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21

I don't think you need two icons. The default action is "buying for myself." "Buying as a gift" is an additional check. Amazon does this and I think it's much simpler and intuitive.


15

Reds, yellows and oranges are spotted swifter by the human eye, and multivariant testing typically confirms that call-to-action buttons get the most clicks when they're orange - and by a significant margin. Reds and yellow both do well; greens often come out poorest. Yellow possibly fares a little worse on the web because humans have a harder time resolving ...


15

Blue is the most common Favorite Color, which has been backed up repeatedly. (source) In addition to being the most popular color, blue just works well. Backgrounds are often white or black, and blue works on both. Blue is a friendly color for most common forms of colorblindness as well, as it doesn't mix in with any other colors in red/green ...


14

I understand your justification for a "Do not click me" button. If curiosity is exactly the emotion you'd like to instill in the users when they see this button, perhaps you could try something along the lines of "Sneak peek" or "We're changing" or "Behold, the future is here". This way, you are not misleading your users. Your intention is also received as ...


10

A few things. The business's objective is to encourage the user to add new feeds. Since the content (of the feeds) will drive their motivation, the best you can do (without research) is to provide the tools for them to do so. I've encountered this situation many times - where the business wants to "hide" or "make it difficult" for the user to perform an ...


10

We are naturally drawn to movement, so shaking any button will cause people to notice it more. That however is not necessarily a good thing. It isn't someone noticing it in a good way. You are very likely to annoy or people who are getting their attention drawn to something that they may not want to be looking at. Think of those annoying banner adds that ...


8

Interestingly... In some research carried out by Doug Schumacher in 2005, he found that having no call to action button increased the click through rate by 27%. The description of the tests describes how it was carried out on two otherwise identical banners with each having nearly 400,000 impressions. But wait - it's not that clear cut! Unfortunately ...


8

Given that you mentioned yourself that the user has already initiated the action, it is likely that the user will want to confirm the action. Cancel is not really an action, but rather a dismissal of the modal dialog. Given that, I suggest you strongly de-emphasize the cancel button. If you do, it becomes clear that you do not need the color coding in the ...


7

Twitter originally started with the "what are you doing?" moniker attached to its input form to inspire users to post something. Then once Twitter became infamous for people literally posting what they were doing, the copy was changed to "what's going on?", reflecting Twitter's intent to be a platform for up-to-the-minute news and goings-on. So copy in this ...


7

The simple answer is "Provide your users value." If there is value worthy of a user downloading your app, they will do it. Firefox is a tough example as nearly every smart phone already has a web browser. Convincing people that there is added value in installing Firefox on their phone is a tough sales pitch. To answer your bullet points: Detection - if ...


7

To answer the last part of your question first: how uploading an image works on different devices depends largely on the support for and implementation of HTML5 features such as the File API and file form input fields. On iOS, for example, a prompt appears asking whether the user wants to take a picture with the camera or upload an existing file (see this ...


7

The weightage of your call to actions should be defined by your end user goals and which call to action you want your users to click. Hence the call to action which you think is more important for your business should be stronger as opposed to the secondary call to action. So in your case if you feel getting users to sign up for a free trial is more ...


7

This is very similar to the Should "Yes, delete it" be red, or green? question. Here is my answer to that. With respect to your particular question, Option B is what makes the most sense, as that is where your eye is naturally drawn to. That said, I would like to suggest an Option C: I would switch the order of the buttons so that the ...


6

Both "register" and "Sign up" are bland and should be avoided in an actual call to action. Sign up is generally not preferred as it can be confused with "sign in". Note that "register" is still fine for a secondary command like when you're at a login screen and you don't have a login; register is the obvious thing to look for, so don't break those ...


6

I would try something like the image below. It allows you to keep a similar layout, while making it very clear that there is a step required to enable text notifications.


