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32

Sometimes things exist not because they still make sense, but because their presence is an affordance -- i.e. it works not because it's good, but because the visitor understands what it is, what it does, and how to use it, because they've been inculcated over years with this knowledge. The "I'm Feeling Lucky" button is a grand example of this, because as ...


18

Interestingly, the button costs google up to $110 million per year. In 2007, Google search boss Marissa Mayer estimated that 1% of all Google searches go through the I'm Feeling Lucky button – skipping Google's search results pages entirely. That meant that Google showed ZERO ads (and therefore got ZERO ad clicks) on 1% of all Google search queries. ...


11

Having the company tagline on the homepage is Jacob Neilson's guideline #1 for company homepages. It's also one of the most frequently broken guideline for the exact reasons you and other answers have stated. Even well-known companies presumably hope to attract new customers and should tell first-time visitors about the site's purpose. It is especially ...


11

When they first see the site in search results, on a billboard, or in text, I'd expect most to be more attracted to a website with a clear simple name like news.com However upon visiting the website for a few times, a more distinct and original name may provide better branding opportunities and so serve to attract repeated visits from users who don't have ...


10

Great question. From the viewpoint of an evil rhetorician, the short answer is "build a more convincing argument." You're already asking that, so it seems what you need is techniques to improve your argument and, in turn, your persuasiveness. I've found that one of the best ways to get buy-in is to get the client to come to your own decision without feeling ...


7

After thinking about this question for the last couple months and reading some related literature (Stephen P. Anderson's Seductive Interaction Design in particular), I've decided that the continuing existence of the button is likely due to a combination of three factors: Branding - As @RachelKeslensky writes in her answer: keeping the button says "Yes, ...


5

Up-vote/Down-vote are quite neutral (in terms of branding and word-association) and give you a good measure of support the post/person has.


5

I think the most important thing is your audience, and whether the name fits the content. I'll compare Huffington Post and Fark.com, not entirely comparable niches but good examples of different naming paradigms and audiences. Huffington Post sounds like a newspaper. They're trying to be a newspaper (less the paper). You see the name and it sounds like a ...


5

I would be wary of stereotyping your audience, particularly in terms of something as personal as colour choice! :) You haven't given the exact purpose of your start up, so I'm unclear as to whether the aim of the site is to provide an immediate service (e.g. you're selling stuff) or to act as a shop window for your brand/company. In the former case, I would ...


5

Well, that's exactly what UX is about - if prospect users are accustomed to acronyms, then the interface should use these; if they aren't, it shouldn't. You cannot argue for or against acronyms just because they are acronyms - it really depends on the target users. To give one example, consider the following photo: It was taken by the national ...


4

I think I tread the line between Ben and Daniel. I think that, if the domain is to be considered professional, then going with both the .com and the domain hack would be fine in my opinion. However, I can only go with that as long as the brand didn't rely on the "cute" domain. There's something to be said about the "web-savvy" vs the "not-so-web-savvy" ...


4

Create an app builder. Usually these are HTML5-based, but some of them are completely native. Then, with the app builder you create a separate, slightly customized app for each of the companies, which get accepted to the respective market / appstore separately. GOogle for app builder to see some examples. You can even automate the process if all it changes ...


4

I think it all comes down to "progressive enhancement". You are quite right that across Google domains it automatically begins to search....in modern browsers. But in older browsers, users still have to click search or hit enter. And so the 'I'm Feeling Lucky' button is left as a valid alternative option to retrieving search listings. For example, so many ...


4

I am on the "support everything" side. You see, many times a user wants support, he does not need a technical solution so much as he needs somebody to hold his hand and tell him that everything will be OK. Promising support is a factor in user satisfaction, even if people never happen to use it - they just feel better knowing that, if they need help, there ...


3

IMO, yes. Facebook, for better or worse has pretty much locked that 'word/action' up and any visitor coming is going to correlate 'like' with facebook. I would suggest "Thumbs Up" (old school) or an "approve". "Approve" is plain and simple and clearly understandable, yet somewhat steril in voice. If it is in relating to a service or product possibly ...


3

Firstly, just to restate, The homepage can be different as long as the 'feeling' of the brand is still the same. Couldn't agree more. In my opinion, the current homepage doesn't provide the same feeling. On the topic of design, your app might be flat, but you can still have skeuomorphic elements. Take spendee for example (http://www.spendeeapp.com) ...


3

Use Joyride, and a one time change. Let the user know things have changed a bit. Inform them the website has changed its look and feel, but assure them they are in the right place. Give them a guided tour of the new features, and how the site was modified. Incremental Changes would be annoying!


3

Tagline, strapline, make mantra - they all put a definition or a label on the service or product that people will use to talk about and share with others using the same words and terminology. They add a personality to the brand (so make sure you use a suitable font!) They engage at first sight. They help you remember the experience that bit extra. So, ...


3

This mainly regards corporate identity and should not affect usability very much - usually. However, I think you should not force people to write it with a star, as the ★ sign is extremely hard to enter for average user (in unicode it's 2605, so it needs pressing Alt+2605 according to this article). Instead, you should let them use "My Business" (or ...


2

If there are too many items using similar colours you're better off using a different labeling technique. If the chart is branded in the correct colours but everything looks the same the chart won't actually be readable so you negate the purpose of it existing. It's better to go off-brand for the colours and keep the chart readable than trying to crowbar in ...


2

Sounds like some user research is required, the only way you will find out for sure. Also consider new users, what knowledge do they come to the site with? Personally I don't see the problem with a tagline. If it is designed correctly and fits with the product/brand guidelines it can be of great help. It can give extra context to the product. You could ...


2

Why is the button near the search field? Because "I'm feeling lucky" still takes an argument from the main search field, so it needs to be grouped with it in order for that interaction to be understood. Why don't they pull it away and emphasise it? Because that would remove focus from the main field, or worse, have the user pulled in two directions ...


2

As far as alerting the user to their active role, it seems like that is something you would want to show them peripherally; I would look into using a different color for each role, and linking that color to the role selection tool. For example, the button to enter exhibitor mode could be orange, and while operating in exhibitor mode, the title bar background ...


2

I am designing a SaaS web app that sounds very similar. I have put my company's customer branding logo in the upper left, and my company's logo in the lower left in the footer. This way my customer's branding is prominently displayed for their end users, but down below there is a subtle reminder as to who is really powering this software. I think this is ...


2

Short answer, it depends on the company/product. It should be very clearly defined within the company what the scope of authorized support is. For instance if your company deals with components that require an internet connection, it's not necessarily your job to diagnose client's network problems. However you may wish to refer them to a reputable network ...


2

Most users will certainly want all their questions answered and all their problems resolved within a single chat session. So, if we are speaking about better user experience here, "anything & everything" is what users want. This is the approach we are undertaking in our own company and it works pretty well for us and for our clients. We have a ...


2

It's about authenticity. If you want your testimonial to look like it was actually written by (or spoken by) the user, do not include the star. People don't write or speak company logos, they say the company's name. I would never say "Fed[arrow]Ex delivered my package on time." Or "I got a great price on shampoo at Wal[star]Mart." The time to enforce ...


2

There have been cases of companies which have re-branded their names in local markets to reach out to new customers so that they can relate to the brand in the local language. To quote this article It is true that when the original brand names are short and simple, it is sometimes a good choice to keep them as is instead of translating them. ...


2

Branding in applications isn't really that important. As @Austin French said in the comment, you may use some details to show your brand, but still, it's not what matters. First of all - applications no longer looks the same as they did years ago (for example in windows there were blue title bars, gray embossed buttons and bars etc.). Now you can recognize ...


1

I've run into this line of thought myself. Off the top of my head, you could try a lot of things. Heart and favorite are a couple that I haven't seen others in here use, but are still used in popular sites (Tumblr and Twitter). There are so many of these sites that have similar messages, I think what you need to decide is what will your users best identify ...



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