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97

I think icons are the best possible way to convey the information about different flushing amounts. I see too much uncertainty by relying only on button relative sizes and ease of use. It can be a simple pictogram showing the tank in the relative size of water what will be flushed upon pressing that button. Or any other icons that conver relative size ...


59

OK, how about this? Should be understandable by everyone, irrespective of culture.


50

Because litres are a unit used everywhere across the world, a non-language dependent text solution is to label the amount of water used. Typically the symbol "L" is recognised as litres in almost any scenario. Here is an example: In addition, the two labels could be used as "wave to flush" sensors, if spaced far enough apart, preventing the spread of ...


29

I've seen flush buttons with: . .. I think it's fairly obvious that . is the shorter flush and .. is the longer flush. Obviously text, "Short" & "Full" are self explanatory, but from a manufacturing point of view it becomes a logistical problem and those terms may not translate well in other languages. Example image:


23

One button (or lever) which only flushes while pressed Saving water It only flushes while pressed, so that the user decides how much is enough. International There is no need for icons or labels, because there is only one button to press. Barrier-free One big button is easy to press for visual impaired. No additional instructions needed. Flexible design ...


16

A google image search for toilet flush buttons brings up a surprising variety of designs. I didn't realise there were so many! I reckon the small and large buttons representing small and large flushes respectively are the best. And then couple this with separating the buttons apart so that the large one is not easily pressed when you try to only press the ...


15

A possible alternative could be a slider: PUSH RIGHT small BIG FLUSH -------------------------------------- | |===\ o O O | | |====> o o O O O | | |===/ O O | -------------------------------------- You push it half way to the right for a little flush and all the way to the ...


13

The toilets my college use have a fairly intuitive design. (Focus on the water droplets label on the handle itself.) That is, pull in the direction of 1 water droplet to flush with less water, and push in the direction of 3 water droplets to flush with more water. This is me speculating, but I can also see how pulling/going up could relate to something ...


13

My two cents. Any thoughts? I started off with icons only and ran a test with my uncle who is in his 80's. He seemed a little confused but finally figured it out. Adding text does facilitate icons but it might not assist in non-English speaking countries.


9

Among those I have seen, I prefer the "small droplet" <-> "large droplet" one. If I want much water, I press the large droplet. If I want less water, I press the small droplet. (Both buttons are equally sized.)


9

Make it Green I'm surprised no one has mentioned colour. The easiest solution is to change the button colour to Green. Green means "Go" in traffic lights. the type of button that's usually used as a kill switch on a factory floor If this is your reference, I know that in Factories, they have "Green" buttons that start machines. This is likely the ...


6

Take the decision out of the hands of users. Have one button but make the toilet smart based on level of displacement, it wouldn't need an electronic sensor, just a better designed bulb in the reservoir right? Or possibly an extra pressure tube similar to how a barometer works? As the toilet is filled higher and with denser material the physical pressure of ...


6

Have you ever noticed how questions about toilets always make it to the hot questions list? :) Anyway, the best option I see would be to have two buttons like this: First of all, the buttons are equal size, so that isn't confusing. Also, it has water droplets on it so someone can see the right button will give more water. If you make it large enough, ...


6

I think what we can first look at here is any other options besides your popup. A couple that spring to mine quickly are: 1 - A dismissible warning above the cart - offering full cart scope - "Promotional items are no longer discounted when Urgent Delivery is selected". If this isn't prominent enough a dismissible (or, I guess, timed, but personally I don't ...


5

Buttons are not a good UI when the operator is likely to have soiled hands when using them. Auto-flush toilets have existed for many years now, and the technology is both cheap and mature. The only barrier to adoption is patents and the common requirement that bathrooms have minimal electrical wiring.


4

There are a number of things you can do to make the situation clearer. Can you disable the folders from being selected in the first place? If you can then I think this is the simplest solution. You could change the text of the button to make it clear that only files will be downloaded (e.g. button text: Download Files). Once the folder download feature is ...


4

You buttons should always say what they do. Avoid vague terms and, most especially, do not confuse the user by having a single button do two things! Also, giving the user two text fields can cause issue - if I only type something into the second box, what happens? UX Movement has an article on naming buttons: Why Your Form Buttons Should Never Say 'Submit'. ...


3

There's a trend in the US to get rid of the handles and buttons completely. Sensors determine when the person has moved and auto flush. Sinks dispense water while hands are under the faucet and dryers auto turn on. Pretty much the only thing left in a bathroom to physically touch is the door on the way out. Which, ultimately, is why I prefer single ...


3

I think Falco's answer is a good start, but the general idea could also work with the existing lever design: push the lever half-way for a "light" flush, or all the way for the full flush. The lever should take a bit more force to complete the full flush so that people don't unwittingly always push it as far as it will go. Since the feedback is occurring in ...


3

Usually, and IIRC, services such as one drive, google drive, picasa... will direct you to an empty page, with a clear message stating that the folder/collection/tag/array does not contain any element. If your application offers it, you would also have a strong emphasis on the action of adding items to this collection, using the easiest method available for ...


3

No, not necessarily. In the past, designers used heavily skeuomorphic patterns -- visual styles that strongly resembled physical, tangible objects in order to suggest how they can be interacted with. Physical buttons are often round or shaped to someone's finger because the user is physically touching them, and early digital designers wanted to make sure ...


3

(consider this more user feedback than UX professional feedback) The and and or filters are too complicated. Use and only. The user is smart enough to know that city and mountain and sea view will have few to no results. This simplifies the design (Look at View and Internet, my paint skills are limited): It works out very well with Internet since you can ...


3

In addition to the suggestions offered by TJH, I would suggest another approach: blink the "discount" cell background in a different color when the value changes because of some (intuitively unrelated) other action taken by the user, such as selecting express delivery, to draw their attention to it in a non-intrusive way. You could also add a message bar ...


2

Could you create a graphic that wraps around the area where the button connects to wall? This would suggest that the instructions/text refer to the button, as well as appearing to be one cohesive thought rather than a button and a sign as an afterthought. Could the graphic be the same height as the light switches for consistency? I realize attaching or ...


2

Why don't you get a sticky label and label it 'Door release' or something similar? You could use one of those machines that stamps the letters into a bit of tough sticky backed plastic and stick it either on the button or above it. There could be no confusion then, surely?


2

‘Liking’ something is easier for users than ‘Sharing’ it, mainly because casual Internet surfers don’t like to be burdened by the text box. But, sharing accompanied by a positive comment could potentially add more value to the webpage. Source: http://www.829llc.com/facebook-like-vs-facebook-share/ So 'liking' is a passive action, and 'sharing' is a more ...


2

Similar to a 'do not disturb' attachment that goes around the knob of a hotel room. You can create a version with your clear instruction of button on a material thats is suitable for the outdoors. And as another person has commented. Change the other switch labels so that it is clear they do not open any doors.


2

I've never seen a physical middle click on any laptop but I've seen those implementation: Press both left and right click at the same time Three-finger tap/click anywhere on the trackpad My analysis on the lack of physical middle button is that its usage is not that common and thus not worth to use precious space for it. Many, many users do not even use ...


2

I don't really see why there needs to be a choice of buttons: One button should be fitted which is the water saving option and then if the user finds that this is insufficient a second flush (within a certain time period) should then produce a larger flush of water. UPDATE Bearing in mind the comments below I'd modify my suggestion to one button which ...


2

Acoustic sensor in the u-bend that detects the density of the deposit you have made using pulses of sound. Place a single button to trigger a flush. The on board computer can then detect a #1 or #2 and flush accordingly. Computer then charges battery using a water wheel. FLAWLESS. What could possibly go wrong?



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