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A similar habit can also be observed in Lifts where people press the CLOSE door button multiple times. The reason is very simple. Since the users don't get any feedback from the system about their action, they tend to ensure that they did it right. In the case of Lifts, they keep on pressing the CLOSE door button until it starts to close. The similar ...


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Your answer lies in the answer of the following question: Why does a guitarist moves his fingers as if plucking imaginary strings when his favorite tune plays in the background? Why can't you simultaneously draw a clockwise circle with your foot and a counterclockwise circle with your same-sided hand? reference The reason to all these lies in the sub ...


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For most of my computational life, I have used a graphing calculator. The significance of that is that I can see where I am and, when entering another calculation, I can consciously decide if I want to keep going or start a new calculation. (By including the Ans variable, usually some 2nd^Enter click.) When I use a regular calculator, I usually just use it ...


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In my opinion, right side above of the table would be a better place, it looks good if it display in same size of the button and font size which is used for - Shift 1 button


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How about a single toggle between EDIT and DONE ? http://codepen.io/run-time/pen/yyJMKQ Hopefully you will be able to inform the user when changing their data soon. For future reference, I like how Google doesn't make the user explicitly commit changes and instead offers an easy way to go back...


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The Volume up and volume down buttons should be next to each other, for the simple reason that when users adjust volume they press these buttons alternately and blindly until the desire volume is set, so you don't want any other bottom to be literally in the middle of that interaction. For me this is a must. About the mute icon, I would personally go with ...


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On the bottom, and just a speaker. Photo of the Macbook keyboard fragment UPD: I've submitted my answer and then noticed you've edited the question and added pretty much same photo.


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Consistency is one goal, but it isn't the only goal. It may not be the most important one in this context. (See also: 'Foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.') The relevant UX principle is: things that look the same should work the same; things that work differently should look different. "OK" is consistent, but it may produce different ...


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Mute button at the bottom as this is going to be used less than your standard volume controls, and should also follow a logical flow: Volume up -> Volume down -> Mute. If this is in the middle a user could accidentally press mute which would be annoying. A mute button should follow conventional design so a speaker crossed out would be fine. Check out the ...


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There is a research that shows that designers are over-concerned with consistency. While consistency means that users don't have to relearn things (by that increasing usability), consistency for the sake of it isn't exactly what UX is about - weighing all variables involved. Consistency is not everything. In the case of buttons, the consistency argument ...


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Her argument isn't necessarily bad, if your modals are properly displaying a name/function the ok/cancel combo will just fine for a cta compared to named buttons. Instead of trying to find studies to win an argument try and ask your product manager why she thinks to use ok and cancel. Providing a consistent functionality throughout a system is also ...


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I think there are three big rules that must be taken in to account when identifying the best view/edit paradigm: I want the information to be easy to read (Summary/Print view without edit clutter) I want to prevent unwanted mistakes on important data I want to quickly and easily edit the information The UX solution for View/Edit may be different ...


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I've found that a lot of power users tend not to use the standard central restore button- perhaps the risk of accidentally hitting X is too great- and they instead like to make their windows bigger and smaller by double clicking on the windows bar- most usually in that top right corner due to there often being a myriad of options towards the left. For these ...


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The only application I know which puts an additional button there is Display Fusion (a software to improve the experience with multi-monitor setups). That extra button moves the window to the other monitor: In this case I would say this is appropriate since the associated action controls the window in a similar manner as the other buttons and I'm using ...


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If controls float with users' scrolling, it can be irritating, specifically in the case of image-heavy services that tend to overload their users with visual content. I prefer sharing buttons to appear on hover, they tend to steal too much attention from the content and should be an opt-in. Hovering an image (video component etc) when you need to operate ...


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I am really bad person to answer this as I hate both social media and "listicles", but the benefit of "pop up" is simple enough. They save space. Basically, if your site has lots of separate items you want people to share separately, it becomes desirable for every item to have separate sharing option without more than one being visible at a time. So if you ...


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I would say that putting an extra button there is generally a bad idea for the reasons you stated; you expect there to be just three buttons, and you accidentally click the "switch user" button a lot. Now, here's why it is a bad idea: The Icon for switch user is fairly similar to the minimize Icon Switching users is probably used far less than ...


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Decided to make UI much simpler and obvious, saved a lot of space in the process! :)


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1) 'Archive' actually will be misleading unless record retrieval is provided. 2) 'Hide' is also not appropriate, since 'Show' is the opposite of Hide and user may think that there is an opposite action somewhere else. Hence either go with 'Dismiss' and 'Delete' or, I will feel more appropriate word is 'Ignore' and 'Delete'. By clicking 'Ignore' user ...


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Archive hints that it can be recovered. Google uses this term in Gmail and I can’t imagine they got that wrong. If items can’t be recovered, than there is no use in leaving this choice to the user. But if it is not about archiving items but about reviewing them later, than provide options and labels that are part of that flow. Also use just delete and no ...


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I would go with the first option Dismiss and Delete Delete - as we all know is to remove the record permanently. Hide - gives a sense of ambiguity as whether the record will be hidden currently from my screen or will it be hidden permanently or will there be a "Show" button to see the hidden files. Archive - The general understanding is to store a ...


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Delete is widely used in most systems as a permanent delete action. Between hide and archive, I would use them depending on what kind of records the system is creating. Dismiss I would use for item such and notes and notifications. if the records are permanent items in a database, I would use archive. With dismiss, I would sometime assume that the record ...


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It's better to create stepwise progress bar with first step at 25% and second at 50% and so on. It will look better that way.


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On perceived speed/performance: There was a study showing that "a backward moving ribbon increases the perceived speed of a progress bar". You could apply that effect to any of your options, though the research was about a horizontal bar specifically. I also second @DaveAlger's assertion about not starting at empty. On distraction/awesomeness: I often find ...


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Regarding "Perceived Speed" - research shows that you should never start a progress bar at zero regardless of how long a process will take to complete. Edit: this research is actually talking about a different use case, however, I noticed that Apple always starts their generic progress bar with a little bit filled in so I'd say it applies in this case as ...


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First off, you have a mix of determinate and indeterminate progress indicators. All your examples, but #3, are determinate and show that your system can quantify how much progress has been made towards a known total. #3 is indeterminate, meaning something is happening but your system doesn't know how close it is to completed. My suggestions? Number #3 or ...


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"Sign me up" and other copy written "from users standpoint" sounds overly enthusiastic to me. A bit like "shut up and take my money" kind of thing. Users might not feel all that crazy about the conversion (in fact they might be in the process of exploring all the pros and cons). They might not know if the sign up will benefit them yet. So if you put it ...


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The WYLTIWLT Method - Avoid the Complication of the "Who" Other answers suggest that you should be consistent with the tone of they rest of your site, but your problem isn't about tone, it's about grammar. If you decide to use the "Sign me up" verison, referring to the "who" of the interaction, and try to be consistent with that everywhere in your site, ...


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I do agree on 'beauty is subjective', but still I think what the question's autor means with 'beauty' has more to do with 'user experience' than with 'decoration'. Anyways – just spontaniously to me the most user friendy solution would be a combination of 1) and 4) while leaving the wording ("SUBMIT") out. This is or course just a personal view – but ...


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To avoid ambiguity I would go for something like this: The benefits of doing this is that the user is given a clear message that something is going on and more importantly that they should not leave the current page until it has finished. Maybe even give a lighter green for the "not yet completed" portion of the bar.


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Well, I can't comment on the perceived speed/performance part because you can make it as fast and smooth by just playing with the animation. Beauty is subjective, so I can't really comment on that. The only thing I can note is this, the distraction levels are quite high when the button suddenly turns into a circular loader. This issue can be resolved by ...


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Well, if you have a limited set of options, you could opt for something like Google's action button in the new Inbox app. The user would have to press one button (the icon representing 'doing something'). Pressing the icon will give you the options: having lunch in a meeting teaching preparing a lecture ...in the form of icons (optionally with ...


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First of all This is in fact a switch. In essence, the user will choose from on of two positions, changing to alter behavior of some other element - a switch. In this case, the swtich has two "labels", manifested as icons. One of the positions will be in color (selected or unselected, is OP's question), and the other will be in grey. Grey color in UI ...


