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4

Great question! The save button definitely feels redundant. Many websites and apps take the approach of applying user action without confirmation but providing an undo option. For eg: Deleting a file on Google drive, will not ask for a confirmation. But it will give the user a notification that the file has been deleted along with an option to undo the ...


3

First, I will answer the question you asked. No don't put a cursor on the button. Putting a cursor on a graphic can be confusing, as you mentioned users see the cursor and think it is theirs. This may make them attentive to the button which can increase clicks but when the user is trying to do other tasks on the page it is distracting. If the button graphic ...


2

It's a bad design pattern in the context of the example...where there's just text floating in space by itself. But in context, it maybe a perfectly valid design pattern. Controls have their own affordances (or lack thereof) but also gain (or lose) affordance based on the context they are placed in as well. This is why it's a challenge to build pattern ...


1

A button already has affordance built into it "it looks like I can press it. It must do something" There is no need to increase the affordance by adding a static cursor image over it; plus, that will likely confuse the user "why is my curso....oh hang on"


1

Call the dog by its name I think that if you're running into such terminology problems, you should really 'call the dog by its name'. That is, be explicit. So only provide a save button, but then ask the users explicitly whether to do A or B. Same like what Google does when you modify a recurring event:


1

I feel in the example you provided those terms for 'Save' and 'Apply' would be quite confusing (unless I've misinterpreted). Typically when save and apply are used together (from what I've seen), it is for the following functionality: Save - save edits you have locally made without everyone else seeing what you have done (like saving a draft) Apply - apply ...


1

Differences between Apply and Save In Windows 7 Preferences center it's easy to visualize the difference between Apply and Save. When you go to change your background you pick a new image, then if you hit apply it changes the background. However, if you close the Preferences screen it will revert back to previous background. That is because you didn't hit ...


1

They're very bad UX, and the main reason of opposition to Material Design as a whole. To answer your specific question and why they do it: Raised buttons behave like a piece of material resting on another sheet—they lift and fill with color on press. Flat buttons are printed on material. They do not lift but fill with color on press. Button ...


1

I think where the confusion comes is in your question where you say the options are "Selecting a Tax type in a retail store, Options are Inclusive and Exclusive" .. do you mean inclusive OR exclusive? A quick run-down of radio buttons and toggles: A toggle button should be used when there are ONLY two mutually exclusive options. Think of it like a ...



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