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21

Because the simple system works. You set it when you go to bed, and if you don't want to be woken up the next day, just don't set it. More complicated ones with more features are available if you like, but the common ones do the job in the simplest most intuitive way. Good UX design.


19

Some of the standard cues: Hover state: Make the calendar icon transform when the user hovers it, maybe having the calendar show a grid representing a month on hover. Contextual text: Write Show month or similar as a link adjacent to the calendar. Mimic button: Add borders to the icon which makes it appear as a button.


18

I would say it should get progressively louder. There have been very few times when I have set an alarm with no purpose. However, there have been many times when I have hit the snooze button when I shouldn't have due to poor decision making skills in a semi-sleep state. Trust the alert person setting the alarm, not the half-conscious person trying to ignore ...


18

Neither approach is ideal. You almost need a combination of the two. If I select that I want something to happen every single month, just because it's on the 31st doesn't mean that I don't want it to reoccur. I would stop trusting my calendar forever if even once it failed to notify me. Better to assume people want it reoccurring than to just be OCD. Those ...


17

With the google calendar on android, you can scroll down from one month to the next and view a whole month - but here's the key: - it's seamlessly attached top and bottom to the previous and next month without having to think about overlapping parts of the week, or having gaps, or having repeated parts of the week, or greying out days that do not belong to ...


14

Yes, it matters (especially in parts of the world where week numbers are important). There are three main calendar formats defining the starting day of the week; Monday (used by most of Europe and the rest of the world that adheres to ISO-8601), Saturday (used by much of the Middle East), and Sunday (used in North America and Israel): Image from Wikipedia ...


12

The way outlook handles it is closer to what I would imagine a persons intentions would be when scheduling an appointment. However Outlook doesn't give you the option to handle it differently, which is a mistake. You should be given the choice which way you would like it handled when you schedule an appointment for a day that each month doesn't have ...


10

Try doing a google search on calendar icon and then you capture the results (if worth it). Just by skimming the results I saw that 9 was a popular number, but not far from others. From the Semiotics perspective 31 might work, as people easily identify it as the maximum number of days a month can get, and design-wise is filling. I think that only having the ...


10

You're not showing the whole context so we can't see how the icon you show fits in to the context of the page. However, it will help if you make the 'thing' a self contained actionable item - most usually in the form of a button (whatever style suits your theme) and also add a call to action (eg show calendar) or a label (Calendar). For more information ...


8

I would show a calendar picker with non-selectable days grayed out. When the user hovers over the non-selectable day, I would display a tool tip explaining why that date isn't selectable. For instance, here's an example of blackout dates from MSDN: (Sidenote: Are you sure there's a reason for having the user select their shipping date? In most ...


8

If I write myself a note and put it somewhere, it acts as a constant low level reminder. I can walk past it numerous times and I can ignore it or act upon it. If I don't wish to act on it the next time I see it, it's presence is not enough to annoy me. If I set a reminder on my mobile, I usually have to pick a specific time. If it's an appointment or ...


7

If I were to design an alarm clock, I would make it neither louder nor softer. Instead, I would go for shorter and shorter snooze periods, until it refuses to snooze anymore. I can't really see a case for a softer alarm, including the one that you described. As for louder, there are many situations were louder will wake up others, e.g. a roommate or ...


7

The Right Information Firstly, make sure your displays show the information the user needs to make good decisions and input. The use of a color-coded matrix assumes that your user is trying to achieve a certain pattern of assignments, such as a certain number of people in each duty type per day (e.g., have adequate coverage when some are on vacation), or ...


7

You should definitely allow the user to make this choice independent of their locale settings. Many people will want their planner calendar to match up to other calendar software in which they may have made custom settings, or to match features of their work schedule or lifestyle that might not be represented in the standard for their locale.


7

I like both ideas, although I'm leaning more towards the second design because it better illustrates the idea of fullness (of schedule) which is what you're trying to convey. In the first design, the days with more tasks are more prominent than the ones with less tasks, which is the opposite of what the user is going to be looking for (less busy days). If ...


6

With desktops, The question you need to answer here is the effective use of real estate or screen space. Though most computers have pretty high resolutions now,providing a full sized calender does take up a lot of space and might not be effective in terms of best use of the available screen space. However if your calender is a critical part of your design ...


6

I've seen it both ways. One argument in support of swiping/scrolling vertically between months is that, because of the way dates are listed in columns according to the day of the week (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday etc.), being able to simply follow that column down from month to month is slightly less disorientating that scrolling horizontally and then finding ...


6

Another option to consider is adjusting some of the visual elements to reinforce the "I'm clickable" nature of the graphic. I would suggest making the "Today" label the same color as the primary link color you are using on the site (or perhaps use that color in the background gradient). The current white on gray gradient has contrast and readability problems ...


5

This spiral plot example is used for historical data, but the general idea might be adaptable..?


5

I work at an online scheduling software company (I hope you don't :) so I hope my answer is worth it's salt. For simultaneous events, you need to separate each location into as many slots as the location can handle. A design like location one would be ideal but it gets tricky fast when events don't start or end on the same time. Engineering will quickly ...


5

Yes, it matters, but which day you choose as the first day of the week depends on the use of the calendar. If you work at a large company, there may be standards that you should follow. Most "general use" calendars start the day of the week on Sunday However, there are many specific applications that wouldn't make sense with Sunday being the first day of ...


5

The international standard defined in ISO 8601 is that a week begins on Monday. That means that you don't set someones week starting with Sunday based on language configurations. Monday is always the correct default. If you want to give the user the choice to use a nonstandard calendar that starts with Sunday, the user should make that choice himself.


5

You're trying to relay the "fullness" of a day but neither visualization provides that information at a glance. The heatmap needs a key, and the horizontal bar feels more like a progress indicator. A pie, while widely panned, is a common indicator of "fullness". Here's a quick mockup to give some flavor. It works great with your defined rule of 0 to 4 ...


4

It makes sense to show the dates as a calendar, as it can be fairly self-explanatory means of indicating weekends and holidays up front, without too much extra messaging. I've shown an example from an online grocery site in the UK called Ocado. When picking dates there's a help icon above the calendar pops open a legend to explain the shading on dates. This ...


4

While I agree that the simple design does work, there is a place, I think, for more advances in the development of alarm clocks, as long as the complexity of setting them is not hugely increased. I have a Digital Radio alarm clock, and I woudl really like to be able to set different stations for waking me up in the morning and other times - like at night to ...


4

My alarm clock does this, and it's brillant! I don't buy the "because simple is best" argument in this case, for the reason that the alarm clock I own is simple to use, never wakes me up at the weekend and I never forget to set it on weekdays either—it's already done it for me. A great enhancement. I can't believe more alarm clocks don't have this feature. ...


4

My guess is that there are many reasons: people are traditional. we're still analog creatures. paper has a friendly UI, is high resolution, easy to manipulate. paper is conspicuous. For me, personally, for little to-dos, it's just quicker for me to write it down on paper than it is to turn on my phone, open an app, go to the proper place, open the mini ...


4

I'm currently working on a project for an interactive design class where I'll be redesigning a calendar. As part of that, I've been informally interviewing almost everyone I encounter about whether they use paper vs. phone / laptop / etc. and their likes and dislikes. A surprising number of people who are otherwise very technically inclined have said that ...


4

Hmmm. If I understand your question, you want the solution to be as flexible as possible as well - to be able to select multiple consecutive days as easily as a few hours (or even minutes). In broad terms, I'm thinking: Zoom and pan to get the broad timeframe (e.g. zoom out to get years, pan across to select 2015, zoom in to select the first week in ...



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