Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

47

Are the listed words really synonyms? I cannot provide any references now (possibly because many software developers/producers do not consistently follow the distinction, either), but my impression is that at least abort and cancel are slightly different: Cancel sounds pretty much like a routine operation. You can cancel something before it has really ...


38

The words have subtly different meanings. Stop means to prevent something from continuing, but not necessarily permanently. E.g. stop video playback. Terminate means to stop permanently. E.g. terminate process. Abort means to terminate before completion. E.g. abort file transfer. Cancel means to make something void. E.g. cancel subscription.


23

Like everything, this will depend on context. However, "Abort" is one of those 'computer words' that isn't normally used by people in everyday conversation, along with things like "terminate" and "submit". It's one of the reasons that in the past, people had to take computer literacy courses in order to understand technology. Thankfully, User Experience and ...


18

X has never meant exit, but there's a reason for the confusion X has historically been overloaded to mean two different things: Delete an item. For example: Close or Dismiss a window. This is not the same as exiting an app but historically, hitting the X button almost always resulted in an application exiting, so that is why users sometime confuse ...


15

A cross should always be used to close something. The problem is the meaning of closing. One thing is for sure, closing is not the same as minimizing. Your example for Skype in Windows is not correct. Close button closes the window, while the minimize window button minimizes the window, but doesn't close it. Therefore they don't do the same. On Mac OS, ...


13

As a former officer in a pro-life political action committee who is also a software developer: I never found the use of the term "abort" in a software product offensive or disturbing. To "abort" a process is to kill it before it has a chance to complete its intended operation. To "abort" a baby is to kill it before it has a chance to be born. We regularly ...


9

Historically, the Abort/Retry/Ignore question in MS-DOS was a result of an I/O subsystem which had no way of reporting problems from the disk sector level through the file-system level to the underlying application. If an application asked to read some data from a file, and block 1571 of the disk was unreadable, there was no defined mechanism by which DOS ...


9

It means Close. Skype’s is a poor design. Use the correct button for your use-case. If your program cannot be closed, or at least non-trivially, don’t display an X at all, or disable the button. Replace it with _, which is the icon used for minimizing. Hindering attempts to close your software makes you look awful This behavior is one strongly associated ...


7

Buttons tend to convey actions, while it looks to me more like these are navigation links. Showing them just as regular links (following whatever style in your app) would be probably be much less imposing both visually and as an action to take. You can also take this a step further, and provide some more useful information instead of simply displaying ...


4

Yes, avoid using it. Probably... Some perspectives: Developer language vs user language. Abort and Cancel may have nuanced differences to a developer but to a user, factors like familiarity and friendliness are a lot more important than accuracy. An extreme example of user-language vs developer-language is placebo buttons which do absolutely nothing ...


3

When it comes to me, I feel really frustrated when the x button doesn't close the app. Has happened a number of times with Skype. Although, when I retrospect, I don't feel quite disturbed when, instead of a "x" button, the app has an "arrow pointing bottom right" to indicate it's still going to run in the background or will be minimized to the system tray. ...


3

You would need to test it out but I believe that one of these buttons would more clearly communicate the described action to the user...


3

The table is distracting because of: High contrast between the buttons and the tables. Grid layout of the buttons creates an unfortunate grid illusion The palette is visually distracting: you have banded rows already, and then are superimposing a saturated darker blue. That's a lot to deal with when the eye already has trouble navigating a complex table ...


3

The X symbol can be used when canceling or removing something. In terms of an application's or modal window, the X should be used to close the program or modal by convention. Xs can also be used to remove items from a list, delete something in some circumstances (comments come to mind), or otherwise cancel something. As such, minimizing or another action ...


3

Are all 4 buttons equally important? It might make sense to have the main action as a full button and tuck the rest into a button dropdown. It'll make it easier for users to tell which is the main action and still have the rest be accessible is a touch friendly fashion. The second thing you can look at is button color. The blue is very strong against the ...


2

The simple answer is to use a combobox like the following: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

CTA and Buttons Call to action buttons appear in any given workflow to represent and enable completion of task priorities, as such, they are always distinct graphically as well as semantically; a verb is used for example "view" "download" etc So having four buttons in a row creates a situation where CTA buttons are competing for users attention as well as ...


2

Generally, icons should be sized and aligned relative to capitalized font. Text should also be vertically centered in the button using capitalized height. This is because icons and leading capital letters in captions have the most visual mass so the eye reading left-to-right will be most comfortable for those elements are vertically centered. Here are ...


2

The answer to your question is, it depends upon how the user uses the software. Like other user-interface questions, it depends on the use case. Many of those applications where the close function only minimizes the application do so upon the assumption that the value of the software only comes if it is running all the time. Looking at Skype or Hangouts ...


2

I will present an alternative view to tohster's definition of what X should do, based on what how I think your average user will interpret it. Your average user's mental model of how a computer works will probably not contain a sharp distinction between close/exit/quit, instead they are likely to have one "favourite" term that they use for all of these. I ...


2

My instincts tell me that while not a big deal in general, it would be prudent to use an alternative if you can think of one. Words differ not only in the potential severity of an unintended meaning but also in how (un)likely it is that someone would think of these unintended meanings in a computing context. Examples: kill is problematic because of its ...


2

If the "more main" functions are all related to adding things, you could have the FAB expand into a collection of smaller FABs that give more options. Tapping on the original FAB a second time could execute your primary action. Google's Inbox app demonstrates this, as do apps like Tumblr. Alternatively, you could change the icon on the FAB to be something ...


1

Consistency First, let's define consistency (within desgin context): Things that share similar semantics should be presented or act in a similar way. And its misuse Now consistency is one of the most often misused concepts in design, for two reasons: Designers adhere to the guideline ignoring the actual problem at hand. In other words, the ...


1

Great question Mattias. I think you should lean toward consistency. In recent usability testing on our site we found that everyone accomplishes tasks differently and in a trial-by-error fashion. Consistency from page to page helped our users maintain a sense of clarity and made things appear more intuitive, even if it was an action they never performed on ...


1

Another thing that might work is to use tabs which mark the Summary Stats rectangle... then automatically switch context over to Specific Stats as needed in your example above but leaving a clear way back for the user...


1

Like Matt mentioned abort is a more of a technical term, so whilst we would use it everyday, it's not quite laymans enough. Though saying that, it really depends who you are building it for, if it's devs thats fine. If you're making it for a regular person off the street, they would eventually understand "abort" means to stop the process, so why not use the ...


1

Maybe would you use something like apple scope bar?


1

This is OK and acceptable behavior. BUT: common alternatives are: Allow the user to press save. Disabled buttons can be frustrating to users, and after all, there is no harm done by just re-saving the existing option. This also fixes an awkward case where the user selects Option 2 (enabling the save button) and then re-selects option 1 (do you then ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible