that the bulk of the information is easily ...


1

Your photo galleries look very nice ... Regarding your question, I would simply employ standard controls that you find on a lot of other image sliders such as pause/play buttons with next/previous buttons. No need to re-invent the wheel, image sliders are pretty common these days and most people are used to seeing them. I would just make sure to design ...


1

The best solution here is to put control in the hands of the user. Give them buttons to slide from left to right and discover the images, in either direction, at their own pace. Simplify the interface with two large, clear, clickable (desktop), tappable (touch screen), and keyboard navigable (for accessibility) action buttons that load either the next or ...


1

"Carousels exist to keep people from beating the $*&# out of each other in meetings." -- Brad Frost Problem: The home page isn't big enough to show all the stuff for sale. Solution: Recommend the top selling item with easy access to the full list.


1

Having 3 sliders is not a bad idea here. Having a single big slider is! Whenever someone comes to your website to purchase anything, he/she would have a product in mind to buy, the three distinct sliders will nicely categorize items. So when, I for example am visiting your website to find discounted deals for t-shirts on your website a single carousel will ...


1

Maybe something like one full-width image below which put thumbnails, say, in the grid 3 images per row. Default display first one, change displayed image as user picks other thumb. However, it depends on a context. What's been written above is good for images of hotel rooms or images of users.


1

There's a lot to be said for the swipe idiom over buttons. It might seem like the physical action of a tap is quicker and easier than a swipe, but that assumption ignores Fitts's Law, or its touchscreen equivalent: the smaller a target is, the longer it will take for the user to hit it. You can do a swipe without looking, but to hit a button you have to ...


1

If they are touching a different area I suspect you can use the same gesture for both. As to the question of if this will confuse the users, I would say it depends on how its set up. Carousels are often interacted with in the left / right manner because they re-enforce with graphics the mental model of having to go left / right in a stack of images. Going ...


1

The fact that you want to use a "tutorial" to explain the gestures, which could provoke a "wrong" behaviour, if made on the carousel, seems to me to be a design smell. I agree, lots of users know the "swipe-to-get-back" gesture, but I think you should still provide a back link. Have a look the the iOs mail app. They provide the gesture and a button too. The ...


1

If the carousel is intended to showcase products, a user will need to use images, but to show, for example: customer reviews or services, an image may not be required to supplement the text.


1

The problem with carousels is that you are not going to display an attractive or wanted item to every visitor. The percentage conversion rates probably match: A person who saw the offer and was not interested Someone who likes offers but didn't wait for the carousel to complete its cycle Someone who saw the offer, was interested, but wasn't in a position ...


1

Like @JonW said, carousels are notorious for their 1-3% (or even lower) conversion or click-through-rate. In my time as UX designer at a ecommerce business, most conversion was generated by the search functionality that was displayed front and center on every page. Although carousels have are great on a design level, they save space and it's a big canvas ...



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