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Two aspects. Meeting user expectations about UI element placements and psychologically meeting their expectations from a game. I only have enough data to talk about the former. In general, there are websites, which have adapted a pattern where the button function changes. but these functions are generally not more than two, and are closely related. Like if ...


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Pressing "play" and seeing a page that asks for money counts as a disappointment. Pressing "pay for more games" means you're properly managing your user's expectations. This will lead to less "stress", and it is probably the best thing to do from a user experience point of view. User Thor84no brought up a valid point as well; if possible, you could change ...


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I think Rafa has some very good points. For iOS, Apple in fact does not recommend the hamburger button/side menu. This is why they have not provided a default implementation of it nor used it in any of their apps, although many iOS apps use it. What Apple recommends is tabbars. The main benefit is that you see what's available right away, so no features are ...


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Do you choose your button colors based on the context/view or need of that screen (to create contrast, importance, etc.), or are you orchestrating it with consistency and without exception throughout the product/site? Both. Because if you're consistent throughout all the product/site design, "that screen" will share the general design of the others, in ...


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We use the standard "Primary" "Secondary" "link elsewhere/escape" for our actions and never use red and green. Reason red and green is never used is because they may place un-intentional emphasis on the wrong things. e.g. We have a button for deleting an item. This is not a common action, yet if we make it red, this is the one thing we're drawn to on the ...


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How do users get to the next lesson? Isn't selecting "next" an indication that they completed the lesson - as far as placemarking / bookmarking goes? Users can then see an indication (thermometer, segmented, whatever) showing how far they've gone. The quizzes that you have can show if they know the material up to point.


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There isn't really a need to change the look of the icon, as users experienced with "hamburger" menus know that most of them close the same way that they are opened: by pushing the hamburger button. However, if you really want to change the button icon to help improve the user experience by providing more information to the user, then why not change the ...


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I will first leave this article, taken from WWDC 2014, which discusses Apple's attitude on using hamburger menus: http://blog.manbolo.com/2014/06/30/apple-on-hamburger-menus Here is another article that actually discusses user engagement in a real application that switched to a drawer (aka: hamburger menu) and then promptly switched back when they realized ...


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My gut feeling is that if the whole page slides to the right, revealing the new menu, then the arrow facing left makes sense, because I want the page to slide back to the left. (That's also consistent with left arrow typically representing "Back"). If the menu covers up the content, then I want that button to tell the menu to hide itself again, in which ...


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I see your point and I have to say I'm wondering the same thing since a while ago. I think there is one thing to have in account which is the human interface guidelines for iOS and Android (which are the examples here). In case of iOS, they recommend to place the tap bar dock) at the bottom of the screen and the navigation bar (which applies actions over ...


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In terms a reachability for large displays i agree on your concerns. I also appreciate luke w.'s design video sessions. But here some things which you should consider: Reading direction - Page Scanning I guess i do not have to mention studies here, where it was proven that the point with most attraction/attention is the top left corner. So, if this ...


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Both approaches result uncomfortable. Between the two I would choose the simple "No" one. (btw, I'm a native Spanish speaker). Why? Because if I just want to select "No" and for some reason didn't read the other button, when I see the button with the "No/No" I would tend to check if I'm missing something with the 2nd "No". If there's just 1 "No" or I want ...


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Obviously, they aren't consistent because as pointed out, the rest of the text isn't translated. I imagine to a Spanish speaking person, the Si/No buttons only offer definitive answers to a question they don't understand... involving their money! That is a bad user experience compared to English speaking folks with an eye for interface design that evokes a ...


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As a Canadian, I've grown accustomed to seeing things twice on buttons, documents - everywhere - because we have two official languages. It's so pervasive that I don't see it as redundant, though from a design perspective it clearly is. However, from a technical and programming perspective what your seeing may have more to do with translation strings than ...


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They're actually not round the wrong way (from a usage perspective)... Typically, you use a controller with both hands so expected usage is for the left hand to cover the left hand side controls on the controller and the right hand to cover the right size controls on the controller. This means that the left hand is working left to right (ltr) and ...


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Object-oriented actions In all examples of Material Design that implement the floating action button, we've seen an object-oriented concept at play within apps: Email (Inbox) Document (Docs/Drive) News (Newsstand) Direction (Maps) Arguably the concept of a singular most important action creates a nicely hierarchy of user actions surrounding the key ...


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It's hard to say one way or the other. We can list pros and cons and offer opinions but at the end of the day, it's going to be heavily opinion based. All that said, do be careful of judging screen shots. A big hurdle we in UX have to face is feedback coming to us based on static documentation...wireframes, mockups, screen shots, etc. None of these provide ...


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I think the issue here is not what color to make those buttons but rather why is this message needed in the first place? I have a similar implementation of adding emails to a report list and the add/remove buttons are always visible. It is understood that if something was typed then yes, it wants to be saved. Any empty/blank fields are simply ignored and if ...


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While this answer may not relate to the titled question, it does relate to your particular case. I find the modal dialog itself very awkward, regardless of the color of the buttons. When a user enters text into the input field, the green add button (+) appears. Clicking this button enables the submit button (Update) and allows the user to add more ...


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It's tempting to say that because we're not used to it, it must not be a good experience. I think we mean that change is necessarily a good experience... it's not comfortable, but the end result may actually be better than what we had before. We are used to toolbars, but how often do we get lost in menus or confused by a row of buttons? The single floating ...


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Traditionally: |◀◀ means: Skip to the start or previous file/track. Press it once to go to the beginning of the current item, press it twice to go go the previous item. ◀◀ means: Rewind. So why the vertical bar? Back in the days on tape, both Skip and Rewind would activate the same physical mechanism (moving the tape backwards). ◀◀ would continue ...


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In some cases I could see it blending in with whatever's behind it, which would be a bad thing. People who are left-handed could still potentially have to change how they're holding their device in order to press the button since it may be out-of-reach, depending on how far they can reach with their thumb.


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The good: Fitt's Law: The bad: The biggest flaw in Google's Material design resides in feedback when you press a button. In the physical world a pressed button recedes into the background; in Google's Lollipop the opposite happens, when you press a button, it floats, which is contrary to what the user is accostumed to.


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Logically it is a good idea to put the button below the form because that is how people fill out the info - from top to bottom. Then using the button to conclude the task by saving. Does ADD a player SAVE the player? Labeling and form elements need to be very clear about what they do. Are you Adding a player or Enrolling them? I recommend sticking to one ...


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You could have both a previously-played button and a previous-listed-track button. I'm not sure about how to represent these function as icons, but I imagine a backward (left-pointing) arrow as playing the latter, even when I'm playing a shuffled playlist.


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If a web-site user is viewing the second page from a set of numbered pages and clicks the link for page 6, the user would expect a "previous page" button or link to go to the top of page 5, and would expect the browser's back button to go to whatever area of page 2 was being viewed when the link was clicked. If the user had guessed that the desired ...


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Be weary of mixing form buttons and navigation links. A user will likely think 'Back' button is a navigational item not a form submission. Assuming button click = server trip to save data. The confirmation page is probably the best page to put a back or 'Update' link. The summary of highlighted issues links them to areas needing respective updates. If the ...


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Preserve the information when you can. Consider the 3 data entry pages as one big form that you happen to split into three. As the user completes one section/page, that part should be treated as completed as they move forward. If they move back, they should see what they saw when they left the page - the information that they entered/selected. You'll ...


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Microsoft's MSDN Guidelines claim: Preserve user selections through navigation. For example, if the user makes changes, clicks Back and then Next, those changes should be preserved. Users don't expect to have to re-enter changes unless they explicitly chose to clear them. See source Rightly so, IMO.


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I would attempt to make this form behavior vertical instead of horizontal. It's hard to know if this option is on the table - as I am not privy to the rest of the interface, but I think some of the problem stems from the horizontal growth of the form coupled with the confirm button under the textara. And pertaining to older users, a vertical orientation ...


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I think there's a slight risk you might be overthinking this, and placing a bit too much importance on representing the "true state" of the filters. There is a mildly paradoxical aspect to filters that are "turned off" but at the same time show all results, but isn't this just a trick of language? It's generally understood that filters that are "off", have ...


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The answer, as in many UX situations, is "It depends." But seriously, it sounds like: there are some areas of the system in which the Cancel button and the Remove button do different things, and need to be differentiated from each other. there are some areas of the system in which they do pretty much the same thing. First, we'd need to find out whether ...


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In my experience, Remove and Cancel are two different actions and should be treated differently. Remove implies a destructive edit (removing data that has already been created). Cancel implies a non-destructive function (such as closing out of a save modal) or exiting a data creation flow prior to saving the data to the database (such as at the end of a ...


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Buttons initiate a process: Submit, Cancel, Save, etc. Submit buttons can be used by the keyboard to interact with a server, mapped to the Enter/Return key. Links are anchors that connect one HTML document to another. This is a subtle but important distinction. If hitting the button does not save (Post) a current new item (like Save & Continue) then I ...


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When I had seen it for the first time, I was searching for the appropriate button too. Although the ruler suggestion is good enough, I would recommend a simpler option. I would place a see more with a count as an semitransparent overlay on the last item.


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Yes it's confusing and I agreed with you. In my opinion, we can improve this simply by adding a ruler...


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I agree with nightning's answer, but also think that it doesn't really get the point across. The question shouldn't be link vs button, especially for a web-app. The principles behind both are slightly different but often the same these days. A link is as it sounds, a door to a different page. A button is more like an elevator button...you'll get to the next ...


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Try re-phasing your question this way... As a user, what are they trying to do? Are they trying to create a new item? Or are they trying to view a new item form? Even though they are technically going to a new page, the end goal they want is to create that new item. The form page is just a sub-step required by your app. To label a link along the lines of ...



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