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37

Microsoft's MSDN Guidelines claim: Preserve user selections through navigation. For example, if the user makes changes, clicks Back and then Next, those changes should be preserved. Users don't expect to have to re-enter changes unless they explicitly chose to clear them. See source Rightly so, IMO.


10

Preserve the information when you can. Consider the 3 data entry pages as one big form that you happen to split into three. As the user completes one section/page, that part should be treated as completed as they move forward. If they move back, they should see what they saw when they left the page - the information that they entered/selected. You'll ...


8

In terms a reachability for large displays i agree on your concerns. I also appreciate luke w.'s design video sessions. But here some things which you should consider: Reading direction - Page Scanning I guess i do not have to mention studies here, where it was proven that the point with most attraction/attention is the top left corner. So, if this ...


7

It's tempting to say that because we're not used to it, it must not be a good experience. I think we mean that change is necessarily a good experience... it's not comfortable, but the end result may actually be better than what we had before. We are used to toolbars, but how often do we get lost in menus or confused by a row of buttons? The single floating ...


5

Pressing "play" and seeing a page that asks for money counts as a disappointment. Pressing "pay for more games" means you're properly managing your user's expectations. This will lead to less "stress", and it is probably the best thing to do from a user experience point of view. User Thor84no brought up a valid point as well; if possible, you could change ...


5

The good: Fitt's Law: The bad: The biggest flaw in Google's Material design resides in feedback when you press a button. In the physical world a pressed button recedes into the background; in Google's Lollipop the opposite happens, when you press a button, it floats, which is contrary to what the user is accostumed to.


3

We use the standard "Primary" "Secondary" "link elsewhere/escape" for our actions and never use red and green. Reason red and green is never used is because they may place un-intentional emphasis on the wrong things. e.g. We have a button for deleting an item. This is not a common action, yet if we make it red, this is the one thing we're drawn to on the ...


3

While this answer may not relate to the titled question, it does relate to your particular case. I find the modal dialog itself very awkward, regardless of the color of the buttons. When a user enters text into the input field, the green add button (+) appears. Clicking this button enables the submit button (Update) and allows the user to add more ...


3

Be weary of mixing form buttons and navigation links. A user will likely think 'Back' button is a navigational item not a form submission. Assuming button click = server trip to save data. The confirmation page is probably the best page to put a back or 'Update' link. The summary of highlighted issues links them to areas needing respective updates. If the ...


2

It's hard to say one way or the other. We can list pros and cons and offer opinions but at the end of the day, it's going to be heavily opinion based. All that said, do be careful of judging screen shots. A big hurdle we in UX have to face is feedback coming to us based on static documentation...wireframes, mockups, screen shots, etc. None of these provide ...


2

Both approaches result uncomfortable. Between the two I would choose the simple "No" one. (btw, I'm a native Spanish speaker). Why? Because if I just want to select "No" and for some reason didn't read the other button, when I see the button with the "No/No" I would tend to check if I'm missing something with the 2nd "No". If there's just 1 "No" or I want ...


2

Do you choose your button colors based on the context/view or need of that screen (to create contrast, importance, etc.), or are you orchestrating it with consistency and without exception throughout the product/site? Both. Because if you're consistent throughout all the product/site design, "that screen" will share the general design of the others, in ...


1

I think the issue here is not what color to make those buttons but rather why is this message needed in the first place? I have a similar implementation of adding emails to a report list and the add/remove buttons are always visible. It is understood that if something was typed then yes, it wants to be saved. Any empty/blank fields are simply ignored and if ...


1

There isn't really a need to change the look of the icon, as users experienced with "hamburger" menus know that most of them close the same way that they are opened: by pushing the hamburger button. However, if you really want to change the button icon to help improve the user experience by providing more information to the user, then why not change the ...


1

I will first leave this article, taken from WWDC 2014, which discusses Apple's attitude on using hamburger menus: http://blog.manbolo.com/2014/06/30/apple-on-hamburger-menus Here is another article that actually discusses user engagement in a real application that switched to a drawer (aka: hamburger menu) and then promptly switched back when they realized ...


1

I see your point and I have to say I'm wondering the same thing since a while ago. I think there is one thing to have in account which is the human interface guidelines for iOS and Android (which are the examples here). In case of iOS, they recommend to place the tap bar dock) at the bottom of the screen and the navigation bar (which applies actions over ...


1

As a Canadian, I've grown accustomed to seeing things twice on buttons, documents - everywhere - because we have two official languages. It's so pervasive that I don't see it as redundant, though from a design perspective it clearly is. However, from a technical and programming perspective what your seeing may have more to do with translation strings than ...


1

Object-oriented actions In all examples of Material Design that implement the floating action button, we've seen an object-oriented concept at play within apps: Email (Inbox) Document (Docs/Drive) News (Newsstand) Direction (Maps) Arguably the concept of a singular most important action creates a nicely hierarchy of user actions surrounding the key ...


1

In some cases I could see it blending in with whatever's behind it, which would be a bad thing. People who are left-handed could still potentially have to change how they're holding their device in order to press the button since it may be out-of-reach, depending on how far they can reach with their thumb.


1

I would attempt to make this form behavior vertical instead of horizontal. It's hard to know if this option is on the table - as I am not privy to the rest of the interface, but I think some of the problem stems from the horizontal growth of the form coupled with the confirm button under the textara. And pertaining to older users, a vertical orientation ...


1

I think there's a slight risk you might be overthinking this, and placing a bit too much importance on representing the "true state" of the filters. There is a mildly paradoxical aspect to filters that are "turned off" but at the same time show all results, but isn't this just a trick of language? It's generally understood that filters that are "off", have ...



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