Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I don't think the user needs an extra link to help close their browser window, as there's already a standard close button that they know how to use. Instead, suggest that they've completed registration, and tell them that they can close the window. And, even better, have a button to go to what they were trying to do before they registered (like commenting ...


0

Without knowing the context, I would be more inclined to link someone back to login page or homepage after this type of registration. This way, they could have some options if they haven't received an email/spam etc. However, if you're set on your initial approach I would go with something like: Thank you + check email to activate message. Btn - 'Close ...


3

To make it stage one acceptable you may want to follow the conventional ordering of the icons so that the user has one less thing to figure out or take care of before performing any action. I do have a suggestion regarding the use of icons. If possible and feasible, place hyperlink on the defining (column) table cell of the row (like some title or id or ...


1

The order and color is less important than consistency. There are those that argue primary to the left, there are others that argue primary to the right. The bigger concerns, IMHO, are proximity and contrast. When one of the actions is relatively destructive, I would argue that it shouldn't even look like the primary action. If the primary action is a ...


1

One school of thought is to make the most destructive operation the less obvious option. The reasoning follows that the increased cognitive load required to select the destructive option implies that the user is consciously deciding to do so So for example, you could do something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with ...


5

This is very similar to the Should "Yes, delete it" be red, or green? question. Here is my answer to that. With respect to your particular question, Option B is what makes the most sense, as that is where your eye is naturally drawn to. That said, I would like to suggest an Option C: I would switch the order of the buttons so that the ...


1

Fortunately or unfortunately, spammers are good at convincing people to click links in emails. How do they do it? Personalize it - Include the name of the sender (assuming the recipient knows the sender.) Use the recipient's name. This proves it is not a generic email. Spoof your sending address - Make it appear the email came directly from the sender ...


0

You have to look deeper into GitHub's intended audience. GitHub was built by developers for developers, a majority of whom use the repository to store their code for software development projects that they're working on. I would assume a majority of GiHub's user base are of the technical breed, in which case we would consider them "advanced" users. GitHub ...


0

Since GIthub.com is interacted with primarily via Git on the command-line the CTAs are located within the sections that users go to for primary interaction. Coincidentally, these are the only actions not available in git-the-command-line-tool —i.e. they are features specific to GitHub.com: Issues Pull Requests Pages


3

GitHub hosts code repositories that make use of the Git version control system. Traditionally, Git is a command-line driven tool, so most users of github actually "interact" with it using the command-line. The web-based "view" on a repository (from my experience as a user) primarily holds two use cases/advantages: Read some documentation without having to ...


1

It should be a <button> (even if it doesn't look like one) for accessibility reasons. As @the-usability-people stated in their answer, links should only be used for navigation purposes. Revealing and hiding content is not considered navigation. So, unless you would be navigating somewhere, an anchor link (<a>) would not be correct.


1

The example is (Starbucks) isn't all that great: <div id="learnMoreImg" class="learnMoreBtn">&nbsp;</div> It's neither a link nor a button, but a div. And a div sans any real content. So completely in accessible. Seems pretty sloppy of Starbucks (as they tend to be pretty good with their online properties). That said, from a ...


3

I think ideally what you'd want to do in this particular case is have the text of the button change after the user initially clicks it to something like "collapse." You can probably find a more artful label than collapse in this instance but the learn more label is no longer helpful to users after it has been clicked. Hope this helps.


0

I say that in this case, I think it makes more sense as a link. When you click it, more aside-style info is revealed - no real actions on data are applied. It's more of just a navigational feature. I don't think the Learn More is the main CTA of the page. To me the CTA is to click on one of those bags of coffee and make the purchase. With #2 in mind ...


0

Buttons are for actions Links are for navigation Answer: it depends on where the CTA points to



Top 50 recent answers are included