3

Version 2 looks to me more like a grid selection to me. But I am not your user (most of the UX community here probably is not either). I am also well aware of select/deselect and grid/list views because I design this sort of thing all the time. Your users may not. So let's dig deeper... Don't mix metaphors Showing something is selected with an active ...


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This will probably make more sense when you see it with the rest of your site, but right now the gray makes me think it's disabled. Below makes more sense to me. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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For some reason I can't add the followings as comment due to my low reputation :( Anyway; I always tend to keep the darker tones of same colour for its active state, same for hover; however it may vary from one design to another due to its overall colour scheme... The light grey/silverish colour of that icons only states that an icon exists, obliviously ...


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Easiest solution would be to add an underline to inactive links/buttons. If you separate tabs with literally one pixel of white space, they will also look more like clickable tabs. I also noticed that you didn't respect visual hierarchy, and your CTA got lost and the component thus doesn't look whole (which contributes to tabs not looking like tabs).


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Why not both? Consider these two scenarios: User has decided to add a few new players. They then want to generate a new team with those players in the roster. They don't care so much about the existing teams, because they were generated before the new changes. User is looking for a specific team. They want to know if it exists. They go through the list, ...


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The question is actually simpler: Does the player list require interaction from the user (i.e selecting players) or are the big lists just for display purposes? Button placement depends on the users flow. In the case of a typical form for example, the flow is this: input required data > button indicates the action to take when complete Does the user have ...


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The Nintendo 3DS has a Wifi switch on the side that slides up to activate/deactivate. As soon as it is released, it springs back to the original position. (In the 3DS's case, it's rather confusing, because WiFi on/off are clear states, and that state is preserved even after powering off) Having a switch that mechanically resets itself to the original ...


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It depends on the image. You don't just want a boring button with text, but at the same time, you don't want an ugly image. Try to stick to images for things such as add, save, close, etc. But keep it modern and 'nice' looking, making it very simplistic.


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If the overall design can support black, then go for black! But, just keep in mind that you have to provide the appropriate visual contrast to support it; especially by the use of whitespace, size contrast and overall visual flow. A pretty nice example of using black on Call To Action, can be found on squarespace's landing page, image below (also get a ...


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Black is definitely not what you want here. Contrasting the primary CTA element with other UI elements is essential for task completion. The key tools for creating visual distinction are: position, shape & size, color, motion, and message. This article elaborates on how to use color effectively in CTA buttons. I'll assume that the primary CTA in this ...


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I'm going to go the other way and say: Hide buttons that are unneccesary. Keep the visual bloat as minimum as possible. To me, a disabled button means that I need to select an option to enable it. An example of this is to check the "I read and accept the EULA" checkbox, which must often be checked before the Next button becomes available. Another example is ...


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No, they should not be hidden, and not only because of consistency, although that is important, but also because if you hide them, you will hide what system can do from user. User should know Saving is generally available, even though it is disabled at the moment (therefore there are some conditions user must comply with to enable this functionality). ...


1

Based on the brief, initial details you've shared here, I recommend definitely not hiding those buttons, even if they're not immediately relevant to the user in whatever view from the wizard you're considering. Whenever we can provide users with contextual, visual queues that do not distract from the overall goal action, but actually enhance it, we should. ...


0

I would put it just right of the "Total" indicator (or perhaps just right of the "Back" and "Next" links that will appear there). Same height and rounded corners as Search box, dark background color complementary to the table header. On narrow screens, search box could appear below the row with Total info and the Add button, but no reason to waste precious ...


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As a user I would prefer the Next button to change to Save on the last screen. Short of that, I would prefer disabled Save with a tooltip explaining why it's disabled. Although, it is possible to have < Back and Next > buttons on a separate row, so they don't move when a new button suddenly appears in the next dialog..


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The question I would ask him is What are the particular downsides to designing it the way I suggested The changing of back and next buttons is never really a good thing in a series of steps. The key word is consistency. Definr defines consistency as: Logical coherence and accordance. A harmonious uniformity or agreement among things or parts. You ...


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If I was the user, I would prefer your solution. Consistency in this context means that the same buttons should be on the same place. Having "the primary" button highlighted is consistent as well - deciding the meaning of "the primary" is an important decision for the whole team though, I would say that "Next" is the primary button for a wizard, which would ...



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