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By taking @izhaki's tip into consideration, I've changed the design to the one in the image below. To list the changes, I have decreased header font size to make button stand out added "Play Video" as suggested


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I'm not sure that the concepts as described are same as the users mental model. The conceptual structure described below may be more fitting of users mindset, and thus more likely to get engagement & completions. "Book a Class" "Pay for a Class" ... when visiting ... pay now for fast check-in [Credit Card | Paypal] "Remember payment details for ...


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From a pure cognitive perspective, you should ask yourself: Can the user gather this is a video? Does the user want to the play the video? As for 1 - the fact it is a video is implicit - it requires users to look at the play icon, which will suggest it is a video. But there might be many other distractions on the screen and the eye may miss this icon. So ...


1

The right way to answer this question is to perform an A-B usability test on the app's users to see which design option gets more successful registrations. In the absence of such testing, you answered your own question without realizing it. Ideally, you want the user to pay immediately. So DON'T give them a choice -- at least, not right away. When the user ...


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These have been my reactions looking at the image: "Hey, there's something I can play" (when I've seen the "triangular play icon inside of a circle"). "No wait, that must be something else. Perhaps a slider?" because the placement of the icon is quite confusing to me. "Play" icons are usually centered in the middle of the image (e.g., Youtube, Vimeo) or on ...


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Tania Lang on her article Content Sharing and Social Networking Buttons, concluded the following based on scant research data : Ensure share buttons are subtle and contextual. Don’t include them below your H1 page heading. Give your poor users a chance to read something before they decide to share it. Shoving all the buttons in their faces is ...


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Yes, in top of title, social buttons are take a lot of attention. And you won't share information without reading content or title. 2nd place is quite heat, but not too much. I guess the place after main content is better for this buttons. (Of course if the user pattern is: read tittle > interesting > open > read > share to...). My preferred place of this ...


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You want someone who designed and implemented it or just a guess? Ad. 1 - Either and intention to explain that you're going through the list, not rewinding like on tape recorders (Windows are oldtimers.) See some old player UI, with both sets of arrow buttons. Ad. 2 - Apple took users and did research (which might ended 70:30, you can never know) and ...


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What is the significance of the vertical bar (or lack of) that the arrows point towards? Usually, the vertical bar's significance is that it jumps back/forth to a defined point. E.g. to the beginning of a song. Without the bar, the point to jump to isn't defined and it just keeps rewinding/fast forwarding until another user action takes place. This ...


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Well, you probably don't want to separate Delete and Copy. They are both actions that affect the same item, and are so often part of the same menu that your users might expect them to be together. The action bar is a good pick for grouping actions (hence the name). In order to save space AND have relevant actions together, you might just switch to a ...


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Android Since this is your home screen, you could use the action bar to display a) the app name and b) the actions: In particular, as per Android Design Guidelines: 3. Action buttons - Show the most important actions of your app in the actions section. Actions that don't fit in the action bar are moved automatically to the action overflow. Long-press ...


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Amazon has their search presented this way: Even though they have it initiatively in active, it still provides a way of showing everything (1 star and up) or just a specific star rating (4 and up). As for the "All Selected," it isn't selected at all, it's just showing everything. All selected means a filter has been applied, when in fact it has not, at ...


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I think that this quite recent article (June 2014) about the "Sign Up" button can help: the author changed the “Sign Up” button to “Try it Free” and clicks increased by 212% (more data in the article). His thesis is that the standard "Sign Up" buttons don't work because "they ask for blind commitment" and "do not offer any value". Visitors also "see common ...


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Make it yours is the better option here for reasons already mentioned. But it's probably better vs. Contact Us, as opposed to being the ideal phrase. The user is not making it theirs by clicking this button, even though this language is more compelling than Contact Us. Contact Us is too generic and might also have a negative association, like when users are ...


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A/B testing is definitely the best way to answer your question. However, I agree that "Make it Yours" would encourage the user to move forward in your flow since it is contextually relevant. "Contact Us" is more conventional, but it is also generic. As a user, I'm not sure if this CTA actually has anything to do with the product I just configured. I could ...


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It depends on page to page. When you want a user to do one defined action you direct him with a call to action button. Giving too many might lead to the analysis paralysis or in most cases it makes all if them look equally important and thus leading to lesser conversions.


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From what you've described of the user flow, "Make it yours" speaks to your user in the context she's in and clearly indicates the next step. Now, in your specific case the underlying question is: "Should I use a CTA with more casual/friendly language or direct language in this case?" and the truth is... we don't know for sure. The best way to find out ...


