Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

96

It strikes me that you probably should have researched your userbase before building the site. But hey, you're in this situation now so you need to deal with it as you find it. I am not surprised that hospitals / academic institutions are using IE7. Performing an entire refresh of the OS, browers, hardware etc. is a very costly exercise, so you'll likely ...


88

It's called abstraction. Greatest achievement of mankind, I think. If we abstract things in our mind, we can use them with lesser cognitive efforts and integrate them better in our lifes and thinking-models. For example the Internet, it's not a real place: it's a bunch of tubes...I mean servers, to which we send requests, but it is easier to handle if we ...


57

You want your users to use your service. Your users want to use the service but they need to invest first (i.e. time to upgrade their browser). Ideas: First of all be nice and show an empathic message, e.g. like Apple does if you run a browser that's not supported by iCloud Tell them why it's worth investing the time (list benefits, preview what they can ...


55

Updated Answer - March 2013 Since this answer was posted on November 2012, Google has discontinued this plugin. While it might still work as of today (March, 2014) there is no guarantee of it working in the future. As of January 2014, support for Chrome Frame is discontinued: http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2013/06/chrome-frame-discontinued.html Given ...


54

The historical reason is that that's what the spacebar does in more, the lowest common demoninator (and probably oldest) of text pagers. In more, it makes sense to map the largest key on the keyboard to the most common action: show the next page. In the glory days of more, you couldn't count on mouse scrollwheels, page down buttons, or sometimes even arrow ...


40

Chrome does the same thing: There are two reasons for this: It makes it hard to click close on accident. This is easiest to note on the Chrome example, if every one of those super teeny tabs had an X, it would be extremely difficult to select a tab without closing it. Prefer safe actions. If you have a safe action and a risky action, the risky action ...


38

You might want to briefly try explaining the value of upgrading, while promoting the action with positive language, and demoting the negative action with not exactly negative language, but just less positive. You also need to provide information for those who are unable to upgrade (for example corporate restrictions may prevent use of anything except IE6), ...


34

Windows Internet Explorer 8 is also no longer supported, so if you use it (or any other browser) to surf the web, you might be exposing your PC to additional threats. Ref: Windows XP support has ended It is safe to address this to IT of the hospital that they need to upgrade to at least IE 9 due to safety reasons.


32

What We Know So Far: The first browser did not use Backspace to go back a page: Several Mosaic menu or button functions have keyboard equivalents. Among them: b, equivalent to the Back button Source: http://www.uoxray.uoregon.edu/local/manuals/biosym/discovery/Html_Help/navigating.html First Netscape Navigator (evolved from Mosaic) Did Not Use ...


30

I really want to say "never!", but as with all things, there are exceptions. As mattlant mentioned it can be because there are items on the page that cannot be lost, help pages can be good for this, as the user may be half way through filling out a form when they click 'help' and are going to be pretty annoyed if they lose all their entries (although a ...


27

The spacebar is the largest key of your keyboard, and is consequently the easiest one to interact with. For that reason, apps tend to use the spacebar for: a simple action: where no input, precision or direction is involved. a repeated action: the spacebar is the easiest to press several times in a row. a "forgivable" action: if you accidentally press it, ...


26

If you are in a corporate setting, then you have control over your users. There are various ways you can lock them down to what browser they are allowed to use, whether its through an Image, Group Policy, Firewall settings, etc. Now, by you, I obviously mean those in the company that have the permissions to do so. However, if you don't want to jump ...


25

I don't know how it started but I can add my two cents about what ALL my clients say: $%!$% what the @$#%#% just happened? Why did the page change? Now I have to fill in that form all over again. I would love to see this go away for good, and the first thing I do when building a form laden website is the following jQuery script: var hasfocus = 'false'; ...


25

Don't blame the user for their situation. This is not about who's right, and what's correct. The last thing you want to do, from a UX perspective, is judge your users. A modal dialog telling them to upgrade is the ultimate form of self-righteousness. They are not you, it is not their responsibility to know about browsers and stuff. You may feel like it is, ...


