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8

You buttons should always say what they do. Avoid vague terms and, most especially, do not confuse the user by having a single button do two things! Also, giving the user two text fields can cause issue - if I only type something into the second box, what happens? UX Movement has an article on naming buttons: Why Your Form Buttons Should Never Say 'Submit'. ...


7

I think what we can first look at here is any other options besides your popup. A couple that spring to mine quickly are: 1 - A dismissible warning above the cart - offering full cart scope - "Promotional items are no longer discounted when Urgent Delivery is selected". If this isn't prominent enough a dismissible (or, I guess, timed, but personally I don't ...


5

No, not necessarily. In the past, designers used heavily skeuomorphic patterns -- visual styles that strongly resembled physical, tangible objects in order to suggest how they can be interacted with. Physical buttons are often round or shaped to someone's finger because the user is physically touching them, and early digital designers wanted to make sure ...


4

There are a number of things you can do to make the situation clearer. Can you disable the folders from being selected in the first place? If you can then I think this is the simplest solution. You could change the text of the button to make it clear that only files will be downloaded (e.g. button text: Download Files). Once the folder download feature is ...


3

In addition to the suggestions offered by TJH, I would suggest another approach: blink the "discount" cell background in a different color when the value changes because of some (intuitively unrelated) other action taken by the user, such as selecting express delivery, to draw their attention to it in a non-intrusive way. You could also add a message bar ...


3

(consider this more user feedback than UX professional feedback) The and and or filters are too complicated. Use and only. The user is smart enough to know that city and mountain and sea view will have few to no results. This simplifies the design (Look at View and Internet, my paint skills are limited): It works out very well with Internet since you can ...


3

There's a trend in the US to get rid of the handles and buttons completely. Sensors determine when the person has moved and auto flush. Sinks dispense water while hands are under the faucet and dryers auto turn on. Pretty much the only thing left in a bathroom to physically touch is the door on the way out. Which, ultimately, is why I prefer single ...


2

Acoustic sensor in the u-bend that detects the density of the deposit you have made using pulses of sound. Place a single button to trigger a flush. The on board computer can then detect a #1 or #2 and flush accordingly. Computer then charges battery using a water wheel. FLAWLESS. What could possibly go wrong?


2

I would suggest you would reconsider using just colours. Red and Green are very similar to colourblind people, use photoshop to check the difference. The best way to approach it is: Approved: Green Tick, tick in a green circle. Rejected: Red X, x in a red circle Corrected: if still approved display ✓[edited], of rejected x[eddited] Edited could be next ...


2

Green for approved, red for reject, yellow for corrected. Green for yes and red for no seem to be standard colours, yellow is debatable but might be a good choice to complete the stop light colours.


2

The first issue is, which x does what? You have two "x" icons which may do the same thing, but perhaps not. If they do the same thing - why do you have two? If they don't do the same thing - you're using the same icon to do two different things! My concern is that a user may hit the "X" when they intended to hit the arrow, accidentally clearing their ...


2

You really don't want to hide buttons from user. Even if a button isn't relevant at some time, showing it as disabled reinforces that the specific functionality isn't available right now. And graying out is a good way to show disabled in a flat color rich design. Take this for example. You're filling up your login information and the Login button is grayed ...


2

Interesting is the general form of the question: Does a user understand how something is intended to be used because it's shape is an ergonomic match for a body part? Examples seat : Yes handle : Yes button : Historically may have been Yes, but currently No. Buttons have been culturally well understood for many generations which has let them evolve ...


2

Show my location. See the top answer to this question: "Your" vs "My" in user interfaces When users tell the program what to do, use 'my' (e.g. show my location). When the program asks the user, use 'your' (e.g. do you want to share your location?).


2

Typing is the fastest way to enter the information. There is nothing wrong with letting the user type in the values, provided you have appropriate validation on the field. (If the value being entered was something approximate, I might have suggested a slider, but that would be too fiddly for selecting precise values such as frequencies.)


2

Interesting question, but I'm not sure if you're asking the right question for your problem. You said in one of the comments that users didn't notice the button when asked to "Post something". This could be for a few reasons: Potentially unclear wording - As @Izhaki clarified, this depends a lot on your users' context, but is it clear in your app what ...


2

Your hypothesis is not quite accurate. Where the eye's focal point goes first depends on many variables. I don't think your button would be that first focal point as with unfamiliar interfaces users are typically in 'interpretation mode' - trying to figure out what the screen is all about, only then they switch to 'action mode' - trying to find action ...


2

Here is my implementation of a solution. (watch video) I'm not arguing as much as Evil Closet Monkey did and I will certainly tell again many things he already told, but it should probably look like this if it was an iOS app with modern/flat design. At beginning, only the search field is shown, no ambiguity. When the field is filled, the second shows ...


2

I suggest that you use modeless feedback, as defined by Alan Cooper in his book About Face 2.0 : Feedback is modeless whenever information for the user is built into the main interface and doesn't stop the normal flow of system activities and interaction. There are already some suggestions for modeless feedback e.g. @HEM, but I will give you my ...


1

Just by reading the "Make it yours" it already sounds more compelling than a generic contact us. A friendly and inviting language can be a great approach. The more transparent and human it is the better. From an user point of view I always find that when website use friendly and almost daring language, it tends to captivate me more than the most common ...


1

Well, you can still have one button that says "Proceed". So a label must be placed somewhere saying that if you complete only one textbox a search will be performed and if both textboxes are completed then a comparison will take place.


1

I would also suggest better positioning of your main button closer to the bottom where a person's thumb could reach. Like in a computer you typically focus on places where your mouse pointer is, in mobile, user's focus is mostly around their digits. Also, if this action is taken after reading what's on the screen, it's better to position it at the bottom ...


1

I have seen many companies that use an initial "landing page" that is just a switch between the different "views" that different types of users will want to see. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This is a rough idea, but it can be prettied up with nice graphics. I have made the corporate and enterprise links of ...


1

This suggestion is probably a bit unconventional. But well, at least I had fun making it. edit: Sorry @JonW. Didn't know that. I will elaborate below and look into the mockup-tool, it looks nice. So what I did, is to make the button interactive. When the user wants to search, he just fills in Product A en clicks the button 'Search'. But when the user wants ...


1

Try to avoid different modes for the same button. A call-to-action should perform the same action each time and should not change its behaviour at all. Rather use two different buttons. You could enable/disable the buttons depending on the user input, but don't forget to add a hint why they're disabled then. E.g. "Please select two products to compare" ...


1

You must have a clearly marked exit (Jakob Nielsen - Usability Engineering). You should have two buttons labeled "OK" and "Cancel". Do NOT add an "X", to avoid confusion.


1

For a music-only site, I can't really think of a reason a user would require a mute button. As you said, if a user wanted the music to stop, they would pause, as opposed to having silent music playing in the background. However, if you were to include some kind of visualization or video to accompany the music, then there might be a case you would want a ...


1

The article here covers the best practices for touch targets. The rules are not so much based on the shape, but size.


1

My initial concern is with how the user will react to a button that is "greyed out". In my practice, greyed out usually refers to something that is disabled by the developer. If you want a good example of Flat UI done right, check out this link here: Designmodo -> http://designmodo.github.io/Flat-UI/ Inside, the default button and the disabled button ...


1

Provide an additional checkbox to select all results. This way you'll only need one button. Furthermore the Select All checkbox is a control used by many websites (e.g. GMail, GWT, etc.) I strongly recommend to use only one button, as the action (send e-mail) remains the same, it's only the input that changes.



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