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I like the way Ghost does it. This is the 'New Post' screen: In the right (in your case it's a full width button), you see 'Save Draft'. If you click on the arrow next to it, you'll see: If you click on 'Publish Now', the button has changed: In your case, you could do that with 'Public' and 'Private'. I'd prefer to make the default 'Public'. Just ...


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Just by reading the "Make it yours" it already sounds more compelling than a generic contact us. A friendly and inviting language can be a great approach. The more transparent and human it is the better. From an user point of view I always find that when website use friendly and almost daring language, it tends to captivate me more than the most common ...


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Interesting question, but I'm not sure if you're asking the right question for your problem. You said in one of the comments that users didn't notice the button when asked to "Post something". This could be for a few reasons: Potentially unclear wording - As @Izhaki clarified, this depends a lot on your users' context, but is it clear in your app what ...


2

Your hypothesis is not quite accurate. Where the eye's focal point goes first depends on many variables. I don't think your button would be that first focal point as with unfamiliar interfaces users are typically in 'interpretation mode' - trying to figure out what the screen is all about, only then they switch to 'action mode' - trying to find action ...


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I would also suggest better positioning of your main button closer to the bottom where a person's thumb could reach. Like in a computer you typically focus on places where your mouse pointer is, in mobile, user's focus is mostly around their digits. Also, if this action is taken after reading what's on the screen, it's better to position it at the bottom ...


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Button would be more common way, and looks more easy to tap. Button also always outweighs attention, so it would be good as you consider it as one of the most important interactions. If you are making IOS7-8 app for example, it is ok to use text instead, becouse thats one of the common ways in their guidelines and lots of new ios7 designed apps. But thats ...


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Learning is a very demanding task and you have to enhance your design, so that users will notice the button and remember to click it. My suggestion is the following : download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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I'd never make any difference from the start (home page) whether the user is ordinary or professional. People don't care about your target groups, they care about your services, what can your company offer them. You will add an extra layer of complexity to your website by designing a home page that will segregate your users and will make the Information ...


2

Here is my implementation of a solution. (watch video) I'm not arguing as much as Evil Closet Monkey did and I will certainly tell again many things he already told, but it should probably look like this if it was an iOS app with modern/flat design. At beginning, only the search field is shown, no ambiguity. When the field is filled, the second shows ...


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I have seen many companies that use an initial "landing page" that is just a switch between the different "views" that different types of users will want to see. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This is a rough idea, but it can be prettied up with nice graphics. I have made the corporate and enterprise links of ...


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You might think about injecting a little intelligence into your lesson delivery interface. Instead of forcing a user to click a button, you could simply detect that the user has been on the page past a given threshold of time, or that the user has scrolled through at least 90% of the page. I'm not going to get into implementation, but triggering an AJAX ...


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I suggest that you use modeless feedback, as defined by Alan Cooper in his book About Face 2.0 : Feedback is modeless whenever information for the user is built into the main interface and doesn't stop the normal flow of system activities and interaction. There are already some suggestions for modeless feedback e.g. @HEM, but I will give you my ...


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Well, you can still have one button that says "Proceed". So a label must be placed somewhere saying that if you complete only one textbox a search will be performed and if both textboxes are completed then a comparison will take place.


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Keep your search function separate from your compare function. The user may want to use the compare field for search, but they would be wrong in doing so, therefore do not allow them to. If you put the search button/text field in a different place, and call attention to it as a search feature, your users should not be confused at all.


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You buttons should always say what they do. Avoid vague terms and, most especially, do not confuse the user by having a single button do two things! Also, giving the user two text fields can cause issue - if I only type something into the second box, what happens? UX Movement has an article on naming buttons: Why Your Form Buttons Should Never Say 'Submit'. ...


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This suggestion is probably a bit unconventional. But well, at least I had fun making it. edit: Sorry @JonW. Didn't know that. I will elaborate below and look into the mockup-tool, it looks nice. So what I did, is to make the button interactive. When the user wants to search, he just fills in Product A en clicks the button 'Search'. But when the user wants ...


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In addition to the suggestions offered by TJH, I would suggest another approach: blink the "discount" cell background in a different color when the value changes because of some (intuitively unrelated) other action taken by the user, such as selecting express delivery, to draw their attention to it in a non-intrusive way. You could also add a message bar ...


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Try to avoid different modes for the same button. A call-to-action should perform the same action each time and should not change its behaviour at all. Rather use two different buttons. You could enable/disable the buttons depending on the user input, but don't forget to add a hint why they're disabled then. E.g. "Please select two products to compare" ...


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Show my location. See the top answer to this question: "Your" vs "My" in user interfaces When users tell the program what to do, use 'my' (e.g. show my location). When the program asks the user, use 'your' (e.g. do you want to share your location?).



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