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An additional point that may well be worth noting is that if the user is using a text only browser or possibly a mobile browser with very limited bandwidth they may well get the link that they need to click, especially if the author has been consistent on using the alt= on images that are also links, to go to the actual final page that they are looking for ...


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Browsers take a very simple approach to loading web pages; they start at the top of the html document and they work their way down to the bottom, that's it. The intention is to not make you wait for anything. As soon as a browser has read the document it will try and display it, trying to provide the content of the document to you as fast as it possibly ...


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Technically this is caused by the fact that images and other assets are generally hosted separately, and the browser only knows to go fetch them when the document uses them. It would be technically possible to delay displaying anything to the user until all the assets were ready (a lot of old-school Flash sites did this for instance, with a loading screen ...


2

If I'm understanding correctly, I think the question should be "Why sites loads websites gradually?" . See to answer your strict question, browsers do whatever you (where you is the developer, site owner, etc) tell them to do. There's no magic, if you tell the browser "do A, then B, then C" that's exactly what the browser will do. However, if the question ...


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I think the answer here has to be a very firm "it depends". It sounds to me like you need a few different things: A means to see an individual object that you're currently looking at, and clearly see both the common properties and the specific properties for that type of object. A means to see where that object is connected to other objects, and the ...


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Tags are the first thing that spring to mind. Consider the StackExchange's own various subsite tags (for example you've tagged this as GUI Design, Browser and Relations related) This lets you stamp whatever area you're in with the tags that relate to it, and allow people to navigate to other places with those same tags by clicking on them, as well as ...


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The Shopify backend comes to mind. On the left you have the main navigation. Every directory has a sub directory. When a sub directory is selected (like in the image) the main directory folds in. This will keep the main directory still visible and accessible.


5

The time element is a machine-readable element. So it is mainly used to help out the computer not the user directly. https://css-tricks.com/time-element/ The element in HTML represents a machine-readable date, time, or duration. It can be useful for creating event scheduling, archiving, and other time-based functions. and The uses of ...



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