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0

I think you're confusing things. What the X means (in Facebook as in almost any site or app) is to CLOSE a window, not to delete. Delete actions are important and shouldn't be placed in a spot where the user can accidentally click it, much less if they click it on purpose thinking they will actually CLOSE a window. I think you should clarify what do you ...


5

Top right Most users will perceive the image and related text as a whole, then process it starting at the top left then moving downwards and across if necessary. For image+text (English/left-to-right languages) combinations, the visual flow looks like this from eye-tracking studies: Here's what that flow looks like for a Facebook image+text feed: ...


2

First of all I would suggest you to ask yourself "Do I want my user to delete a photo that easily?" Actions that cause some sort of loss should not be made that easy to reach. They should be intuitive but not easy. Deleting a photo is one of them. Also I would want my user to keep photos for as long as possible to build a sound profile. Maybe someone at ...


1

Top right. Since most people are right handed (roughly up to 90 percent of people are right-handed) and using Fitts's law formulas it is the best option. Scott http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handedness http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fitts%27s_law


1

An alternative concept you could test: make it a two-step-process. Tapping on a line both plays the sound and activates the line (e.g. check mark at the left), and on the bottom you'll have a button saying "Send sound to Kyle". In this way, you account for the fact that the user probably will send the sound that he last previewed, and the send-action is ...


1

I think with any naming conventions, consistency, familiarity and logic are your best friends. The problem with the word "Generate" is not much the term, but the lack of context around it. "Generate New Report" makes more sense than "Generate" or "New". But keep in mind that once users know what "Generate" means, they probably don't need to be reminded that ...


1

The position of the button depends on the use case and whether or not your toolbar is a global bar or specific to the current view of the app. The left side of the toolbar is typically reserved for actions associated with the current view of the app. In the use case you provided the toolbar is custom to this view of the app (only appears during profile ...


0

Against colours Colours may reduce user performance A research that was done on an interface very similar to yours (with 3 button) was looking into both positions and colours. The results showed that the highest performance was achieved when none of the buttons had a colour. Eye tracking maps revealed that coloured buttons resulted in: Higher fixation ...


2

Use semantics to guide visual design Each button has a different function/meaning, but the functions are differently related to each other. The Post it and Save draft buttons are semantically related because saving a draft is an interim step to posting it. On the other hand, Cancel is the semantic opposite of Post it, because it abandons the form ...


0

Building on other answers, the combination of color, contrast, and shape can contribute to a more intuitive interface. Something like the below options: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Where the first set has the draft button a lighter tone of the primary action (happy path, non-destructive) or the second and ...


-1

First you need to answer the question: you need all 3 buttons instead of 2 or 1? can you use different methods of contrast? why you need different colors for all buttons? For contrast you can use not only color, but font size, font style, distance, button decoration. One example is the buttons of stackexchange when you make a post, save edits, etc.


1

Don't hide it: Because users might think there's no button at all (therefore action) and get really confused + stuck. Don't disabled it: If you want to tell users that they did something wrong, wait until they do it! Even if you apply inline validation, the user could avoid the fields and disabling the button will give them no clue about the need of filling ...


29

What is the better solution? The always-active button. Why? With an always-active button, you can select it, and then be told what isn't complete. With an inactive button, you are stuck. You may not know why it's inactive and as such, hit a dead end.


0

Your concern is valid. I suggest effectively disabling the Save button (using a visual cue, like a "grayed-out" color, and functionally in the HTML using the disabled attribute) until the front-end validation rules are satisfied, then enabling the Save button. Useful edit: Validating a user's input and providing helpful feedback as they fill out a form ...


2

On the apps I work on (which are similar in nature) the Save Button is always there but it's grayed out if required items are not filled out. The Save Button becomes active when the required information has been entered. EDIT: See DAO1's comment: "Inactive buttons are incredibly annoying. There's no indication as to why they are inactive providing no way ...


0

Also, it's not necessary to have one submit button for a form, though it is a norm, you can have different submit buttons that do different things, and in that case enter without the buttons wouldn't be very clear on what the intention is download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

My suggestions are on the same line with others, just with minor differences. Empty Combo Box kept along with Button (and if this empty Combo box does not fill unless button is hit), is definitely not good way to show. If your intention behind keeping this combo box in order to convey the user that the results will be populated in this and he/she needs to ...


2

Yes The reason is, explicit design is often better than implicit design. A submit button does more than just submit the form. It communicates to the user how the form works, and how even a micro-workflow like a single input box is supposed to work. Assuming that a user (particularly for a consumer app) knows that Enter means submit is presumptuous ...


1

I would suggest using something similar to Google Analytics - Goal Creation page. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This way the user doesn't have to click on the "get list" button, making it easier to use and process.


2

I have tried to visualize after going through the problem statement. In your use case, there are important things missing. Those are the feedback from system. For example, after entering the URL, username and password, there must be confirmation to user, that he/she has been logged in. And ready to fetch the data from the server. I do not agree with ...


0

It all depends on the context, and moreover, content accompanying your process. To create a user experience that works, take the following into account. When a user clicks a button labeled 'download this ebook' they expect a download to start. The same goes for the context surrounding the email form. You are best to introduce the user into why they are ...


1

One way to accomplish this would be to place a label, for instance the word 'tap' or 'continue' at the bottom. Users would see that and select it to continue. However, if in addition to that, you make the whole screen respond to a tap then, as users become more comfortable with the application they will know that they can, in fact, click anywhere.


0

Of course there are plenty of arguments for and against both sides. I would put it this way though. "Do you believe that negative-positive placement is the best? No or Yes?" The point being that "Yes or No" flows better when spoken, which likely explains why positive-negative button order was chosen by Microsoft. On the OTHER hand, negative-positive flow ...


2

On the other hand, Blizzard, one of the companies best known for their intuitive UI, has done this for their iOS Hearthstone app: Simply saying "Tap anywhere to continue" isn't out of the question if you don't do it every other second.


2

I got addicted to the addictinggames.com website for my flash game fix back in it's infancy and the complete list of games didn't have a scroll bar and watched them grow. I got the impression that in the game in question your going to be seeing the game over screen every 5 seconds until you learn the basic skills needed to survive. In that case my solution ...


0

First of all, try to categorize your actions in groups like 'Primary', 'secondary' actions. Primary actions - 'Create Order' and 'Add new item' Secondary action - 'Cancel' Think about 'Accordance' of these action buttons on the basis of primary and secondary. (as shown in image below) You can also use 'Floating' buttons or FAB for 'Add New Item'. Let me ...


3

In Material Design on Android it's common to make displays as virtual "cards" that overlay, say, the left 80% of the screen. The user swipes right to left to dismiss the card and return to the previous screen, which is partially visible behind the card. By visually layering the content, the user has a clear cue they can get back to the content below by ...


23

What's the issue with giving the user a predefined region of space with some sort of indicator that that space is where they should tap to continue - a button with an appropriate continue icon (the right-ward arrow is popular), for instance? From a UX perspective, you're removing a level of complexity by removing an unnecessary choice, namely where on the ...


0

I think you're over-complicating things. I'm suffering myself with the convoluted ways sys admins use to identify web services, so I have a list of server1, server2, server3, server627277277, server[N]. And it seems you're going the same convoluted path. Of course, this causes many issues. The most common one happens when the user forgets which server is ...


4

I think this can be handled by looking at how you've prepared the user experience thus far. If the game has had several screens with small load-times up to this point, then the user will expect to have to do some waiting at these screens while the game loads/gets enough time to deliver a message, to continue. If you consistently have 'forced' the user to ...


3

If the elements are required for proper navigation then don't think about clutterness, You can provide any button to 'go back' or to 'continue' in minimalist design. I also suggest to provide the 'Re-play' option on 'Lost' screen to play again.


6

"On that screen, the user can tap anywhere to return to the gameplay screen." Without knowing what "gameplay screen" here are two suggestions. A common iOS strategy of presenting several view screens (gameplay and the one shown here?) is pushing and popping views via the navigation controller. That is if said view is a child of the 'gameplay view'. The ...


4

In the game "Two Dots", messages are shown in small dialog windows that have no buttons. To dismiss these, you have to tap on the background. Perhaps this solution could work for you.


52

There is no good way Here's the design logic: Backgrounds are perceived by users as backgrounds, i.e. inert and uninteractable. This is obvious. In order to communicate to users that the background is tappable, you need to tell them that. The most reliable way of doing this is to sign it, i.e. Tap to continue. Note that trying to do something fancy ...


1

I would not use pointer-events:none; on a disabled button. It's better to manually set the cursor and hover effect to the default/disabled state. In some cases it's useful to add a tooltip to a disabled button; pointer-events none would disable this. I've added a use case for pointer-events:none; below if your interested.. Pointer Event Use Example ...


2

From a UX perspective, there are things that could be done to help the user experience by not setting pointer-events to none. Showing disabled fields to a person is sometimes cruel. If the rules for why the field is disabled are complex and not obvious from the screen layout, it is like holding a carrot just out of reach of the person trying to use the ...



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