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47

Are the listed words really synonyms? I cannot provide any references now (possibly because many software developers/producers do not consistently follow the distinction, either), but my impression is that at least abort and cancel are slightly different: Cancel sounds pretty much like a routine operation. You can cancel something before it has really ...


44

Some comments: The Go button size should be bigger and present the best contrast of all since it's the primary one. Clear is okay because it's a secondary action and it should be neutral. For me the Switch button has too much presence both in size and constrast. I'd position it between the Origin-Destination dropdowns, where it make more sense "by it ...


38

The words have subtly different meanings. Stop means to prevent something from continuing, but not necessarily permanently. E.g. stop video playback. Terminate means to stop permanently. E.g. terminate process. Abort means to terminate before completion. E.g. abort file transfer. Cancel means to make something void. E.g. cancel subscription.


23

Like everything, this will depend on context. However, "Abort" is one of those 'computer words' that isn't normally used by people in everyday conversation, along with things like "terminate" and "submit". It's one of the reasons that in the past, people had to take computer literacy courses in order to understand technology. Thankfully, User Experience and ...


18

X has never meant exit, but there's a reason for the confusion X has historically been overloaded to mean two different things: Delete an item. For example: Close or Dismiss a window. This is not the same as exiting an app but historically, hitting the X button almost always resulted in an application exiting, so that is why users sometime confuse ...


16

The style of shapes can alter the look and feel of the application and thus change the user experience. Apple got praise with their rounded corner movement showing that a different style shape can lead to a better User Experience. Lets look at examples Which image is easier to follow? Which Image would you prefer to look at (aka is easier ...


15

A cross should always be used to close something. The problem is the meaning of closing. One thing is for sure, closing is not the same as minimizing. Your example for Skype in Windows is not correct. Close button closes the window, while the minimize window button minimizes the window, but doesn't close it. Therefore they don't do the same. On Mac OS, ...


13

As a former officer in a pro-life political action committee who is also a software developer: I never found the use of the term "abort" in a software product offensive or disturbing. To "abort" a process is to kill it before it has a chance to complete its intended operation. To "abort" a baby is to kill it before it has a chance to be born. We regularly ...


9

Historically, the Abort/Retry/Ignore question in MS-DOS was a result of an I/O subsystem which had no way of reporting problems from the disk sector level through the file-system level to the underlying application. If an application asked to read some data from a file, and block 1571 of the disk was unreadable, there was no defined mechanism by which DOS ...


9

It means Close. Skype’s is a poor design. Use the correct button for your use-case. If your program cannot be closed, or at least non-trivially, don’t display an X at all, or disable the button. Replace it with _, which is the icon used for minimizing. Hindering attempts to close your software makes you look awful This behavior is one strongly associated ...


9

One solution is to visually separate your button by priority. You'd typically have primary button(s), secondary button(s) and sometimes tertiary button(s) and/or non-preferred action buttons. For Primary and Secondary, I usually suggest your preferred branding color (purely subjective) in two levels of contrast. High contrast for primary, slightly less ...


7

Buttons tend to convey actions, while it looks to me more like these are navigation links. Showing them just as regular links (following whatever style in your app) would be probably be much less imposing both visually and as an action to take. You can also take this a step further, and provide some more useful information instead of simply displaying ...


7

The problem is in having something that looks flat and yet stands out enough to look touchable. To add touchable cues you need to put some kind of border around each independently touchable thing - to separate it from the adjacent touchable thing, and to make the figure stand out from the ground. Google's material design principles provide some ...


5

I believe this solution gives equal prominence to each option and is seen on many iOS interfaces:


4

Yes, avoid using it. Probably... Some perspectives: Developer language vs user language. Abort and Cancel may have nuanced differences to a developer but to a user, factors like familiarity and friendliness are a lot more important than accuracy. An extreme example of user-language vs developer-language is placebo buttons which do absolutely nothing ...


3

You would need to test it out but I believe that one of these buttons would more clearly communicate the described action to the user...


3

When it comes to me, I feel really frustrated when the x button doesn't close the app. Has happened a number of times with Skype. Although, when I retrospect, I don't feel quite disturbed when, instead of a "x" button, the app has an "arrow pointing bottom right" to indicate it's still going to run in the background or will be minimized to the system tray. ...


3

The table is distracting because of: High contrast between the buttons and the tables. Grid layout of the buttons creates an unfortunate grid illusion The palette is visually distracting: you have banded rows already, and then are superimposing a saturated darker blue. That's a lot to deal with when the eye already has trouble navigating a complex table ...


3

Are all 4 buttons equally important? It might make sense to have the main action as a full button and tuck the rest into a button dropdown. It'll make it easier for users to tell which is the main action and still have the rest be accessible is a touch friendly fashion. The second thing you can look at is button color. The blue is very strong against the ...


3

The X symbol can be used when canceling or removing something. In terms of an application's or modal window, the X should be used to close the program or modal by convention. Xs can also be used to remove items from a list, delete something in some circumstances (comments come to mind), or otherwise cancel something. As such, minimizing or another action ...


2

The answer to your question is, it depends upon how the user uses the software. Like other user-interface questions, it depends on the use case. Many of those applications where the close function only minimizes the application do so upon the assumption that the value of the software only comes if it is running all the time. Looking at Skype or Hangouts ...


2

CTA and Buttons Call to action buttons appear in any given workflow to represent and enable completion of task priorities, as such, they are always distinct graphically as well as semantically; a verb is used for example "view" "download" etc So having four buttons in a row creates a situation where CTA buttons are competing for users attention as well as ...


2

The simple answer is to use a combobox like the following: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

Best practice for "download" buttons is don't make them flashy or look like spam. We're all used to fake download buttons. Make it clean. I'd recommend you use flat design for it so that it stands out from all of the 90's era buttons that are still all over the web to get you to download trojans.


2

I will present an alternative view to tohster's definition of what X should do, based on what how I think your average user will interpret it. Your average user's mental model of how a computer works will probably not contain a sharp distinction between close/exit/quit, instead they are likely to have one "favourite" term that they use for all of these. I ...


2

My instincts tell me that while not a big deal in general, it would be prudent to use an alternative if you can think of one. Words differ not only in the potential severity of an unintended meaning but also in how (un)likely it is that someone would think of these unintended meanings in a computing context. Examples: kill is problematic because of its ...


2

If the "more main" functions are all related to adding things, you could have the FAB expand into a collection of smaller FABs that give more options. Tapping on the original FAB a second time could execute your primary action. Google's Inbox app demonstrates this, as do apps like Tumblr. Alternatively, you could change the icon on the FAB to be something ...


2

The problem with the "split button" is that it is not just one control but that it is presented as one. I've seen people pressing the button while expecting opening the menu. Since they are seperate controls my first impression was to focus on A when pressing the tab key, and focus on B when pressing tab again. But I agree with @AlexeyKolchenko that it ...


2

One option (which I think is essentially what method 2 is doing) is to consolidate the "change" options into a single option, so the choice is between "make a change" and "cancel." I would just call the main call-to-action "Change Payment" or "Make a Change," etc., instead of "Reallocate Methods." Then you would give them all 3 change options on the next ...


2

Bob has, I think the correct answer. I'd add two considerations specifically for your site: If it's a new, consumer-facing site, then the consumer will already have a learning curve to climb with understanding your site. Making that curve more difficult by introducing non-standard/unusual control designs makes for a worse learning experience (and ...



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