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46

I think icons are the best possible way to convey the information about different flushing amounts. I see too much uncertainty by relying only on button relative sizes and ease of use. It can be a simple pictogram showing the tank in the relative size of water what will be flushed upon pressing that button. Or any other icons that conver relative size ...


30

OK, how about this? Should be understandable by everyone, irrespective of culture.


24

Because litres are a unit used everywhere across the world, a non-language dependent text solution is to label the amount of water used. Typically the symbol "L" is recognised as litres in almost any scenario. Here is an example: In addition, the two labels could be used as "wave to flush" sensors, if spaced far enough apart, preventing the spread of ...


17

I've seen flush buttons with: . .. I think it's fairly obvious that . is the shorter flush and .. is the longer flush. Obviously text, "Short" & "Full" are self explanatory, but from a manufacturing point of view it becomes a logistical problem and those terms may not translate well in other languages. Example image:


16

One button. (or lever.) Saving water It only flushes while pressed, so that the user decides how much is enough. International There is no need for icons or labels, because there is only one button to press. Barrier-free One big button is easy to press for visual impaired. No additional instructions needed. Flexible design It could be a lever, a button or ...


12

About links Here a fine article about consistency : http://www.uxbooth.com/articles/consistency-key-to-a-better-user-experience/ A few lines The design of your site should also be consistent. Users remember the details, whether consciously or not. For example, users will associate a particular color on your website as the “link color,” they’ll ...


11

A possible alternative could be a slider: PUSH RIGHT small BIG FLUSH -------------------------------------- | |===\ o O O | | |====> o o O O O | | |===/ O O | -------------------------------------- You push it half way to the right for a little flush and all the way to the ...


11

A google image search for toilet flush buttons brings up a surprising variety of designs. I didn't realise there were so many! I reckon the small and large buttons representing small and large flushes respectively are the best. And then couple this with separating the buttons apart so that the large one is not easily pressed when you try to only press the ...


9

The toilets my college use have a fairly intuitive design. (Focus on the water droplets label on the handle itself.) That is, pull in the direction of 1 water droplet to flush with less water, and push in the direction of 3 water droplets to flush with more water. This is me speculating, but I can also see how pulling/going up could relate to something ...


8

Make it Green I'm surprised no one has mentioned colour. The easiest solution is to change the button colour to Green. Green means "Go" in traffic lights. the type of button that's usually used as a kill switch on a factory floor If this is your reference, I know that in Factories, they have "Green" buttons that start machines. This is likely the ...


7

Icons are a double-edged sword. A good icon is grokkable and serves as mental shorthand for a user, improving interactions. If they see the traditional save icon, they probably won't need to read the label, and in some cases the label could be omitted to save space. This mental shortcut reduces the user's mental load. Good icons match conventions, are ...


6

Among those I have seen, I prefer the "small droplet" <-> "large droplet" one. If I want much water, I press the large droplet. If I want less water, I press the small droplet. (Both buttons are equally sized.)


5

If you think of a video as a timeline, then for western cultures, the intuitive order would be: << | > | >> See one of my other answers for more information about direction as it relates to representing time in an interface and how the common left-to-right paradigm is representative of western culture's influence on technology. Back ...


5

My two cents. Any thoughts? I started off with icons only and ran a test with my uncle who is in his 80's. He seemed a little confused but finally figured it out. Adding text does facilitate icons but it might not assist in non-English speaking countries.


3

Usually, and IIRC, services such as one drive, google drive, picasa... will direct you to an empty page, with a clear message stating that the folder/collection/tag/array does not contain any element. If your application offers it, you would also have a strong emphasis on the action of adding items to this collection, using the easiest method available for ...


3

Have you ever noticed how questions about toilets always make it to the hot questions list? :) Anyway, the best option I see would be to have two buttons like this: First of all, the buttons are equal size, so that isn't confusing. Also, it has water droplets on it so someone can see the right button will give more water. If you make it large enough, ...


2

Supporting the case for placing it on the right: Normally a user would read, or at least scan, the content before thinking about scrolling. In that scenario it would make more sense to have the scroll buttons on the right side (assuming of course that the content is being read left to right). The scroll bar position for vertical scrolling is on the right ...


2

For link colours: You should at least be consistent (stick to one colour). I would say you should also leverage the user's existing knowledge of what a link in text will look like, and follow the existing convention (although if you have a really strong design concept that this will clash with, the "following convention" rule is not set in stone). For ...


2

I would show a "Skip" button. This reinforces that the step is optional. It aligns more readily with what the user is likely thinking. It might be worth being even more specific by labeling the button "Skip this step" or, even better, "I'd rather not share my mobile number." (Or, for you Melville fans: "I would prefer not to.") It would also be good, ...


2

I've never seen a physical middle click on any laptop but I've seen those implementation: Press both left and right click at the same time Three-finger tap/click anywhere on the trackpad My analysis on the lack of physical middle button is that its usage is not that common and thus not worth to use precious space for it. Many, many users do not even use ...


2

Could you create a graphic that wraps around the area where the button connects to wall? This would suggest that the instructions/text refer to the button, as well as appearing to be one cohesive thought rather than a button and a sign as an afterthought. Could the graphic be the same height as the light switches for consistency? I realize attaching or ...


2

Why don't you get a sticky label and label it 'Door release' or something similar? You could use one of those machines that stamps the letters into a bit of tough sticky backed plastic and stick it either on the button or above it. There could be no confusion then, surely?


2

‘Liking’ something is easier for users than ‘Sharing’ it, mainly because casual Internet surfers don’t like to be burdened by the text box. But, sharing accompanied by a positive comment could potentially add more value to the webpage. Source: http://www.829llc.com/facebook-like-vs-facebook-share/ So 'liking' is a passive action, and 'sharing' is a more ...


2

Similar to a 'do not disturb' attachment that goes around the knob of a hotel room. You can create a version with your clear instruction of button on a material thats is suitable for the outdoors. And as another person has commented. Change the other switch labels so that it is clear they do not open any doors.


2

I find toilet buttons a huge design flaw because after nearly two decades of toilet usage I have to find out the truth from a question in User Experience. I always tried to find out why there are two buttons and what the size means. I thought one button empties all the tank and the other button flush water as long as I press it, because sometimes I really ...


1

Buttons are not a good UI when the operator is likely to have soiled hands when using them. Auto-flush toilets have existed for many years now, and the technology is both cheap and mature. The only barrier to adoption is patents and the common requirement that bathrooms have minimal electrical wiring.


1

It is always preferable to help user by preventing mistake(or unexpected or least desired outcome) rather being reactive after least desired outcome. So in the first place where you show the button "go to gallery/array of photos" rename it to something like "add photos". If you still wish to display as "go to gallery" then the yielding page should have a ...


1

Your animation is weird. I think it will confuse the user. The classic star/heart filled when you favorite the associated quote is the best way. For instance, if you see this icon: "♡", and then this icon "❤", you will understand that the second is favorites. The best way is always the most understandable way. If you want to add an animation, you can ...


1

First I'd like to say that not all laptops lack a middle mouse button. I had a Lenovo Thinkpad laptop with a middle mouse button for the trackpad (picture below from web). As for how to achieve the effect, you can use AutoHotKey which enables you to write a script to assign the middle mouse button (or any other button/key) to a keyboard key, CapsLock for ...


1

My Video Cassette Recorder solved this in a very nice way. On the page 5 on PDF Reader (3 on the physical document) of the Philips VR 668 User's Manual, you can see at the right of the device "kind of a wheel" with the buttons for controlling the playback state. That strange symbol at the top is the Pause function ; I think they made it different from the ...



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