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53

Not everyone uses a mouse. Focus is vital for users who need to press Tab to move between interactive elements on your form/page. Creating a :focus style for your buttons (ideally similar to :focus on other elements) allows those users to see that they are no longer typing in a text input and that the submit button is active if they press Return. Even ...


52

Type of the information captured and number of fields required It really depends on the type and scope of the information you are asking for and the number of fields that need to be filled: I have tested and used this pattern sucessfuly in login and and password creation. I think because the interface is so simple and the number of fields required ...


52

There is no good way Here's the design logic: Backgrounds are perceived by users as backgrounds, i.e. inert and uninteractable. This is obvious. In order to communicate to users that the background is tappable, you need to tell them that. The most reliable way of doing this is to sign it, i.e. Tap to continue. Note that trying to do something fancy ...


49

Are the listed words really synonyms? I cannot provide any references now (possibly because many software developers/producers do not consistently follow the distinction, either), but my impression is that at least abort and cancel are slightly different: Cancel sounds pretty much like a routine operation. You can cancel something before it has really ...


41

If I understand you correctly, you have a window that automatically saves changes for the user as they adjust items. Currently you have a button that say "Close" on this window. Your clients are requesting you to rename this to "Save and Exit". But since the save action has already happened while they're making the changes, the button really just closes the ...


39

Microsoft's MSDN Guidelines claim: Preserve user selections through navigation. For example, if the user makes changes, clicks Back and then Next, those changes should be preserved. Users don't expect to have to re-enter changes unless they explicitly chose to clear them. See source Rightly so, IMO.


39

The words have subtly different meanings. Stop means to prevent something from continuing, but not necessarily permanently. E.g. stop video playback. Terminate means to stop permanently. E.g. terminate process. Abort means to terminate before completion. E.g. abort file transfer. Cancel means to make something void. E.g. cancel subscription.


36

Checkboxes are often used instead... For these kinds of togglable, mutually exclusive options. For example: But if you prefer buttons... A check mark inside the buttons provides a better toggle affordance, and is also more color-blind friendly: Radio buttons can also be used here for the exclusive buttons, but they (a) require an additional 3rd ...


31

Click button to create. Two major columns of UX design are ensuring that the interface serves the users' will, and that users are totally in control of their environment (bokardo.com says it better than I do). By automatically creating the next entity, you're making the user question what action has just happened to them and their environment. The link ...


29

The style of shapes can alter the look and feel of the application and thus change the user experience. Apple got praise with their rounded corner movement showing that a different style shape can lead to a better User Experience. Lets look at examples Which image is easier to follow? Which Image would you prefer to look at (aka is easier ...


29

What is the better solution? The always-active button. Why? With an always-active button, you can select it, and then be told what isn't complete. With an inactive button, you are stuck. You may not know why it's inactive and as such, hit a dead end.


24

It's good to keep buttons in the same place. Here is a use case that could be pretty common. Let's say a user wants to just quickly glance at the additional information for the meeting. It's easier for the user to put the mouse in one location and click to expand (and retract), as opposed to clicking, expanding, moving the mouse to the new button location, ...


24

Why not merge the done and next buttons? This layout still allows a user to continue without being finished with the page, but requires less clicks.


23

Like everything, this will depend on context. However, "Abort" is one of those 'computer words' that isn't normally used by people in everyday conversation, along with things like "terminate" and "submit". It's one of the reasons that in the past, people had to take computer literacy courses in order to understand technology. Thankfully, User Experience and ...


23

What's the issue with giving the user a predefined region of space with some sort of indicator that that space is where they should tap to continue - a button with an appropriate continue icon (the right-ward arrow is popular), for instance? From a UX perspective, you're removing a level of complexity by removing an unnecessary choice, namely where on the ...


22

No, it would seem not, as W3C states 1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum): The visual presentation of text and images of text has a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1, except for the following: (Level AA) Large Text: Large-scale text and images of large-scale text have a contrast ratio of at least 3:1; Incidental: Text or images of text that are part of an ...


20

I would join button 1 and button 2. Then you can have the one that is selected be a different shade than the other (for example, 'yes' is selected in the example below. When 'no' is selected it will become blue and 'yes' will become white). This will show that those two are mutually exclusive. Then for buttons 3 & 4, I would use the same 'on' and ...


19

It's tempting to say that because we're not used to it, it must not be a good experience. I think we mean that change is necessarily a good experience... it's not comfortable, but the end result may actually be better than what we had before. We are used to toolbars, but how often do we get lost in menus or confused by a row of buttons? The single floating ...


18

X has never meant exit, but there's a reason for the confusion X has historically been overloaded to mean two different things: Delete an item. For example: Close or Dismiss a window. This is not the same as exiting an app but historically, hitting the X button almost always resulted in an application exiting, so that is why users sometime confuse ...


17

I would have to say that this behavior hinders user experience. If you've ever read Don't Make Me Think by Steve Krug then you will quickly realize that this pattern is breaking the rule stated in the title. One might ask, Why is this disabled? There is no benefit to make a user jump through this hoop. Basically what I am implying is that the user is ...


17

There are a few reasons: Robot defense. Content sites (e.g. news sites) sometimes use these buttons to provide a rudimentary defense against content scrapers. By showing only part of the content they prevent scrapers from loading the page and parsing the article. This is obviously very crude, but it is still effective. Affirmation of user intent. ...


15

The good: Fitt's Law: The bad: The biggest flaw in Google's Material design resides in feedback when you press a button. In the physical world a pressed button recedes into the background; in Google's Lollipop the opposite happens, when you press a button, it floats, which is contrary to what the user is accostumed to.


15

A cross should always be used to close something. The problem is the meaning of closing. One thing is for sure, closing is not the same as minimizing. Your example for Skype in Windows is not correct. Close button closes the window, while the minimize window button minimizes the window, but doesn't close it. Therefore they don't do the same. On Mac OS, ...


15

Ideally from a pure UX perspective there shouldn't be such a checkbox at all. It is an unnecessary extra click. Users should be able to just click next and it is naturally assumed they are done. However, I assume that this is a box that exists for some sort of compliance reason? Its one of those "Yes I have read everything here and fully agree with it thus ...


13

As a former officer in a pro-life political action committee who is also a software developer: I never found the use of the term "abort" in a software product offensive or disturbing. To "abort" a process is to kill it before it has a chance to complete its intended operation. To "abort" a baby is to kill it before it has a chance to be born. We regularly ...


11

Preserve the information when you can. Consider the 3 data entry pages as one big form that you happen to split into three. As the user completes one section/page, that part should be treated as completed as they move forward. If they move back, they should see what they saw when they left the page - the information that they entered/selected. You'll ...


11

Adding a Save button to your auto-saving window would be a bad idea. It would suggest to the user that closing the window without pushing Save would revert the changes — which would be wrong, and highly misleading. Then remains the fact that the users are worried that their changes could be lost. You should add a discreet message saying "Saved" when ...


11

A common problem, where we have the answer at Norman Nielsen Group article OK-Cancel or Cancel-OK?: TL;DR Summary: Should the OK button come before or after the Cancel button? Following platform conventions is more important than suboptimizing an individual dialog box. The long story We get countless questions about small details in UI design that ...


10

we often see the 'continue' button inactive I think this may be false. Read on! For what it's worth, I'm updating some old research on sign up forms for popular websites at the moment, and have found that quite a small percentage - around 5% or less - disable the Submit button (whether that's the final sign up or a continue type button) until the data ...


10

It means Close. Skype’s is a poor design. Use the correct button for your use-case. If your program cannot be closed, or at least non-trivially, don’t display an X at all, or disable the button. Replace it with _, which is the icon used for minimizing. Hindering attempts to close your software makes you look awful This behavior is one strongly associated ...



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