Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

930

Both ways seem to pose a false-positive paradigm. This can be simpler and not have to force the user to spend time making sense of the color-to-label association. Simply make the "Delete" button more prominent. Make the "Cancel" button less prominent. In regards to the labeling within the buttons, there is no need to put much context into what essentially ...


217

I'm not so sure you should be thinking only in terms of red and green. Red has typically been associated with danger, potentially dating back to the middle ages (citation needed). A quick Google image search for "delete" yields almost entirely red images. To me (and to bootstrap) green indicates success, red indicates danger. As deleting is a dangerous ...


158

Looking at this from a slightly different angle, where possible you could consider removing the confirmation entirely and switching instead to an "Do/Undo" process. This method is often used across the Google services: It has the advantages that it's culturally neutral and more efficient for the user (one-click rather than two to delete). Disadvantage ...


107

I would suggest removing the Reset button entirely. See this excerpt from the Nielsen Norman Group: Reset: Don't Use The Web would be a happier place if virtually all Reset buttons were removed. This button almost never helps users, but often hurts them. Reset clears away the user's input on a Web form, but why would people want to do that? ...


72

Excellent answers so far. I would attempt to connect the dots between recording and red button like this: Apart from the traditional warning usage, a red light has been used in many scenarios to represent on-going work - radio show room when on air, operation theater when operation is going on, etc. The reason behind that would be the same - it is highly ...


67

The reason for the design was because of the technology at the time. Rotary Dial (Pulse dialing) To dial a number, the user puts a finger in the corresponding finger hole and rotates the dial clockwise until it reaches the finger stop. The user then pulls out the finger, and a spring in the dial returns it to the resting position. For example, if ...


63

With all due respect, I think every answer so far has missed the mark somewhat. First of all, based on the Context section of your question ... Context Before deleting an album, the user is asked to confirm the action. ... we can deduce that this is not a success or error modal, but rather it is a confirmation modal, which implies a warning or ...


59

Short Answer: Quite a late answer, but I'm surprised no one here pointed this out before -- it is possible for a toggle switch to show its current state and the state to which it will change simply by having text outside the button, instead of on it. Long Answer: As dotancohen points out above, The problem is that in English "on" and "off" are both ...


53

There is no universal download button that, based on the language in your question, would make this particular situation any easier. The first issue is that there simple is no "universal download" button, other that putting the word "download" (or some variation of) on the button. You can associate an icon with it, but any icon is at the mercy of the user's ...


40

If it's clear, say it in the least number of words possible. If there is no confusion, then there is no problem. "Import image" - clear. "Create app" - clear. "Add description" - clear. For further reading, I suggest the Android Writing Style.


35

The most important factor is that at the time that telephones were invented, there was no such thing as automated call routing. There were people sitting in central switching stations. You told them, "Connect me to Mrs. Johnson", and they replugged the wires -- and here you go, you're now connected to Mrs Johnson. Later, automated call routing was invented, ...


31

The symbol on each button was created with references to sheet music and inventor's background. For example, the || in pause may come from the Japanese character リ and/or Caesura. The media control UI were first introduced by Swedish Engineer Philip Olsson while he was working in Japan. He also had a degree from Swedish design school. The glyphs were ...


31

Users are more likely to think twice before clicking on something that is red. For which one of the two options do you want them to think twice before clicking? Which one of the two choices will potentially trigger more irreversible events? Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red#Warning_and_danger


29

For this kind of filter, I recommend to use button group: Buttons are easier to select and if you group these to show they work together, it is even more obvious for the user. Conversely, a dropdown is not efficient because the options are hidden.


26

This kind of UI elements exists and is used in many applications even if differently. Facebook events Google calendar If well designed they are even more affordant than the usual radio buttons. The thing is, because of this affordance they seem "auto selected" so there is no need of a validation like in your example. Therefore I would say radio ...


26

The main reason was that it replaced hand crank telephones, and thus was a familiar interface. In the hand crank phone system, several houses were connected on one line, and each house was assigned a different ring pattern. For instance you might have been assigned one short ring, then a long ring. Your phone had a hand crank, a bell, a mouthpiece and a ...


25

Since you have phrased your question 'Is it acceptable...', the answer is: Yes it is acceptable. A lot of things are sub-optimal and still acceptable. Depends on your standards :) Is it the best possible choice of colors for this particular action? No, very likely not! It does one thing and only one thing very good - stand out, however it also introduces a ...


23

Seamless has a nice implementation of this actually: Here, the user can slide each option either way, or just leave it and continue scrolling if the condition was not discussed. Adapted from the elegant and modern design of @tim.baker (I would just add in the "x"s and "check"s, to help with clarity and in case of a person who is colorblind). This also ...


20

Grey buttons can still be used, provided you can give enough indication that the button is indeed not disabled. You could have a darker font color, like this: Even then, this approach is not recommended. Seconding Pasha's thoughts, such an attempt to make grey buttons seem "non-disabled" might still not be convincing to all users. Unless you're bent on ...


20

A single button should perform an action, and not act as a radio button. If you want buttons to act as radio buttons, you should use a segmented button. There is established precedent for this in both mobile and web UI, so people are likely to already understand what they do. Additionally the design of segmented buttons shows that the buttons are ...


20

I would go with Dropbox's approach. 'Choose files' is clear enough to tell you the action it performs and concise enough to fit within two words. 'Select files' also works. When labeling buttons, try to explain what the button does. Are choosing files and uploading two steps or a single step? Since in dropbox's case, you choose the files and then press ...


20

Left-aligned buttons below the fields would provide a clear path to completion. Luke Wroblewski discusses clear path to completion in his book "Web Form Design" (PDF that contains some of the images). Here is an example from the book on how alignment can make the path of completion clearer: Similar to the example above, you may consider having "Next" ...


20

I did a bit of research after reading through your questions and the current answers, and found that there is some evidence to suggest that preference for the color red in humans, like in other nonhuman primates, depends on the whether the context is friendly or hostile (Maier et al., 2009 and follow-up studies). As summarized in the abstract (emphasis ...


19

The following is my solution. Using the regular follow and following button, add an additional icon (doesn't have to be an eye) to distinguish whether the 'follow' is private or public. A button-like object should not have three states. Updated Another solution I thought of was a slider-like function: When the user has it selected to public or ...


19

Well, when you close an application it is gone. The Windows OS has no control over how software developed by third-parties will handle this very final action. It is up to the developer to ensure that the state is saved. Will they prompt the user to save their work? Will the browser store the last page you were at if you close it accidentally? Who knows? In ...


18

Why not replicate the way the users are used to deal with this on a form? That's what you're basicaly already doing in your second mockup. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The way to change from the one into the other would be clicking on it, and cycling through the three states.


17

I believe that's a preference thing. The main thing is to be consistent with what you decide. It could vary on what section of the app you are talking about too. For example, your buttons and titles might be Title Case capitalized, while your links might be lowercase. Again, just be consistent within the sections that you are standardizing.


17

The generic icon is just like you show – an arrow pointing downwards. Better context can be added by indicating that an item will be moved into something (a computer or hard drive on the more literal end, or a simple outlined box, are commonly used symbols). Conversely, you can add context by indicating that the file is coming from 'the cloud', a symbol that ...


16

"Leave game" sounds way better than Unjoin. Also, you could give your users the choice to leave the next game or all the games using a drop down button like the one in the screen capture.


16

Check out Google Drive - they use red buttons. I don't think that red signals error as long as the theme and GUI parts of the page goes in red (and that is probably why Google uses those colors). If there would have been a red and a green button, then I would have been suspicious about clicking the red, but in this case I don't get that feeling. The ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible