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1

You say this so that users know why they have to do the test. It's irrelevant if bots can read it or not. When selecting a language on a web page - I don't understand what language 官話 is (and I don't have to), but a Chinese/Mandarin speaking user would find it useful.


0

The phrase is as user friendly as any explanation/descrpition on any other input field – such as "Please enter a valid email address" or the like. So one should look at it as what it is: an explanation/descrpition, of what the user is expected to do with that input field. In my opinion such explanations have more to do with 'corporate language' or 'branding' ...


0

You use that phrase because you are talking to a human and nothing else. If something else needed to read or understand that phrase, it would be done differently. That is the answer to the question.


4

I've user tested a captcha precisely one time, but I'd argue that yes, it does make sense. Many, many people still don't know that bots are capable of submitting data via forms. Therefore, they are also unfamiliar with the concept that bots submitting forms is undesirable. And they are thirdly unfamiliar that tests for sentience exist and are necessary. ...


0

Actually a nice point to talk about. With the trends in development using a few image processing techniques, a bot can also be in a position to crack the captcha but will have troubles if the space between the letters is very less or when overlapped. This is how you distinguish between humans and bots(basically programs) with captcha which is required at ...


2

My guess would be that it's a more "positive" prompt than something more antagonistic like "verify you're not a spammer". The latter is accusatory, but the former is- as you point out- obviously true.


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At face-value there is a trade-off between usability and security. The argument could be made that requiring an exact case match would make it less likely that the CAPTCHA could be brute forced or guessed by machine vision. However in real world cases (brute force protection, machine vision mitigation graphics) the actual risk introduced by being case ...


4

For starters, I strongly recommend against using captchas as they are not user friendly and have significant usability issues and make it harder for users to complete the form. To quote this article Firstly, it is worth pointing out that captchas are nowhere near as secure as you’d like to believe. Back in 2005, the W3C pointed out that third party ...


0

It depends on the technology a website is using. Usually, recaptcha the follows the following sequence for spam reduction. It offers a known captcha and another unknown word that it wants to identify (from some book), so even if the give on lower case or a completely upper case text, the other one can be unknowingly a text, number or a mix of both. So, ...



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