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3

Use a different shade or hue of red/green/yellow/neutral, and use it consistently for your positive/negative/warnings/neutral. Also use iconography along with the colors to enforce the message. For example, use a light red with 1px border along with an "!" icon on all error messages. Ensure that you do not use your primary website color in any messages or UI ...


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You can also try playing with typography with some pictogram. That might help in this case. I had a similar issue in one of my project and it worked. Different kind of animations (shake, wobble, rubber band etc.) are also helpful. For example in case of a hard alert, a shaky animation will serve the issue. That will not only attract the eye, but also ...


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Go for it. One of the added benefits of showing immediate feedback in the button being interacted with is a reduction in duplicate form submissions. This can be really helpful in ecommerce instances where a double submission might result in a double charge. Best practice would be to limit the behavior to 'positive' additions/submissions, rather than ...


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It's fine to have spinner / progress indicator in a button, but try to make the button big enough and put the indicator in the corner, so that the users don't feel distracted by the spinning indicator. A good example from Facebook iOS app login page:


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Your button should have 3 phases if you plan on using the Progress indicator inside. Static Progress Success or Failure Floating Action Buttons in Material Design use a similar concept. You might be able to relate to this example on Material Up. The Static phase indicates the action to be performed. The Progress phase has a Determinate or Indeterminate ...


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The first question is "Do you need either of those buttons?" "Back" is a universally-available browser control. There is no need to replicate existing browser functionality inside your interface -- at best it'll be redundant, at worst it's a source of confusion (is it going to act exactly like the browser 'back' button, or do something different? does it ...


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In my opinion using buttons will be more ergonomical or efficient to use. Buttons demand less work from the user, because all the distances will be displayed, and the user won't need to play with the slider to see the different options. When interacting with the buttons only 1 click will be necessary to complete the action, while the interaction with the ...


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I would recommend the reverse of what you described. Instead of having a button that allows you to scroll, show a static map, as Brett East described, with a caption/button of something like "Press to Open". In order to control the map, the user can press (or long-press) on the static map, which links to a new view with full-screen zoomable/draggable map ...


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The solution might be having pinch to zoom option(with two fingers) for maps. When one finger is used only page scroll should happen. Most mobile users I came across uses one finger to scroll and pinch(with two fingers) to zoom. This may also be a better solutin http://stackoverflow.com/questions/15327783/enable-scrollwheel-zooming-on-a-map-upon-click-using-...


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I think and "edit" icon or pencil could be misleading as the user may think they can actually edit the table's content. What about a solution that shows a Display All Columns option, along with the option to display a selection of columns? Here is a demo of what I mean: http://gergeo.se/RWD-Table-Patterns/#demo If all columns are displayed, you could make ...



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