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110

Almost all of the testing I've managed has proven that content delivered via carousels are missed by most users. Few interact with them and many comment that they look like adverts — we've witnessed the banner blindness concept in full effect. In terms of space saving and content promotion, a lot of competing messages get delivered in a single position that ...


95

Carousels are effective at being able to tell people in marketing/senior management that their latest idea is now on the home page. They are next to useless for users and often "skipped" because they look like advertisements. Hence they are a good technique for getting useless information on a home page (see first sentence of this post). In summary, use ...


39

In all the testing I have done, home page carousels are completely ineffective. For one, anything beyond the initial view has a huge decrease in visitor interaction. And two, the chances that the information being displayed in the carousel matches what the visitor is looking for is slim. So in that case the carousel becomes a very large banner that gets ...


31

As a user I find carousels faintly annoying: Most have usability fail which I fall into the categories described in this article: 5 Big Usability Mistakes Designers Make on Carousels No ability to bookmark a particular item on the carousel, for example take a look at the BBC News photo carousel they use: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-14619799 ...


27

I do not use or suggest the use of carousels. The changing of images can distract users when they read text on the page. You might find some interesting information at http://digitaleskimo.tumblr.com/post/752912498/image-carousel-appropriateness http://blinkux.com/insights/newsletter/usability-highlights-2008/ does not dispute the use or causeless, but ...


21

Some research into Carousels usage on University of Notre Dame website has some interesting findings: Approximately 1% of visitors click on a feature. There was a total of 28,928 clicks on features for this time period. The feature was manually "switched/rotated" a total of 315,665 times. Of these clicks, 84% were on stories in position 1 with the rest ...


18

I added event tracking to the carousel navigation elements on our public site. Those that navigated the carousel overwhelmingly used the main side arrows. less than 10% used the bottom secondary navigation arrows. And practically no one <.5% clicked the dots. Dots may have some purpose of indicating how many slides (does that matter to people?) but ...


16

Whether you use a particular html feature or jquery widget or whatever really depends more on what problem you are trying to solve. Identify the problems to be solved, then design solutions to those problems. Don't just grab solutions as seen elsewhere and then just use them. Regarding sliders (aka carousels) ... Use when your problem is: you have a ...


15

We have built these for clients in the past with the main driving force being SEO. (Carousel images with text / links overlayed). They are a way to cram a lot of content onto the main homepage without looking like you are 'gaming' the search engines or keyword stuffing. We do try to make them as efficient and usable as possible, but they are requested by ...


14

I was going to make this a comment but actually I think this is an answer. Pause on hover doesn't work for mobile - and web pages should be designed to work on mobile devices, so yes a pause button or mechanism is necessary that doesn't depend on hover. I cannot stress enough the importance of considering the mobile experience when designing for the web. ...


10

I find that dots are useful for showing progress, but they're way to small click targets to be usable for navigation. They're probably best suited for mobile applications like the iPhone home screen where a swipe is the means of changing slides: If you do decide to build a carousel, make your nav buttons BIG. Allow keyboard navigation for desktop users ...


8

I think carousels can be effective as long as they give control to the user. That is, they can skip ahead, direct the flow, know where they are in the carousel, and turn off an auto-play function. Here is more on this idea: http://uxmovement.com/navigation/big-usability-mistakes-designers-make-on-carousels/


8

There is one big upside to auto-scroll that you missed: Visitors may not be captured by what you consider the main feature items. Moving through a varied selection of samples may help broaden your reach and tame your bounce rate a bit. It's a site by site, page by page decision. If there isn't too much to take in on the page and the carousel is the primary ...


6

Horizontal accordions have one advantage over carousels in that they do provide a complete overview of available content, whereas carousels by design only hint at additional content. Accordions provide overarching structure, carousels focus on item level details. If your content has a meta-structure and is not simply a collection of items then use a ...


6

No, it's the other way around. As your having a carousel, there is a timing issue to address. The carousel switches images and users have to quickly click on the banner to get to the offer currently visible, before it swiches again. According to Fitts's Law, illustrated above, the time it takes a user to click an area is a function of distance and target ...


5

You could replace the arrows with a simple swipe control, implemented via JS. You could hint that more pages are available by providing 'peeks' of the two extra pages outside the viewport (so it appears the far edges of the previous and next images are just within sight). The big advantage of the swipe control is that it gives the user a large touch area to ...


5

If UI space is your issue, why not take inspiration from Jelly Bean's own minimal, and familiar, carousel indicator?


4

Having a link or button is always a good idea, because users know how they work. If you make the whole box clickable, some users might not be able to discover it. You should link the image as well. You might have an issue with smaller targets, such as links and buttons, if the carousel rotation is triggered by a timer, and you do not pause the rotation on ...


4

I don't have a definitive answer to your question, but there are two things to keep in mind: user control of the carousel's rotation and mobile-specific gotchas. User Control The Web Content Accessibility Guidlines (WCAG 2.0) are quite clear: users must have control over timed content: For any auto-updating information that (1) starts automatically and ...


4

Its going to be hard to represent a suitable solution unless we get an idea about the type of content you are going to show with the image since the size of the content could decide how much screen space could be shown. I am not a fan of using a carousal since its a one time view for a single image at one point and does not provide equal value to all ...


4

It isn't redundant. It's a function people already use on a regular basis. Don't over-think it. People are used to slide to the right, and people are used to see bullets on how far they have progressed. If you truly think it's redundant, than I would ditch the carousel, since I believe it's better suited for navigating to different destinations in your app ...


4

According the opinion that carousels are evil and one should not use them, regardless of what the customer thinks, the conclusion is: "Longer is better". The ideal time is "infinity" (i.e. don't use carousel). If you are forced to use some finite time, then make is as longer as possible without getting fired.


4

An important factor to consider is the audience of the application (or website). It seems that typically, many younger audiences (or those familiar with touch devices) are used to swiping across carousels. If you look core applications of iOS (and I'm assuming Android as well), you'll find that carousels support swiping to switch to the next image. However, ...


3

Perhaps it's worth coming at this from the other angle. You might ask yourself two questions to help answer this problem. The first is: do those links reduce usability in any way? From a usability perspective, they're entirely discoverable given that the primary purpose of the dots are to afford the carousel mechanism itself. Given that, I can't think of a ...


3

Having designed a lot of ecommerce websites I would say that carousels are effective. Specifically in getting users to view more main promotions. They are fun for users to interact with and improve the likeliness promos will actually be read or make an impact. I have used the free Professor Cloud javascript carousel successfully with features rotations as ...


3

Most people seem to agree on the common sense of a maximum around 5 images, but agree that less is better where possible. Jakob Neilsen suggests 5 because: it’s unlikely users will engage with more than that. It can be taxing to swipe through many frames on a mobile device, and it’s difficult for users to recognize topics they have already viewed when a ...


3

One of the fundament parts of smart phones is swipe gestures. This is especially with photos. Where as people will understand what you've done it will feel very much like a desktop site that's been fitted onto a mobile. There's easy enough jquery swipe plugins to use: http://stage.api.jquerymobile.com/swipe/ or http://stephband.info/jquery.event.swipe/


3

I feel your pain! I say just don't use one :) This article explains why sliders are a bad idea with great details and examples. Basically: Their movement distracts users away from your content People glaze over things that look like banners They have terrible usability--as you mention, they always seem to move just as you're trying to read something! ...


3

When you have a small amount of pages, like on your example, 5 page, that can fit in dots inside the content then you better use dots. The advantage is that the user can move quickly from page to page, and have better knowledge of where it is. When there's a large number of pages, eg imagine there are 12 dots, then it is better with the arrows. Many dots ...


2

Assuming you're "scrolling" or sliding the slides around it makes most sense to display all slides between point A and B; that's just how real-world objects like film reels work. This presents a problem however when you start scrolling between large amounts of slides. Try to keep a delay of under 500ms to avoid being too long and showy, and avoid too short ...



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