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4

Users are generally very bad at dealing with instructions (unless they have to) so when you have to supply users with instructions you need to provide as much context as possible and link this to specific tasks with adequate feedback. This being said. there are few things you could do for the short and medium term to manage the problem: A- create a ...


4

Buttons tend to convey actions, while it looks to me more like these are navigation links. Showing them just as regular links (following whatever style in your app) would be probably be much less imposing both visually and as an action to take. You can also take this a step further, and provide some more useful information instead of simply displaying ...


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Your two suggestions work: Restore Activate Other options are Undelete Undo - However I'd probably go with Reactivate Restore works well for some uses, activate implies it's the first time, but reactivate seems to fit your needs better I'd echo the comments, though, that you need to match your words to what is actually happening, some possible ...


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This is one of the most common design patterns. A lot of research has gone into delete confirmations, so it's impossible to cover all the variants in one answer: the best solution for you will depend on the degree of confirmation, warning, speed, and likely user intent. That said, here's one approach which represents the 'state of the art' in delete ...


2

Are all 4 buttons equally important? It might make sense to have the main action as a full button and tuck the rest into a button dropdown. It'll make it easier for users to tell which is the main action and still have the rest be accessible is a touch friendly fashion. The second thing you can look at is button color. The blue is very strong against the ...


2

Generally, icons should be sized and aligned relative to capitalized font. Text should also be vertically centered in the button using capitalized height. This is because icons and leading capital letters in captions have the most visual mass so the eye reading left-to-right will be most comfortable for those elements are vertically centered. Here are ...


2

The table is distracting because of: High contrast between the buttons and the tables. Grid layout of the buttons creates an unfortunate grid illusion The palette is visually distracting: you have banded rows already, and then are superimposing a saturated darker blue. That's a lot to deal with when the eye already has trouble navigating a complex table ...


2

There are a few principles to consider: - equal content value. is the CTA covering more valuable information? It's easy to say "this is useful, it should float" - but a thorough design analysis would require comparing the value of the floating item to every element that might be hidden on different screen sizes and orientations. - how it appears on mobile - ...


1

If you want people to read them, minimize them. Reduce them into the smallest possible number of steps. Distill them into the shortest possible sentences, then cut them shorter. If you think they're too complex, they probably are. Simplify your application so they don't need as many instructions.


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I think solution 1 is a good one and I've seen it used in practice frequently. As long as there aren't a huge number of steps the user has to click through to get to "I got it", this is a great way to demonstrate functionality of the application and ensure they understand what they're doing. As long as you provide a way to exit the tutorial (small X button ...


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I am going to say the second option. Any text that uses a standard font has a constant baseline. Our eyes use that baseline to perceive and make sense of the information conveyed using that baseline. It gives the important base for the content. Icons need not have such baseline. Icons like settings, hearts, tick marks, crosses are perceived as a whole. Your ...


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We don't live in that world anymore Some history: The Yes/No and OK/Cancel buttons were created in the very early days of graphical user interfaces (they actually predated that on text screens, but for UX purposes let's start with windows). The constraints at the time were very different from today: Screen sizes and resolutions were a lot smaller, so ...


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A screenshot would be much helpful, but I will take a shot nonetheless. There are couple of factors when you are trying to set up icons/images are action items. One is affordance which tells the user that this item is actionable. This is easier when the icons used are part of user's icon vocabulary. viz, undo, redo, save, trash icons. Looking at these you ...


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I had a similar challenge to implement a switch, which has same functionality as a "Are you sure?" dialog. We implemented a switch, which slided its surface to the left to uncover the real action button ("Destroy" in your case). One very important thing we found out is, to slide the cover so that it is still bigger than the half of the whole button. So most ...


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I don't necessarily see an issue with a page title being a verb phrase, if it accurately describes what's happening. The example given in the question ("Map Streams") seems perfectly valid to me. That said, I can think of other examples where it would not be logical for the page title to match the referring call-to-action. If I press a "Go to checkout" ...



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