6

"Resend order confirmation" seems the clearest from your description. You have already sent it, so 'request' wouldn't be a good choice as it implies that it has not been sent before. 'Send me another' is clear but too long as it has the same meaning as 'resend'. Additionally, you don't have to specify 'email' unless there are multiple communication ...


6

Having a clear feedback button has shown to increase the amount of feedback that you get. Whether this is a good thing or not depends on your business model. Additionally a floating feedback button on the side of a site has become common place now, so most users won't have a problem with it. Which side it is on depends partly on design issues, and I've ...


6

A placeholder is an efficient tool for teaching what your user is going to do next without spoon-feeding him. The key of success here is to give an answer to the question: What am I gonna to do next, how and why? As this could be a lot of information, it's okay to split the answer on multiple dialogs. An example: If you want to get the user's profile image, ...


6

Applications all over the place tend to rely on a color scheme that has already, to a certain extent, become a standard. Red means: Oh no! Careful! Beware! ATTENTION!!! Green means: Safe. Go for it. Ah yes, nothing to worry about. I don't think it slows a user down, quite the contrary actually. Since universally applications have adopted red and green to ...


5

I think "Free" could improve conversion in some cases but there might be some cultural issues you should take into account. In a project I was involved we added the word Free to our signup button, that was the only change we did. After analyzing the impact we discovered quite positive results in our American and British sites but negative consequences in ...


5

The best color will depend on your site colors. You need the button to be visible, therefore a contrasting color might be a good choice. I would suggest that you pick some colors, and perform a simple a/b testing on the site.


5

Good question! I'm dealing with this issue myself with submit, cancel, and exit buttons on a page. Here is The Visual Weight of Primary and Secondary Action Buttons for the visual weight of primary and secondary buttons. Here is Primary & Secondary Actions with a longer list at the bottom. Here is Working with Visual Weight in Your Designs that ...


5

Chrome does this pretty well; it quietly shows a little up arrow icon over the "menu" icon (oddly I couldn't find an image of this). When you click the "update" icon it lets you know you should restart Chrome to let it update. If you naturally close Chrome at any point it will (very quietly and quickly) update. Since updates generally aren't so important ...


5

I am actually going to attempt, after this intro., to avoid the concept of the fold entirely as it's an interesting debate - especially with mobile screen sizes being so short, laptops being short, and, generally, not being able to guarantee/know where the fold is. (This happens a lot at my current job. The designers and I all use 27" iMacs - then the ...


5

Although the question does ask specifically about the colour I would like to make the following suggestion: With a critical function such as the one you describe you want to make the function interaction steps different from other interaction steps associated with less destructive actions to avoid a user following a repetitive, almost sub-conscious pattern ...


4

Steam, a digital download games shop, shows both options on the cart view. The options are "Purchase for myself" and "Purchase as a gift" as buttons. I prefer this over checkboxes in this case as it has a deeper meaning in Steam as you can choose the recipients user account so the game gets added to them directly. When it comes to a "me" icon not even ...


4

Well, I partially understand your question, but you may look at the Gmail way of addressing Actions. They have a drop down ACTION link (treat it as a link) which for ex. "Reply" and will have set of related ACTION commands underneath it. It means that it has hidden the ACTION but also made people understand that there is more left underneath the "Reply" - ...


4

The button alone should define the call to action (specifying what the button will do / where it will take you). It should not depend on external text to explain what the action is. You can however have additional text around it to give the user reasons why they specifically might want to do that action.


3

This may or may not be considered "keeping the same layout" but what came to mind immediately was this: add checkboxes for SMS notifications next to each relevant entry. The space is already there. What you have here makes it seem as if once you enable SMS notifications, you will get those notifications for all of the listed reasons. If that's not how the ...


3

Whether it can, depends on how the site is programmed. Whether it should -- yes, for me it looks like a nice usability feature. Only keep in mind that "Call now, we are open for x more hours" requires the user to do mental math to find until when s/he can call. Better detect the user's time zone and do the math, so you can say "You can call now or any time ...



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