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6

To avoid ambiguity I would go for something like this: The benefits of doing this is that the user is given a clear message that something is going on and more importantly that they should not leave the current page until it has finished. Maybe even give a lighter green for the "not yet completed" portion of the bar.


6

I would say that putting an extra button there is generally a bad idea for the reasons you stated; you expect there to be just three buttons, and you accidentally click the "switch user" button a lot. Now, here's why it is a bad idea: The Icon for switch user is fairly similar to the minimize Icon Switching users is probably used far less than ...


5

The only application I know which puts an additional button there is Display Fusion (a software to improve the experience with multi-monitor setups). That extra button moves the window to the other monitor: In this case I would say this is appropriate since the associated action controls the window in a similar manner as the other buttons and I'm using ...


5

Pressing "play" and seeing a page that asks for money counts as a disappointment. Pressing "pay for more games" means you're properly managing your user's expectations. This will lead to less "stress", and it is probably the best thing to do from a user experience point of view. User Thor84no brought up a valid point as well; if possible, you could change ...


4

Easiest solution would be to add an underline to inactive links/buttons. If you separate tabs with literally one pixel of white space, they will also look more like clickable tabs. I also noticed that you didn't respect visual hierarchy, and your CTA got lost and the component thus doesn't look whole (which contributes to tabs not looking like tabs).


4

As a user I would prefer the Next button to change to Save on the last screen. Short of that, I would prefer disabled Save with a tooltip explaining why it's disabled. Although, it is possible to have < Back and Next > buttons on a separate row, so they don't move when a new button suddenly appears in the next dialog..


3

1) 'Archive' actually will be misleading unless record retrieval is provided. 2) 'Hide' is also not appropriate, since 'Show' is the opposite of Hide and user may think that there is an opposite action somewhere else. Hence either go with 'Dismiss' and 'Delete' or, I will feel more appropriate word is 'Ignore' and 'Delete'. By clicking 'Ignore' user ...


3

Version 2 looks to me more like a grid selection to me. But I am not your user (most of the UX community here probably is not either). I am also well aware of select/deselect and grid/list views because I design this sort of thing all the time. Your users may not. So let's dig deeper... Don't mix metaphors Showing something is selected with an active ...


2

Do you choose your button colors based on the context/view or need of that screen (to create contrast, importance, etc.), or are you orchestrating it with consistency and without exception throughout the product/site? Both. Because if you're consistent throughout all the product/site design, "that screen" will share the general design of the others, in ...


2

If the overall design can support black, then go for black! But, just keep in mind that you have to provide the appropriate visual contrast to support it; especially by the use of whitespace, size contrast and overall visual flow. A pretty nice example of using black on Call To Action, can be found on squarespace's landing page, image below (also get a ...


2

Regarding "Perceived Speed" - research shows that you should never start a progress bar at zero regardless of how long a process will take to complete. Edit: this research is actually talking about a different use case, however, I noticed that Apple always starts their generic progress bar with a little bit filled in so I'd say it applies in this case as ...


2

There is a research that shows that designers are over-concerned with consistency. While consistency means that users don't have to relearn things (by that increasing usability), consistency for the sake of it isn't exactly what UX is about - weighing all variables involved. Consistency is not everything. In the case of buttons, the consistency argument ...


2

Her argument isn't necessarily bad, if your modals are properly displaying a name/function the ok/cancel combo will just fine for a cta compared to named buttons. Instead of trying to find studies to win an argument try and ask your product manager why she thinks to use ok and cancel. Providing a consistent functionality throughout a system is also ...


2

How about a single toggle between EDIT and DONE ? http://codepen.io/run-time/pen/yyJMKQ Hopefully you will be able to inform the user when changing their data soon. For future reference, I like how Google doesn't make the user explicitly commit changes and instead offers an easy way to go back...


1

Mute button at the bottom as this is going to be used less than your standard volume controls, and should also follow a logical flow: Volume up -> Volume down -> Mute. If this is in the middle a user could accidentally press mute which would be annoying. A mute button should follow conventional design so a speaker crossed out would be fine. Check out the ...


1

Consistency is one goal, but it isn't the only goal. It may not be the most important one in this context. (See also: 'Foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.') The relevant UX principle is: things that look the same should work the same; things that work differently should look different. "OK" is consistent, but it may produce different ...


1

Decided to make UI much simpler and obvious, saved a lot of space in the process! :)


1

Archive hints that it can be recovered. Google uses this term in Gmail and I can’t imagine they got that wrong. If items can’t be recovered, than there is no use in leaving this choice to the user. But if it is not about archiving items but about reviewing them later, than provide options and labels that are part of that flow. Also use just delete and no ...


1

Well, I can't comment on the perceived speed/performance part because you can make it as fast and smooth by just playing with the animation. Beauty is subjective, so I can't really comment on that. The only thing I can note is this, the distraction levels are quite high when the button suddenly turns into a circular loader. This issue can be resolved by ...


1

Well, if you have a limited set of options, you could opt for something like Google's action button in the new Inbox app. The user would have to press one button (the icon representing 'doing something'). Pressing the icon will give you the options: having lunch in a meeting teaching preparing a lecture ...in the form of icons (optionally with ...


1

First of all This is in fact a switch. In essence, the user will choose from on of two positions, changing to alter behavior of some other element - a switch. In this case, the swtich has two "labels", manifested as icons. One of the positions will be in color (selected or unselected, is OP's question), and the other will be in grey. Grey color in UI ...


1

Black is definitely not what you want here. Contrasting the primary CTA element with other UI elements is essential for task completion. The key tools for creating visual distinction are: position, shape & size, color, motion, and message. This article elaborates on how to use color effectively in CTA buttons. I'll assume that the primary CTA in this ...


1

No, they should not be hidden, and not only because of consistency, although that is important, but also because if you hide them, you will hide what system can do from user. User should know Saving is generally available, even though it is disabled at the moment (therefore there are some conditions user must comply with to enable this functionality). ...


1

Based on the brief, initial details you've shared here, I recommend definitely not hiding those buttons, even if they're not immediately relevant to the user in whatever view from the wizard you're considering. Whenever we can provide users with contextual, visual queues that do not distract from the overall goal action, but actually enhance it, we should. ...


1

The question I would ask him is What are the particular downsides to designing it the way I suggested The changing of back and next buttons is never really a good thing in a series of steps. The key word is consistency. Definr defines consistency as: Logical coherence and accordance. A harmonious uniformity or agreement among things or parts. You ...


1

The emerging conventional location for buttons like this is the top right (where your search box is) but that assumes that the action isn't a primary one. I've suggested in this answer to a similar questions about list view switching, that this is likely due to the top right being a secondary focus area (or tertiary, depending on which scanning model you ...


1

I think there are three big rules that must be taken in to account when identifying the best view/edit paradigm: I want the information to be easy to read (Summary/Print view without edit clutter) I want to prevent unwanted mistakes on important data I want to quickly and easily edit the information The UX solution for View/Edit may be different ...



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