24

You could do what this GIANT Austrailian company did and charge an extra "tax" for old browsers in compensation for having to support them Kogan.com 'It appears you or your system administrator has been in a coma for over 5 years and you are still using IE7.' It begins, before going on to break the news about the costs. 'To help make the internet a ...


19

I don't have any evidence that this is the reason the spacebar is used for page down, but back in the day when IBM was setting PC design standards (that still heavily influence the design today), the original IBM AT 84-key keyboard from 1981 (IIRC) did not have page up/down or dedicated arrow keys (they shared the number pad): The standard 101-key ...


18

The interfaces may look very similar to you, but they are constantly evolving, and have been refined for many years. Firefox in particular is very open about their UX process, and how they rely on user telemetry to understand how people use their browser. They don't simply copy features. They try to understand their users. In the early days, browsers could ...


17

Probably for the same reason that computers have 'files' and 'folders'. The concept of accessing information from (great) distances, like going some place or browsing things displayed at a place is easier to grasp that the technical truth.


16

I can't believe no-one's mentioned it, but PDFs and other non-web documents should be opened in a new window, mainly because users who do not understand windows/tabs/embedded plugins have a greater expectation of that behaviour than the 'replace web page with PDF' behaviour of 'same window' linking.


16

It's consistently been shown that Firefox is more popular with younger demographics than IE and Chrome is the most popular browser amongst young and tech savvy users. IE is still most used by older users. Don't take this to mean you can assume your IE users are old or that your Chrome users are young, however. Historically it's certainly been the case that ...


13

It's a matter of abstracting relationship and direction. The reason why the direction for the metaphor is one from here to there is because of goal oriented perception. Or in other words, the essential and for the context of this metaphor defining idea is that: information is not here, otherwise I wouldn't be needing to look for it information is in other ...


12

What it is the value of WYSIWIG? It provides immediacy and the ability to fiddle quickly. Bret Victor capures it perfectly in this video where he shows the importance of immediacy in the creative process during the coding of animations and games. Creativity benefits hugely from experimentation, playing and being in the moment. You can't achieve that by ...


12

Many people have only a fuzzy awareness of the distinction between "The Web" and Google / Yahoo / whatever their homepage is set to. Therefore, such people often use the Google search box (or whatever) to enter URLs rather than the browser address bar. Google may have noticed this behaviour when developing the combined URL/search box in Chrome.


11

Did a quick Google search for "how many tabs to people use". Here's the top link http://dubroy.com/blog/how-many-tabs-do-people-use-now-with-real-data/ First, we saw that people who use tabs heavily can create 2 to 3 times as many tabs as other users. It’s not obvious what the cause for the bi-modality in the distribution is though. ... we see that ...


10

I think it's about time URLs in general got abstracted out of sight of ordinary users. Most people couldn't care less about this dotted syntax, the TLDs, the sub-domains, not to mention the protocol part. It's too bad that the current state of technology doesn't offer a superior alternative. Your aunt doesn't care about URLs. If she even knows which site ...


10

Jennifer Morrow (part of the Firefox user experience design team) wrote a pretty detailed blog post about removing the Firefox status bar in 2010. As already mentioned, the aim was to remove the unnecessary "chrome" from the Firefox UI. I'd recommend you read the whole post. A short extract: The goal is to find places where chrome can be minimized, both ...


10

How did this come about? In 2005 this was implemented on Mozilla Firefox for the following reasons: The backspace key was mapped to the browser ‘Back’ function in Mozilla for consistency with Internet Explorer. However, to improve consistency with other applications running on Linux, it was decided that this mapping should be optional—and set ...


9

Maybe, maybe not, but it is not "bad" because it violates a "rule". Rules don't always work in all situations. One of the main reasons designers exist is to decide when rules ought to be broken, or what rules are useful in a given scenario. For instance, there are (at least) two general "rules" (I prefer the terms guidelines or patterns, for the record) ...


9

But UX point of view no end user going to re-size and view as mobile/tablet. What makes you think this? People resize browser windows all of the time. Cant we just disable media queries if desktop browser, what are the advantages of not doing so.? What are the advantages of disabling them? It should make the experience better. There doesn't ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible