Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

36

Start working on your 10,000 hours any way you can. That means reading up on material concerning the field, diving in and applying for a job, hacking away at something as a hobby, keeping up with industry developments, paying attention to the thought leaders (eg. Jakob Nielsen, Jared Spool, Steve Krug, etc) and asking lots of questions. So I'd expect to see ...


32

I hired a new UX person last year, right out of school. Some highlights of my inspirational (imho) UX talk with him: Always be observing and analyzing. Why is the ceiling this tall? Who is that? Why do they do it that way? When do they decide this? How do they figure it out? Which? What? Never, ever, ever nod your head and say you got it when you ...


31

You'll probably get some excellent posts about resources etc, so I'm going to post as someone who has sat more on the hiring side of the fence for years. Regarding resume, cover letter, interview, phone screen, etc etc talk UX, not programming. If you send me a resume for a UX job or if we speak on the phone I'll have specific challenges in mind - I need ...


21

As a UX person who works in a situation like you describe (UX creates the specs, FE implements them), I can say that it is vitally important that my team know what is/is not possible when designing a UI. If something's completely impossible, we do our stakeholders a disservice by proposing it. On the other hand, given that only a few member of our team ...


17

I just hired a new UX person last week, right out of school. Some highlights of my inspirational (imho) UX talk with him: Always be observing and analyzing. Why is the ceiling this tall? Who is that? Why do they do it that way? When do they decide this? How do they figure it out? Which? What? Never, ever, ever nod your head and say you got it when ...


17

I say: 'I help companies make their software easier to use. Websites too.' And then if they look as if they're remotely interested after that point I move on to say something that most people identify with and that is: 'I bet you've come across software or a website that is really awkward or annoying to use - well I help companies make them more enjoyable ...


15

Short answer: "it depends". I've been wrestling with this question for about 2 years. Some things to think about: If you learn to code, you will spend a lot more time coding, and a lot less time designing. Muscles that you don't use will atrophy, and the ones you do use will build at the exclusion of others. UX is a craft and must be coupled with ...


15

Since you defined your question more clearly in the comments as relating to visual design, let me approach my answer from that perspective. Visual design as I tend to define it relates to how graphic design principles are used in interface design to support clarity, consistency, and simplicity in order to create UIs that are easy and enjoyable to use. ...


14

User Experience is a cross over field in that to do it well you can't be purely technical nor purely focused on artistic and human factors. You have to have skills from all sides and understand the interplay between them. When talking about websites and applications, to be good at UX you need to understand development and its related technologies. But you ...


13

This is something that keeps upsetting me. Both your question and almost all answers so far seem to be working under the assumption that UX people design products for the web. Hence, they "need to have basic knowledge of HTML, CSS and Javascript". Why is that? What about all those who design for desktop and mobile and various specialized platforms - from ...


13

Jon, you are not the first person I have seen who has skills in graphic design (print and web) and a degree in computer science, but with a passion for UX. By all means concentrate on aiming for a job in the UX field that you desire. However, do not dismiss jobs in the fields in which you have proven experience and qualifications, otherwise you may be ...


12

1) Be a life-long learner: Take every opportunity to add to your knowledge (workshops, books, conferences, courses) even after your official studies are done. 2) Mentoring: - Get a ux mentor: They can be an invaluable source of feedback and support for growth. Many ia/ux associations and groups can help connect mentors/protégés, e.g. IAI has an ...


12

Sounds like you have a strong foundation. Start learning all you can and become active in communities like this one. Study the Microsoft UX Guidelines and the Apple HIG, as they both offer a great starting point for what users have come to expect when using an interface. Visit sites like Quince and LukeW's site to brush up on common design patterns and why ...


11

I've been working as a PM for almost 15 years and have had the privilege of working with 20+ different UX designers during that time, and have seen many variations on the PM and design relationship. I've also faced the same problem you have of choosing between hiring a PM gneralist and UX specialist. Here's my advice: find a part-time UX designer (can be a ...


