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0

From the above answer I would use either this with the car icon or my suggestion.t should be positioned on the black background so it is easily spottable. Also, use "+" icon


1

The best example I can think of is Youtube. Though it's not video, but can work really well in the case of image gallery as well. The bottom bar can be used to show the current position in the gallery and allow users to click on either image or the button at bottom right corner to enlarge the image and enter the full-screen gallery view mode.


0

Your case reminds me CNN's app, and here's the suggestion: As soon as the users enters the screen an icon of a camera (with the number of pictures on the gallery) appears. This icon vanishes after a few seconds thus leaving the image clear. If the user taps on the image, the user will be send to the gallery (last image on the right). On the gallery you ...


-1

Cancel button always need to be left align to OK button with some 20px in distance to each other like Because user mostly prefer more right align (side) to click.


-1

As a user experience, button should be eye catcher and it should be highlighting color,it should be align right side, because user is more preference the right alignment.


0

I would get straight to the point and just show the two options. Since you have some space to spare, I would also add a quick description of each option. This helps new users find what they are looking for and returning users quickly recall the difference between the two options. Quick mockup:


0

The cut out of a radio is a standard size. Slightly wider than a finger is about 6 buttons. In the old day the manual button really moved a dial.


0

I believe the play/pause symbol (Arrow with Vertical line amalgamated to the right vertex of the triangle) is also the symbol of a diode in a semi-conductor device used in electronics. If you research how a diode works then i think you would be pleasantly satisfied about the design of the play/pause symbol.


1

It's a little strange to have that button there with all that space wasted in the most important area of the screen (close to the fingers); Having only one button will always make the user go for 2 clicks (3 clicks with the selection of a playlist) for any action and in time one of the 2 actions will get the most usage (track that) and will become ...


1

Next to the "Add/+" button, you can have /(downarrow) selector which could either accordian-open a drop-down menu or pop-open a modal box which would allow setting indivual on-the-fly user-action preferences. (Add/Delete Behavior Settings) Similar to how myfonts.com handles the behavior selections for viewing overview samples.: The Behavior Settings ...


0

I think it's better for the user to know why he can not do any action. So just don't hide or disable the Button, but show him why he can't push it. Like un forms, you can't submit if required fields are stille empty.


1

Usually there is one question that I ask while designing such an interface. Does any user action change the state of the control that is currently disabled? If any user actions toggles the state of the control then it makes sense to have those controls visible but in disabled state. If the control will never be enabled then it makes sense to show it as a ...


1

It's always challenging to do navigation for mobile. I go through this little cheat sheet to freshen up for the menu navigation possibilities. Regarding your problem, the solution you've reached sounds good. But, it's one thing to describe it and an entirely different thing to see it. It makes sense as you describe it, but that's different from making ...


1

Even if there was no usability relevance in it, the external on/off WiFi button falls in the realm of psychological comfort and still contributes to improving the user experience. No matter how abstract technology gets, people will always be tactile beings. We need to touch and feel the surroundings, so that they become real in our mind. Especially with ...


1

I personally understand the logic of this double-button and I think I would get the idea, but it all depends on the perception of every user. I see this solution as a purposeful ambiguity, which is meant to simplify the design. If it's bound to lead to confusion or not, I can't say, unless I take a look on the overall design of that page. I see two options: ...


1

You could save clicks and effort by simply removing the radio buttons. Why don't you simply let the user click on the buttons on the right (e.g. "Cliente") to open a modal? Once that is filled out you can display a little checkmark image right of the button. To indicate the opening of a modal on button click you should consider changing the text to "...


2

Apple does this in several places. Perhaps they're focused on making actions easily reversible everywhere. It doesn't seem like language selection is an exception.


1

Generally speaking Apple is the opposite of Windows. The reasons for this go back a long way, and it's Windows that didn't think about it, they simply wanted to do it the opposite to the Mac. I say this because it's useful to understand that some initial thought went into the order of affirming an action, or escaping from it. Apple's designers decided we ...


3

Presumably it is emphasised as - if the entire interface is converted to French and you can't read any French - then it is impossible to reverse the action !


1

This notification shows accesses that will be granted. It is security important. So I think negative action is highlighted to ensure that user makes his choise after looking at permissions. And maybe other reason is that it also could be pressed by keyboard, accidentally, with Enter key. In this case nothing wrong will happen, app with dangerous ...


4

There is No particularly accepted icon for users current location. It's moreover depends on which map/technology user uses. I agree with @Andrew Martin, as he showed those three icons for iOS, Bing and Google. My Suggestion: 1. Considering you can target your audience Since it's hard to tell which is more Universal or easily recognized by users in that ...


8

Short answer: No. Long answer: There are a few different ones out there (I only bothered to check 3) and some of them offer more functionality than "find me"; for example iOS also uses that button to switch rotation lock modes, Google also uses it to switch rotation lock as well as tilt angle. - It could be argued that these are different buttons and ...


0

Save ensures that the data you've entered is saved. If you do not tap on Save, your new data won't be saved. The original will remain. Done exits the edit screen to ensure that the Settings you've entered are right, but doesn't "save" anything for the future. It might be possible that you will have to reenter the details for another transaction. Bowen Li ...


0

You should have a button. Can you have a shorter input box and then place the button? You can design a button not so heavy visually and keep the minimal style to the rest of the website. do not sacrifice your UX over a minimalist look.


0

Yes. Even if it's never clicked, the button is still useful. The presence of a button visually indicates that nothing will happen until you tell it to. If I saw a search bar with no search button, I would assume it would perform searches as I type. My first thought when I start typing would be "why isn't it searching yet?" Edit: Challenging what I just ...


0

Great answers here. What no one has mentioned is Fitt's Law which governs the speed (and ease) of clicking targets in a GUI. It gives some hard science to where to place primary buttons. Basically Fitts Law (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fitts%27s_law) states that the size of the target and distance act predictably on the time it takes to hit the target. ...


0

Based on my personal experience A/B testing and the results of numerous eye-tracking studies, I recommend that the button (which I assume counts as the "conversion") be inline with the movement of the reader's eye. That means the full-width button is always inline (but can get silly when too wide). The smaller button on the wider viewport is beneath the ...


1

I would recommend the reverse of what you described. Instead of having a button that allows you to scroll, show a static map, as Brett East described, with a caption/button of something like "Press to Open". In order to control the map, the user can press (or long-press) on the static map, which links to a new view with full-screen zoomable/draggable map ...



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