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As a general principle, I always think of error messages as inferior design/ UI, which in most cases can and should be avoided. If the user interaction triggers an error message, why would the UI allow users the option in the first place? Examples: error message "password is not good enough" -> better: live indicator to signal password strength error ...


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The most appropriate way in my opinion should be, disable the reschedule button and an informative message already written next or below the reschedule button telling user that the appointment cannot be rescheduled since the time left in their appointment is less than 24 hours, or whatever the condition applies.


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As per my point of view the notification banner two buttons needs to be changed. It must be like: So, that user do not confuse in refresh buttons.


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Show a notification and eventually an error. Keep your interface consistent and show the link. You can simply disable it and show a notification. It won't be annoying if it's friendly and informative. On the contrary, it would do your users a favor! It doesn't create misleading expectations with a working link or confusion by hiding the link all of a ...


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I don't think you should ever present an error message until the user actually triggers one. Eg I hate when sites trigger a validation error for a required field that I either clicked on or tabbed through but didn't enter an invalid value into yet. Thus in your case I would only show a note/warning/error message if the user tried to pick a datetime that ...


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I would opt to option 2, but without showing the message explicitly. Just disable the link and put information message into its title attribute, so that the user sees it upon hovering the link. In this way only those who did want to cancel an appointment would receive the information. Additionally, you could place ? sign with a similar 'disabled' ...


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You really have two separate questions that should be weighted together in the final decision. 1. Is this effective for capturing new leads? Probably. This pattern (anti-pattern according to some) is frequent around the interwebs. That is not purely the result of copy cat or uninformed marketers getting greedy for email addresses. I've personally tested ...


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The fact that you have never followed a CTA doesn't mean your targeted audience won't. One of the biggest misconceptions in UX design is that people think they know what their audience wants, when in fact they don't. It's a great way to generate leads for their marketing or sales team to follow up with emails, legally you should ask for permission to use ...


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First thing first Nobody is removing CTAs. In any case, some sites are (well, I think they did it some time ago) removing CERTAIN CTAs. In the specific case you mention, the Add to Cart button. As to why are they doing it, it may be many reasons. But answering a part of your question As UX designers, have any of you made this change on your site? What ...


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As a general design question, I think it is not unusual for design trends to change, if only to adjust to the change in user behaviour since the last wave of design trends. So I suppose in general you can look at the 'trend' as being something that is part of a constant change in design ideas, and the other part being driven by specific factors in the ...


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Exposure = Revenue (the business side) The cognitive goods matrix: There are goods you are aware you need. This is your shopping list. There are goods you are unaware you need. This is the stuff you forgot to put on your shopping list. There are goods you are aware you want, but you don't exactly need them. Like a book you have on your wishlist, but you ...



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