10

You need both. Books are great for learning the fundamentals and generally have a more through, thoguhtful approach. Books are also great as they more often provide research to back up their statements; sometimes good, academic HCI or psychological research, sometimes personal research or experience that they have found. Books will teach you the basics ...


10

What you need to learn If you want to become a designer, I can think of six major skills you'll need to master. Some of these you may have from your previous experience, others you might have to learn anew. Visual Communication: You need to learn how to convey meaning through graphics. You should also try to learn pitfalls in visual representation and how ...


9

You're doing a lot of things right, and there's more you do. For example: Get hands-on experience. Is there a possibility of a practicum or co-op opportunity through school? Or volunteer opportunities? Start building, or keep building, your portfolio (samples of your work). This is easier than you might think. For example, when you get assignments that ...


9

Contribute to open source projects. That's mostly how I gained knowledge and experience (and even scored a Web UX job straight from college with an AB Psychology degree, which many employers would consider to be unrelated) http://live.gnome.org/UsabilityProject https://launchpad.net/ayatana I would also suggest participating here in UXExchange, IxDA, and ...


9

I did the exact thing you are looking to do. I worked for years as a web designer and started adding the UX skills as it went along, seeing that this field was really opening up. I now work for a company that builds pretty complex software for the commercial insurance industry and find myself involved in listening to the business development people talk ...


8

Mostly agree with what Rahul said - but I'd like to especially emphasise one thing. Practice doing user experience work. Practice it a lot. Reading blogs, books, papers, and courses are all great. But knowing how to apply that knowledge is a different thing. The real learning comes when you try and apply your knowledge, make mistakes, and fix 'em. You ...


8

I agree with Rahul, some very good points there. Having a solid background as a developer helps me a lot during my work as a user experience designer (I used to develop websites, but quickly moved to UXD). You know the techniques (and their limitations) you work with. In my opinion this helps you design (technically) realistic products that are possible ...


8

There's only one way to become something: start doing it. Start designing user experiences and along the way you'll learn the "terminologies and technical things", although I'd have to argue those are pretty irrelevant in the grand scheme of things.


8

The thing that makes a great UX designer is this: Look around you. What do you see? Who made those things? Why did they make them that way? Why is the ceiling that tall? Who decided on the spacing of the boards in the floor? Why is the size of your pants measured in inches? Why is an inch exactly that long? Why did you want to buy that kind of dish ...


8

Here are some tips: 1. Know your self: Identify your core UX skills. You may be specilized in one or more of the following: concept design, interaction design, information architecture, graphic design depending on your school of training.IF you haven't already read Jessee James Garrett's 'The Elements of User Experience' and review the digram articulating ...


8

Can you be a Web and UX Designer or a Web Designer with UX skills? Yes. (Seems like I should elaborate. In general, there is no one definition for 'UX' designer. Yes, some do only wireframes. Some do wireframes and JS. Some do JS and icon design. Some do branding and user testing. Some do research and interviews. There's a large range of skills that ...


7

Product Manager typically has to answer to the company. So they are beholden to profits and losses. The UX designer is more beholden to the end user. Obviously, they are both beholden to both, but that's how I usually divy it up. Product Manager: This site needs to X Y and Z for the company. UX Designer: Let's figure out the best way to let our customer ...


7

I think the requirements list for quality UX folks should be this: care about the user expirience. That's it. If you do, you're qualified. I realize that's not how all HR departments feel, of course. At that point, your challenge is to just convince those that are hiring that you have a passion for this type of work. It sounds like you do. Regarding ...


7

Anything that could represent your knowledge in Information Architecture and User Experience is perfectly valid portfolio material. It doesn't really matter what's in the portfolio as long as the consumer of the content understand how great you are, and why it would be a loss NOT to hire you. So, yes, Wireframes, Mockups, Use cases, Requirement analysis, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible