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15

X has never meant exit, but there's a reason for the confusion X has historically been overloaded to mean two different things: Delete an item. For example: Close or Dismiss a window. This is not the same as exiting an app but historically, hitting the X button almost always resulted in an application exiting, so that is why users sometime confuse ...


10

A cross should always be used to close something. The problem is the meaning of closing. One thing is for sure, closing is not the same as minimizing. Your example for Skype in Windows is not correct. Close button closes the window, while the minimize window button minimizes the window, but doesn't close it. Therefore they don't do the same. On Mac OS, ...


8

It means Close. Skype’s is a poor design. Use the correct button for your use-case. If your program cannot be closed, or at least non-trivially, don’t display an X at all, or disable the button. Replace it with _, which is the icon used for minimizing. Hindering attempts to close your software makes you look awful This behavior is one strongly associated ...


7

Buttons tend to convey actions, while it looks to me more like these are navigation links. Showing them just as regular links (following whatever style in your app) would be probably be much less imposing both visually and as an action to take. You can also take this a step further, and provide some more useful information instead of simply displaying ...


3

When it comes to me, I feel really frustrated when the x button doesn't close the app. Has happened a number of times with Skype. Although, when I retrospect, I don't feel quite disturbed when, instead of a "x" button, the app has an "arrow pointing bottom right" to indicate it's still going to run in the background or will be minimized to the system tray. ...


3

Are all 4 buttons equally important? It might make sense to have the main action as a full button and tuck the rest into a button dropdown. It'll make it easier for users to tell which is the main action and still have the rest be accessible is a touch friendly fashion. The second thing you can look at is button color. The blue is very strong against the ...


3

The X symbol can be used when canceling or removing something. In terms of an application's or modal window, the X should be used to close the program or modal by convention. Xs can also be used to remove items from a list, delete something in some circumstances (comments come to mind), or otherwise cancel something. As such, minimizing or another action ...


2

The answer to your question is, it depends upon how the user uses the software. Like other user-interface questions, it depends on the use case. Many of those applications where the close function only minimizes the application do so upon the assumption that the value of the software only comes if it is running all the time. Looking at Skype or Hangouts ...


2

CTA and Buttons Call to action buttons appear in any given workflow to represent and enable completion of task priorities, as such, they are always distinct graphically as well as semantically; a verb is used for example "view" "download" etc So having four buttons in a row creates a situation where CTA buttons are competing for users attention as well as ...


2

The table is distracting because of: High contrast between the buttons and the tables. Grid layout of the buttons creates an unfortunate grid illusion The palette is visually distracting: you have banded rows already, and then are superimposing a saturated darker blue. That's a lot to deal with when the eye already has trouble navigating a complex table ...


2

The simple answer is to use a combobox like the following: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


1

I will present an alternative view to tohster's definition of what X should do, based on what how I think your average user will interpret it. Your average user's mental model of how a computer works will probably not contain a sharp distinction between close/exit/quit, instead they are likely to have one "favourite" term that they use for all of these. I ...


1

This is OK and acceptable behavior. BUT: common alternatives are: Allow the user to press save. Disabled buttons can be frustrating to users, and after all, there is no harm done by just re-saving the existing option. This also fixes an awkward case where the user selects Option 2 (enabling the save button) and then re-selects option 1 (do you then ...



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