Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

82

With regards to your question of whether a bot can actually go and submit a form automatically, this is what I found on an answer on Stack Overflow. It is comparatively harder to automate data submission within native apps. This is due to the fact that you cannot just write an automated script to discover elements within the source code and then ...


63

Why would this be indecipherable to a computer? Since each word has the correct letters, but they are scrambled, it would seem very easy for me for a computer to crack the correct order of the letters by comparing it to known words. Which defeats the whole point of having this extra barrier. Secondly, how would this affect folks with dyslexia or other ...


62

Ironically, I could not get by myself what bgeigr meant, but almighty Google helped me out: So this captcha is quite easy for computers to guess, yet may be hard for humans. And bear in mind that Google is using an error model for common typos (letters replaced by those adjacent on the keyboard etc.) If you program your computer to only consider ...


40

CAPTCHA is an example of forcing a customer to deal with a business/technical problem - an exchange of great effort for little return on their behalf. "Are you human?" often accompanies these all too common patterns. You can do better than CAPTCHA by not questioning your customers' humanity, and instead build honey-pots to catch the bots. Honey-pots are ...


35

tl;dr A good captcha would need (ideally) to offer the best possible protection (difficult to get for a computer) and ease of use (easy to get for a human). But captchas aren't good at this and "typoCaptchas" doesn't seem to improve them. Questions can be rearrenged quite easily and then if the question is easy enough for people is probably easy enough for ...


32

This is not effective for keeping out a targeted attack by someone who uses a word list, such as /usr/share/dict/words, to solve your anagrams. A task like "unscramble the words in standard input, assuming the first and last letters are correct, given a word list file for the language" is probably so straightforward that it'd make a good puzzle for our Code ...


25

Snapchat recently added image recognition: (http://venturebeat.com/2014/01/22/snapchat-find-the-ghost/) Note: As most captchas, this is also breakable. But until your app becomes a popular target, this is a pretty nice alternative ;-)


19

The symbol you mention is actually the international symbol of access. It's been around since the late sixties, and it is used to indicate that access has been improved, particularly for wheelchair users, but also for other disability users. Take a gander here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Symbol_of_Access If you start using different signs ...


18

I'm wondering if we can exploit some of the physical properties that differ between real people using browsers and spambots. The two properties that come to mind for me are sequence and pace. Sequence: A real person will download a page before submitting a comment; some spambots jump straight to sending a form submission. Can we detect whether we've ...


18

I couldn't believe that I could Macaulay uesdnatnrd what I was radioing: the phenomenal power of the human mind. According to a research team at Cambridge Nerviness, it doesn’t matter in what order the letters in a word are, the only iprmoatnt thing is that the first and slat letter be in the right pilau. The rest can be a tootle mess and you can still ...


16

Rather than asking the user to answer a question or choose a correct picture or enter something, another option is to simply delete something from a regular text field. From an implementation perspective at least, it could not be easier!


15

NO. When speaking of either registration forms or comment forms, they are merely common attempts at foiling false registrations, and SPAM. I find Captchas annoying and frustrating. There are many other options: Email verification Multiple choice questions Random addition (comments on WebDesignerDepot) Code Via Text Message (Craigslist) Pictures of ...


14

I have found that most web literate users are familiar with the concept of a CAPTCHA, but most are not familiar with the term "CAPTCHA". Even my parents (who are not web savvy) understand the idea of "enter these characters to prove you're a human" -- however, they wouldn't understand the headline. I would recommend something more straightforward: "Please ...


11

You can add a hidden field -- that is hidden to the UI, but not the code. The Spam-bots will fill out that field, while real people will not. It solves the spam problem without annoying real people. See Spamicide for example https://drupal.org/project/spamicide


10

We implemented a solution that measured the amount of time it took to submit. On arrival to the page with the form set a session variable with the time in On hitting the code that actually processes the form, check that the time it took to fill in and submit was not stupidly fast Works really well and is completely accessible. Here's a demo: ...


10

CAPTCHA and email verification serve different purposes, so one does not replace the other. CAPTCHA is a way of trying to make sure that it is a person that is submitting a form and not just a script. There are many alternatives for how you can do this, but that is another question. Email verification is a way of making sure that the email address that ...


10

Is bot traffic from an iPhone (or Android device) actually a problem? The problem is not so much 'from an iPhone', but rather that the API you are talking too needs to be protected. At the underlying IP level there is not much you can do to prove what a remote device is, for HTTP it is really just the headers or form data, which a Bot can generate ...


9

I had never heard of that one, interesting method. However personally, I find it more user-friendly not to require a captcha (or assira) at all unless there are high enough indications that it might be spam, that way most users are not punished for wanting to interact with the website. For more ideas, you could check out Can we do better than CAPTCHA? or ...


9

Yes, Captchas are still annoying. Even Stack Exchange, which has relatively few captchas compared to many other sites, gets a large number of complaints about their captchas. It's becoming more common than when it was introduced (and at the same time maybe less common than it used to be, now that OpenID is becoming more popular) but it's still a significant ...


9

Here's the goal of a CAPTCHA from Wikipedia: These tests are designed to be easy for a computer to generate but difficult for a computer to solve, but again easy for a human. The CAPTCHA you are referencing is easy for us to understand and far easier than the path that static CAPTCHAs have been going down: Imagine the difficulty a person with poor ...


9

I absolutely hate 'text' orientated/based captcha's, they are inconvenient, often too difficult, annoying, time consuming etc etc. There are hundreds of alternatives though that don't make the user have to attempt at getting every letter of a ridiculously difficult captcha correct before being able to complete the what should have been a 2 second task. ...


8

The CAPTCHA is a good idea where any bot online can and would sign up and/or post to your site. Wikipedia says CAPTCHAs are used in attempts to prevent automated software from performing actions which degrade the quality of service of a given system, whether due to abuse or resource expenditure. [...] CAPTCHAs are also used to minimize automated posting to ...


8

The CAPTCHA used on the UX.SE(and most likely other SE sites) is brilliant. It is light hearted and gives a chuckle instead of annoying you. This might not appease everyone, but it sure attempts to make light of an annoying situation. Also while being funny, it gives context to why you are being asked to enter the CAPTCHA text, to prove "I'm a Human Being". ...


8

These "security" devices hurt user experience. Some of the hacking/security "industry" guides suggest manually completing one of these CAPTCHA mechanisms as a person before allowing your interactive program to interface with the target site or application. This means that once you're authenticated as a person most sites assume you will still behave as a ...


8

Please DO NOT use most of the examples in the upvoted answer, they completely exclude people with a wide range of impairments (image recognition is useless if you're blind, metaphorical association is useless if you're autistic, maths questions are useless if you're discalculaic etc etc), and they also do nothing at all to remove the problem of humans ...


8

Would Typocaptcha result in a better or worse user experience when compared to CAPTCHA? It doesn't really matter. CAPTCHAs are a hurdle for humans. Which is the intent...they are meant to be a hurdle...hopefully one a human can jump but not a computer. But regardless, hurdles are a bad user experience so if there's a way to do it without the hurdle, ...


8

No, you should not use CAPTCHA. You should focus on technical ways of solving your problems rather than shifting the technical burden onto your users. As a simple example, you are asking for an email address, so you could validate the email address (which you should do anyway) as a substitute for CAPTCHA. Someone could still write a script to generate ...


7

The typical honeypot CAPTCHA field has a proper label: "If you are a human, do not fill in this field." or some other clear label telling the user what it is. And, as such, a screen reader should read it just fine. If you're looking for true usability and accessibility, however, then realize any sort of CAPTCHA is a detriment. It's putting the burden on ...


7

CAPTCHA is Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart. So, indeed, Asirra is (a type of) CAPTCHA... If you mean the warped text type of it, I think Asirra is not useful because: it requires use of mouse it requires more time than warped text it requires specific interest while trying to fit in a design I think best ...


7

I just read a very interesting article on the matter a few days ago. It has creative alternatives, you should check it out http://webdesignledger.com/tips/why-you-should-stop-using-captchas



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible