Hot answers tagged

17

Visible not prominent Within a given component, help users know what to expect by visualizing app state. IOW, keep the arrow visible but clearly inactive. This way users will know where to find it at a glance and will have visual confirmation that the carousel is at the beginning/end. There has to be a better term for this but, recognition over recall ...


14

Q: How many images must be in a carousel so that the user can see all of it? A: 1 In an interesting blog post about carousel interaction stats, Eric Runyon collected data on carousel interactions for various ND.edu web pages. What he found is that effectively users only interact with the first item in the carousel: A concise analysis of this data:


4

I agree that carousel is not the best pattern in some cases, however when it is used ... What are the best practices and why? I've always been under an assumption that: If a carousel is endless (continues to scroll from last page to first) then you keep the buttons enabled ALWAYS. If there is no page / items to scroll to, then you still display the ...


4

I don't think most websites are trending away from accordions towards carousels. Sites are trending away from carousels, and they are also trending away from accordions (if I were to speculate, perhaps at a slower rate). Disadvantages You asked specifically for potential disadvantages of using accordions instead of carousels, so: If you need to present ...


3

To save some space on scrolling I'd suggest using an even thumbnails grid if the images are of same size or a "magazine layout" (think Pinterest gridlike mobile layout) for images of varied length. Magazine layout allows some space to add image description/metadata, so you don't have to employ accordion for that. See image.


2

Assuming the number is greater than what you can show at a given time i would favor infinite or a looping pattern. However I would make sure to give them some contextual clue of the state of the system. Let them know that they are going to loop back around to the begining. I dislike carousels where I think haven't I seen that before and realized it was ...


2

The only advantage of a slider over next/previous navigation is the possibility to jump (seemingly) freely to any index. In reality this would hardly work, as the user cannot distinguish the individual index locations and needs to hunt for the right position, even if they remember the general direction. Thus, I'd classify the slider the same as indexable ...


1

It has to be either Option 1 or Option 2. Which one depends on what it is that the user sees when tapping on 'previous' or 'next'. If they see another product, then it's Option 1. If the see another category, then it's Option 2. Anything else would create confusion for the user.


1

In my opinion the best practice depends on the modality. If you have inferiority-superiority (e.g. car upgrade in games) then the ends shall be blocked for good. If there is merely a difference in qualities (e.g. classes and races in games) then an open-ended solution is the best practice.


1

Ask Yourself What is the primary purpose of the page your user is currently on? What are they trying to accomplish while they are there? Size often dictates importance/relevance, and the "Do you know?" is taking up a large chunk of real estate. Other popular social sites don't clutter their "edit/update" profile UI with CTAs to other functionality. ...


1

I guess you might be interested in an existing implementation of carousels for questions. Just hover the animated showcase of how Foursquare has already implemented the same. This looks good. They have a position indicator telling you the number of remaining panes. On answering, control moves to the next question too. Overall, it is a different way but does ...


1

User need to know how many box he has. You can implement something as infinite but with the number of box displayed under the carousel pictures. (or somewhere else) The infinite approach will stay disruptive and if you have a certain amount of box, display them like they are : limited.


1

A carousel is an animated content. Therefore, you have to be aware that it will bother the readability of the other informations on the page. That being said, using a carousel, there is no straight answer to your questions. The reading time depends of the content complexity. A quite good pattern consists into pausing the animation on mouse over (with a ...


1

Go with a list. This is a job listing page and the slider will infuriate people as they'll want to scan information quickly to pick out the job titles that suit them. A compromise might be to have a featured jobs slider with 3 or so featured jobs at the top of the page? That might satisfy your colleague but mean that the bulk of the information is easily ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible