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9

You buttons should always say what they do. Avoid vague terms and, most especially, do not confuse the user by having a single button do two things! Also, giving the user two text fields can cause issue - if I only type something into the second box, what happens? UX Movement has an article on naming buttons: Why Your Form Buttons Should Never Say 'Submit'. ...


7

I think what we can first look at here is any other options besides your popup. A couple that spring to mine quickly are: 1 - A dismissible warning above the cart - offering full cart scope - "Promotional items are no longer discounted when Urgent Delivery is selected". If this isn't prominent enough a dismissible (or, I guess, timed, but personally I don't ...


5

These have been my reactions looking at the image: "Hey, there's something I can play" (when I've seen the "triangular play icon inside of a circle"). "No wait, that must be something else. Perhaps a slider?" because the placement of the icon is quite confusing to me. "Play" icons are usually centered in the middle of the image (e.g., Youtube, Vimeo) or on ...


3

From a pure cognitive perspective, you should ask yourself: Can the user gather this is a video? Does the user want to the play the video? As for 1 - the fact it is a video is implicit - it requires users to look at the play icon, which will suggest it is a video. But there might be many other distractions on the screen and the eye may miss this icon. So ...


3

Tania Lang on her article Content Sharing and Social Networking Buttons, concluded the following based on scant research data : Ensure share buttons are subtle and contextual. Don’t include them below your H1 page heading. Give your poor users a chance to read something before they decide to share it. Shoving all the buttons in their faces is ...


3

In addition to the suggestions offered by TJH, I would suggest another approach: blink the "discount" cell background in a different color when the value changes because of some (intuitively unrelated) other action taken by the user, such as selecting express delivery, to draw their attention to it in a non-intrusive way. You could also add a message bar ...


2

Show my location. See the top answer to this question: "Your" vs "My" in user interfaces When users tell the program what to do, use 'my' (e.g. show my location). When the program asks the user, use 'your' (e.g. do you want to share your location?).


2

I suggest that you use modeless feedback, as defined by Alan Cooper in his book About Face 2.0 : Feedback is modeless whenever information for the user is built into the main interface and doesn't stop the normal flow of system activities and interaction. There are already some suggestions for modeless feedback e.g. @HEM, but I will give you my ...


2

Just by reading the "Make it yours" it already sounds more compelling than a generic contact us. A friendly and inviting language can be a great approach. The more transparent and human it is the better. From an user point of view I always find that when website use friendly and almost daring language, it tends to captivate me more than the most common ...


2

Interesting question, but I'm not sure if you're asking the right question for your problem. You said in one of the comments that users didn't notice the button when asked to "Post something". This could be for a few reasons: Potentially unclear wording - As @Izhaki clarified, this depends a lot on your users' context, but is it clear in your app what ...


2

Your hypothesis is not quite accurate. Where the eye's focal point goes first depends on many variables. I don't think your button would be that first focal point as with unfamiliar interfaces users are typically in 'interpretation mode' - trying to figure out what the screen is all about, only then they switch to 'action mode' - trying to find action ...


2

Here is my implementation of a solution. (watch video) I'm not arguing as much as Evil Closet Monkey did and I will certainly tell again many things he already told, but it should probably look like this if it was an iOS app with modern/flat design. At beginning, only the search field is shown, no ambiguity. When the field is filled, the second shows ...


2

Android Since this is your home screen, you could use the action bar to display a) the app name and b) the actions: In particular, as per Android Design Guidelines: 3. Action buttons - Show the most important actions of your app in the actions section. Actions that don't fit in the action bar are moved automatically to the action overflow. Long-press ...


1

The right way to answer this question is to perform an A-B usability test on the app's users to see which design option gets more successful registrations. In the absence of such testing, you answered your own question without realizing it. Ideally, you want the user to pay immediately. So DON'T give them a choice -- at least, not right away. When the user ...


1

I like the way Ghost does it. This is the 'New Post' screen: In the right (in your case it's a full width button), you see 'Save Draft'. If you click on the arrow next to it, you'll see: If you click on 'Publish Now', the button has changed: In your case, you could do that with 'Public' and 'Private'. I'd prefer to make the default 'Public'. Just ...


1

From what you've described of the user flow, "Make it yours" speaks to your user in the context she's in and clearly indicates the next step. Now, in your specific case the underlying question is: "Should I use a CTA with more casual/friendly language or direct language in this case?" and the truth is... we don't know for sure. The best way to find out ...


1

Well, you can still have one button that says "Proceed". So a label must be placed somewhere saying that if you complete only one textbox a search will be performed and if both textboxes are completed then a comparison will take place.


1

I would also suggest better positioning of your main button closer to the bottom where a person's thumb could reach. Like in a computer you typically focus on places where your mouse pointer is, in mobile, user's focus is mostly around their digits. Also, if this action is taken after reading what's on the screen, it's better to position it at the bottom ...


1

I have seen many companies that use an initial "landing page" that is just a switch between the different "views" that different types of users will want to see. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This is a rough idea, but it can be prettied up with nice graphics. I have made the corporate and enterprise links of ...


1

This suggestion is probably a bit unconventional. But well, at least I had fun making it. edit: Sorry @JonW. Didn't know that. I will elaborate below and look into the mockup-tool, it looks nice. So what I did, is to make the button interactive. When the user wants to search, he just fills in Product A en clicks the button 'Search'. But when the user wants ...


1

Try to avoid different modes for the same button. A call-to-action should perform the same action each time and should not change its behaviour at all. Rather use two different buttons. You could enable/disable the buttons depending on the user input, but don't forget to add a hint why they're disabled then. E.g. "Please select two products to compare" ...


1

Well, you probably don't want to separate Delete and Copy. They are both actions that affect the same item, and are so often part of the same menu that your users might expect them to be together. The action bar is a good pick for grouping actions (hence the name). In order to save space AND have relevant actions together, you might just switch to a ...


1

It depends on page to page. When you want a user to do one defined action you direct him with a call to action button. Giving too many might lead to the analysis paralysis or in most cases it makes all if them look equally important and thus leading to lesser conversions.



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