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51

Type of the information captured and number of fields required It really depends on the type and scope of the information you are asking for and the number of fields that need to be filled: I have tested and used this pattern sucessfuly in login and and password creation. I think because the interface is so simple and the number of fields required ...


16

I would have to say that this behavior hinders user experience. If you've ever read Don't Make Me Think by Steve Krug then you will quickly realize that this pattern is breaking the rule stated in the title. One might ask, Why is this disabled? There is no benefit to make a user jump through this hoop. Basically what I am implying is that the user is ...


11

A common problem, where we have the answer at Norman Nielsen Group article OK-Cancel or Cancel-OK?: TL;DR Summary: Should the OK button come before or after the Cancel button? Following platform conventions is more important than suboptimizing an individual dialog box. The long story We get countless questions about small details in UI design that ...


10

we often see the 'continue' button inactive I think this may be false. Read on! For what it's worth, I'm updating some old research on sign up forms for popular websites at the moment, and have found that quite a small percentage - around 5% or less - disable the Submit button (whether that's the final sign up or a continue type button) until the data ...


8

Can you support auto save in this context? As long as users don't experiment with the data it would smooth the process. Make it even faster by providing a key sequence for the next button. If that would work, you can just have a status indication immediately adjacent to a 'next item' button, like the pattern illustrated below. If you need to allow undoing ...


6

One should not disable the button Consider the situation from the user's perspective. Divide users into two groups Those that do not currently believe they can proceed, so are not looking for a way to continue Those who believe they are ready to proceed, and are looking for a way to do so. For the former group, disabling the "continue" button is merely ...


4

Usually the primary active element (in this case a 'Submit' verb button) affords the user a clue about what to do. A disabled button is encoded with two dimensions: what do do and that you cannot do it yet. While this might also be confusing it does not leave as much to mystery. It also might not appear as a mistake. The big question to ask is: Why? I do ...


3

This is a meta answer drawing from the diverse opinions expressed. If you want to disable the button, you should still check for clicks and give reason why it is disabled. This has two advantages: fewer errors are displayed, and if you for some reason did not previously communicate why the form can not be submitted, you can explicitly do so.


3

"Are you sure" type of confirmation messages are typically shown after button clicks for potentially destructive actions (e.g. irreversibly delete an item) or other actions that can have side effects the user may not know about (e.g. this item will no longer be searchable once its hidden). Most friend requests and invitation processes are single step ...


3

Users are generally very bad at dealing with instructions (unless they have to) so when you have to supply users with instructions you need to provide as much context as possible and link this to specific tasks with adequate feedback. This being said. there are few things you could do for the short and medium term to manage the problem: A- create a ...


2

The general approach tends to be "Save" and "Next". There's an implicit assumption that the wizard saves when you move onto the next step. You can probably make it more clear by showing a "saved" notification "toast" message on the screen. To be clearer, consider the following set "< Previous" "Save" "Next >"


2

One approach to try is to visualize the instructions. A good example is how Ikea does this: This is print only and Ikea uses no text so it is suitable for multiple countries. In the digital world you can of course translate and some text could support the images. You should test with different images to tell which one is best understood by it's audience.


2

You might try adding iconography (Ear for "listen", talking profile face for "say") to see if that changes the attention of the learner.


2

A "sketchy screen" would be a good idea because you can differentiate layers and you won't lose your "learner" attention. To close this layer a close button under the instructions it's easier to find. You could implement this by putting a big circled button right under your statement so they can clearly see it. Also you could put a tooltip to show a tiny ...


2

Here are the main reasons why the top right corner is the most intuitive place for a close button: A close button controls the whole window, so it should be in the title bar for that window (clearly separated from content). This is normally along the top. Any button that takes you out of a screen (including close) should follow the "next" button ...


2

Two more approaches with one button: When the button is clicked, a feeadback text appears right below the button (in a previously blank space) telling the user that the item was successfully added to the cart. The last words of this message is a clicklable text saying something like "see my cart". (Remember to prevent the user from adding the same item ...


2

You could A/B test it to see what actually happens... Or you could point your boss at some existing 'Behavioural Economics' research: http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2011/05/how-the-power-of-free-and-scarcity-influence-decision-making.php Dan Ariely, in his book Predictably Irrational, says free ”is an emotional hot button—a source of irrational ...


2

I think placing "positive" buttons on right side is better choice since it gives you: faster visual flow scanning is easier Very important is also visual weight of "positive" and "negative" buttons.


2

One solution would be to set a max-width on the content area. If your application is not designed to fully utilize the extra space in landscape mode it might be best to add extra padding or a max width to the content wrapper itself. In addition you could also consider setting a max-width on the button for landscape mode if setting a max-width on the ...


2

Considering your screenshot, as long as buttons for all rows are aligned and all positive buttons appear together in a column, having positive buttons first works best in english and other languages that are read left-to-right. One logical reason for this would be conformance to Fitt's Law by keeping the positive actions first and closer to rest of the ...


1

If you're prepared to put the work in to make it happen (it's not always an out-of-the-box control option), a combo-box is your friend here. The user can do any of the following: Type a whole new entry as if it was a text box Type a few characters and get an autocomplete dropdown for common/preset values Click the dropdown arrow & select from ...


1

It's not very clear to me. It doesn't tell me the state, or even that it's a button.


1

I always do this manually as it is hard to find a balance between something that has enough tonal and visual contrast, but still is WCAG 2.0 level AA color contrast compliant. The bootstrap buttons are always a good starting point for getting a feel for tonal differences http://getbootstrap.com/css/#buttons Color wheel is a useful tool ...


1

Buttons are meant to be clicked. If user sees a button, he would want to click. Disabled button becoming active only when all the data is filled in that specific form is not a good experience. I would rather tell user ( which i do with the forms i design ) right at the beginning that all the fields are mandatory and you cannot sign up if any of these fields ...


1

I think you could display both if the user typed the main category and dispaly sub-catgories if the user started with a subcategory: Winter > Display: Winter, Snow, Freezing Rain,Sleet,Slush Freezing Rain> Display: Sleet,Slush, Snow It is also helpful to visually indicate structure when user are selecting, perhaps using a variation of colour to indicate ...


1

"Get a Free Quote" and "Buy Online" are absolutely different things, so can't even imagine how is it up for discussion. Anyways, the point is: is this button going to be used to complete a BUY action or just to GET A QUOTE? There you have the first part of the answer. Once you define what action do you want to perform, you can worry about wording. If you ...


1

Buttons should always start with a Verb Let's begin where both options agree. Buttons that start with a Verb improve the user/computer interaction over a text description followed by an OK button. The problem here is that the verb your boss hopes users will perform -- "Buy" -- isn't what actually happens when the button is clicked. Would you use a button ...


1

If you want people to read them, minimize them. Reduce them into the smallest possible number of steps. Distill them into the shortest possible sentences, then cut them shorter. If you think they're too complex, they probably are. Simplify your application so they don't need as many instructions.


1

I think solution 1 is a good one and I've seen it used in practice frequently. As long as there aren't a huge number of steps the user has to click through to get to "I got it", this is a great way to demonstrate functionality of the application and ensure they understand what they're doing. As long as you provide a way to exit the tutorial (small X button ...


1

There's often an argument over whether the top right or top left is more intuitive, but I've always found that people used to the close button on the top left find that more intuitive, and people used to the close button on the top right find that more intuitive. Historically the top left option came first with the Apple Lisa (1983), and windows then ...



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