Hot answers tagged

143

Keep the button In this case the button is used for the user to tell the application to navigate to the next page. If you remove the button, you say in your comment above, I don’t think that’s an issue — an auto postback would do it. I have code that wraps the sliders, so it’s possible to determine if both are set, and if so.... What if a user sets ...


19

I say dump the button but keep the results on the same page. Those two sliders are something that users will want to experiment with. So rather than forcing them to go back to the start show them the results in the same page and then update them as they move the sliders. This is obviously dependent on you being able to return results fast enough.


17

Ask yourself instead "Do I need my interactions to be stateful?" What's the value in having the user go between pages? Does it make sense to have the sliders adjust whatever they adjust before the user goes to the next page? If not, then maybe you should have just one page and reactively update a result based on the user's tweaks. If a stateful approach does ...


5

Well the proper way to choose which to highlight is de-emphasize the $5 donation, so no option is contrasting the other, put the site live and wait for the first 10-20 donations. Then you will find out which of them converted the most and respectfully contrast it against the others as you depicted in your image. However, in this approach the research phase ...


5

How are the users going to know how to go to the next step? Without the button you will confuse them because they won't know how to continue the process. Even worse how you are going to decide when to go to the next step in the process? Imagine this scenario: the user is playing with the sliders to see the borrow options and suddenly the site loads the ...


5

I'm assuming this is a Direct Primary Action similar to Instagram's New Photo button. Is it annoying? No. Is it confusing? Hell yes. Reasons that it is confusing: The button is floating. If you want to have a Floating Action Button, you could use the Android Design Support Library and use the FAB itself without any text needed. On Android, it looks like ...


4

by importance of the action. by how destructive the action could be. by frequency of use. All of these suggest that the most-important, most-used and least destructive option be listed closest to the content. I'd suggest using a left to right on this menu as users are more often going to be editing something I'd say than removing it or cloning it to a ...


4

Keep the button. This is technique H32, satisfying success criterion 3.2.2 of WCAG 2.0. This not only allows for a better UX for sighted users with no intellectual impairment (as many of the previous answers have stated), you're also making your site more accessible for the non-zero percentage of web users who don't fit into this category ;-).


4

Assuming that you are targeting Android and iOS devices, you should try to use icons that are already known to users and popular among the Android/iOS ecosystem. For web, you could use Material Design Lite or Polymer to do the same. You can see a list of icons following Material Design for Android here. Now, if you have any icon that is not accurately ...


4

Here are some suggestions that could help you increase the amount of donations you receive: -Reorder the donations from highest to lowest. The "anchoring" cognitive bias shows people are more likely to decide on an option that is closer to the first option they see. You should also emphasize a higher amount because it will draw the eye first and anchor the ...


4

At the bottom Take a look to the image below, and you'll see how placing the button on top will be more difficult than placing it on bottom, even requiring both hands in order to perform a simple touch action But this is not the only reason (although it's really important) The close action has to come AFTER the content or at least on a position that ...


3

I think you have the answer yourself, when you say These buttons look like tabs Simply make them look as what they are, BUTTONS, and then you can use regular button states to communicate statuses such as active, selected, disabled or neutral. Using the UI for other elements than those you actually use will always bring problems, going from dfficulties ...


3

All of the 3 proposed examples in my opinion assure bad usability. I think you have two main options: Show the help text on the page when the input element is highlighted. This way the user don't need to do anything, the help text is rendered when he selects the intended input field. That makes it easy for the user to spot the help text and read it if he/...


3

I think that your concern is completely valid, especially if this is a user's introduction to the app. As Steve Krug points out, not making the user think is a fundamental part of User Experience design. Letting the user learn through trial and error can be okay, but not when it goes against what they traditionally already know. You're using an existing ...


3

Use a different shade or hue of red/green/yellow/neutral, and use it consistently for your positive/negative/warnings/neutral. Also use iconography along with the colors to enforce the message. For example, use a light red with 1px border along with an "!" icon on all error messages. Ensure that you do not use your primary website color in any messages or UI ...


2

I've asked Your questions to our lead ux tester and she answered the next: That is a very good idea - and also proved to be useful - to let the user turn on textual controls or function titles alongside icons on their wish and that is even better when this 'help' switch is available on every page consistently at the same place - but if You put it ...


2

You might be mixing up use cases. Bootstrap might be responsive, but it's mainly focused on quickly bootstrapping websites. Whereas Material Design was created with a very heavy focus on mobile interactions. I would argue that, while on bootstrap you do have a dropdown + call-to-action button, on Material Design the second part is not a call-to-action. It ...


2

Warning: This is an opinion and have no way to demonstrate the validity of the answer other than the Duck Test or Occam's Razor. It's not that they don't know what they're doing. They did have easy to find logout buttons before. Now they don't, for what it appears to be another chapter in corporate wars The whole philosophy behind this is to keep the ...


2

There's a very good read from Aurora Bedford on icon usability: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/icon-usability/ and there's a section arguing that "icons need a text label": To help overcome the ambiguity that almost all icons face, a text label must be present alongside an icon to clarify its meaning in that particular context. (And even if you’re ...


2

Just feel like I have to add a personal story: Well, you know for example my smart phone is with an age of 5 years already pretty much outdated. And the touch functionality isn't working that consistent anymore (did it ever do?!). It happens not that rarely that a slider just looses its grip while I'm still sliding. Then the browser its ~getting onto the ...


2

Highlight the button middle in the sequence. If it is very first button: It will be skipped by user to check whats other options. User may not come back to first If it is last button: User may not reach till the 'Last' button in sequence. As donation may not be user's prime objective, it will be good to have middle button highlighted. It will give sense ...


2

This is a classic example where A/B-Testing will help you to make the best decision. Measure conversion rates for different variants and stick with the one that attracted the most donors!


2

When several options are available for users to choose from, sometimes you can add a corner banner indicating it's a "best choice", "popular choice", or something similar. I'm not entirely sure whether this suits the situation of donations, but I think with proper wording it maybe a way to explore.


2

Stepping back a bit, I think your problem might be that of mixing UI metaphors. In desktop applications, tabs are used to select one-of-many pages. Your UI offers freely composable options, which are usually associated with checkboxes. So adding a checkbox to the label would make things closer to the usual some-of-many selections in other applications. ...


2

It's both annoying and confusing: Annoying because it's covering the images. Confusing because it is out of context. You're on a page where you are looking for offers nearby, there's no reason to include a Sell It button. I recommend you look at this app called Saily for benchmarking. The option for "Buy it" or "Sell it" shouldn't be available on the ...


2

I would do both 1 and 2, but also present the user with a message. Having a message will guide the user's expectation and avoid unnecessary concern by the user. The message doesn't have to say much, even just that the form is submitting and will take up to 30s.


2

Just a quick suggestion, you could possibly disable the submit button, but have the text on it change to 'Submitting...' and also disable all of the form fields, so that the user can't then submit the form using the keyboard. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I don't know about the feasibility of adding a loading ...


2

I se no problem using such a solution, but keep in mind that: When submitted, the button shall only use the progress bar (left to right). When submission is completed, the text "Submit" shall NOT be available again, instead use that check mark indication that the submission was completed. And, of course, Use good contrast colors and remember to change the ...


2

Your button should have 3 phases if you plan on using the Progress indicator inside. Static Progress Success or Failure Floating Action Buttons in Material Design use a similar concept. You might be able to relate to this example on Material Up. The Static phase indicates the action to be performed. The Progress phase has a Determinate or Indeterminate ...


2

It's fine to have spinner / progress indicator in a button, but try to make the button big enough and put the indicator in the corner, so that the users don't feel distracted by the spinning indicator. A good example from Facebook iOS app login page:



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible