Hot answers tagged

135

Yes. There is a very simple, effective heuristic that adjusts to the preference of each user. Place a check box in the warning message dialog that says: Don't show this message again Which can be improved further by stating where that dialog can be reenabled.


63

v1 I would suggest that the play button stays the same as it always has - a triangle to begin then a pause once playback begins. But, once playback has started, a new button appears like this: The circle encapsulating the easily recognisable play triangle is pointing in an intuitive direction: anti-clockwise, implying that we are going back in time. The ...


60

These are Confirmation messages - Windows have a fairly detailed page on their guidelines. The whole of that page is pretty useful but here's some excerpts (emphasis mine): Confirmations are most useful when the action requires the user to make a relevant and distinct choice that can't be made later. That choice often involves some element of risk that ...


57

Type of the information captured and number of fields required It really depends on the type and scope of the information you are asking for and the number of fields that need to be filled: I have tested and used this pattern sucessfuly in login and and password creation. I think because the interface is so simple and the number of fields required ...


52

There is no good way Here's the design logic: Backgrounds are perceived by users as backgrounds, i.e. inert and uninteractable. This is obvious. In order to communicate to users that the background is tappable, you need to tell them that. The most reliable way of doing this is to sign it, i.e. Tap to continue. Note that trying to do something fancy ...


49

Are the listed words really synonyms? I cannot provide any references now (possibly because many software developers/producers do not consistently follow the distinction, either), but my impression is that at least abort and cancel are slightly different: Cancel sounds pretty much like a routine operation. You can cancel something before it has really ...


43

A Facebook or Google+ sign-in method can actually encourage people to sign-up at all. Most users value the uncomplicated experience they get when signing up via Google+ or Facebook. Hiding this option behind another click will make this valuable option invisible and prevent sign-ups by "lazy" users.


39

The words have subtly different meanings. Stop means to prevent something from continuing, but not necessarily permanently. E.g. stop video playback. Terminate means to stop permanently. E.g. terminate process. Abort means to terminate before completion. E.g. abort file transfer. Cancel means to make something void. E.g. cancel subscription.


36

Checkboxes are often used instead... For these kinds of togglable, mutually exclusive options. For example: But if you prefer buttons... A check mark inside the buttons provides a better toggle affordance, and is also more color-blind friendly: Radio buttons can also be used here for the exclusive buttons, but they (a) require an additional 3rd ...


36

No. I had no clue what the icon meant. Maybe it's location dependent, but here in Belgium movie tickets don't look like that. Without a broader context it's hard to judge, but it seems you're trying to solve the wrong problem. If you need the hover state to convey some important information, i.e., what action this button will perform, you've already ...


36

I would consider two things here: Visual connection to action Common standard implementation To the first point - visual connection: If you see an arrow that points up, you expect something to happen in that direction. You will automatically look up, not down. So every action that goes to a different direction will feel alien, detached. So this argument ...


32

A button should show what will happen when it is next clicked - not point to something else. When the button above a closed menu is clicked, the content will drop down - so the should point down (to where the content will appear) When the button above an open menu is clicked, the content will move up into the button - so the arrow should point up.


31

What is the better solution? The always-active button. Why? With an always-active button, you can select it, and then be told what isn't complete. With an inactive button, you are stuck. You may not know why it's inactive and as such, hit a dead end.


29

The style of shapes can alter the look and feel of the application and thus change the user experience. Apple got praise with their rounded corner movement showing that a different style shape can lead to a better User Experience. Lets look at examples Which image is easier to follow? Which Image would you prefer to look at (aka is easier ...


29

IEC 60417 is a standard for symbols to put on electrical devices (TVs, VCRs, washing machines, MRIs etc.) and ISO 7000 collects these. Each costs around 100 bucks, but there is a free preview PDF. It’s the closest I could find that would standardize the common playback controls like play ▶️, pause ⏸, play/pause ⏯, stop ⏹, fast forward ⏩, rewind ⏪, skip/next ...


28

you can use a restart / reset button, here's an example from YouTube, the leftmost button


26

I'm surprised nobody brought up the Mac OS X shut down dialog. It presents you with an "Are you sure?" window, but has a timer so that if the user walks away, expecting the computer to have shut down, it will while still allowing the user time to cancel.


25

Why not merge the done and next buttons? This layout still allows a user to continue without being finished with the page, but requires less clicks.


25

No, it would seem not, as W3C states 1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum): The visual presentation of text and images of text has a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1, except for the following: (Level AA) Large Text: Large-scale text and images of large-scale text have a contrast ratio of at least 3:1; Incidental: Text or images of text that are part of an ...


23

Like everything, this will depend on context. However, "Abort" is one of those 'computer words' that isn't normally used by people in everyday conversation, along with things like "terminate" and "submit". It's one of the reasons that in the past, people had to take computer literacy courses in order to understand technology. Thankfully, User Experience and ...


23

What's the issue with giving the user a predefined region of space with some sort of indicator that that space is where they should tap to continue - a button with an appropriate continue icon (the right-ward arrow is popular), for instance? From a UX perspective, you're removing a level of complexity by removing an unnecessary choice, namely where on the ...


23

There are a few reasons: Robot defense. Content sites (e.g. news sites) sometimes use these buttons to provide a rudimentary defense against content scrapers. By showing only part of the content they prevent scrapers from loading the page and parsing the article. This is obviously very crude, but it is still effective. Affirmation of user intent. ...


23

NNG Has a great article on Making Clickable Elements Recognizable specifically for images: Ensure smaller images enlarge when clicked. Make all elements (e.g., picture, icon, text) that are associated with each other clickable. Doing so increases the target size and improves the probability of capturing an intended click. Avoid multiple calls to ...


23

You should NOT rely on hover states. Even if you’re not developing a responsive website, now that we have touch devices, the days of relying on hover states to imply "interactability" are gone. I think you have 3 options here: 1. As long as you don't have other animations, subtle movement is all you need to draw attention to the UI elements—and a user will ...


20

I would have to say that this behavior hinders user experience. If you've ever read Don't Make Me Think by Steve Krug then you will quickly realize that this pattern is breaking the rule stated in the title. One might ask, Why is this disabled? There is no benefit to make a user jump through this hoop. Basically what I am implying is that the user is ...


20

I would join button 1 and button 2. Then you can have the one that is selected be a different shade than the other (for example, 'yes' is selected in the example below. When 'no' is selected it will become blue and 'yes' will become white). This will show that those two are mutually exclusive. Then for buttons 3 & 4, I would use the same 'on' and ...


18

X has never meant exit, but there's a reason for the confusion X has historically been overloaded to mean two different things: Delete an item. For example: Close or Dismiss a window. This is not the same as exiting an app but historically, hitting the X button almost always resulted in an application exiting, so that is why users sometime confuse ...


18

Arrows pointing in our reading direction (right or down) point forwards. Buttons should indicate what happens when clicked. The arrow on a dropdown button should point right or down as it indicates new content will be visible once clicked. Once the dropdown has been opened, clicking the button again should close it. Therefore the arrow should point upwards ...


17

A few reasons why this is a bad idea. Cannot Copy User cannot copy the text of the button. This breaks the expected functionality of the browser – being able to select and copy text. New Information When user is going for the button, he already has an expectation of what it is going to do. Making the contents of the button change upon hover, introduces ...


16

A cross should always be used to close something. The problem is the meaning of closing. One thing is for sure, closing is not the same as minimizing. Your example for Skype in Windows is not correct. Close button closes the window, while the minimize window button minimizes the window, but doesn't close it. Therefore they don't do the same. On Mac OS, ...



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