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35

Sometimes things exist not because they still make sense, but because their presence is an affordance -- i.e. it works not because it's good, but because the visitor understands what it is, what it does, and how to use it, because they've been inculcated over years with this knowledge. The "I'm Feeling Lucky" button is a grand example of this, because as ...


19

Interestingly, the button costs google up to $110 million per year. In 2007, Google search boss Marissa Mayer estimated that 1% of all Google searches go through the I'm Feeling Lucky button – skipping Google's search results pages entirely. That meant that Google showed ZERO ads (and therefore got ZERO ad clicks) on 1% of all Google search queries. ...


12

There are several design reasons The colors are complementary - The four colors are roughly evenly spaced across the color wheel, which is a basic approach to creating complementary colors. Technically, this approach is called using a tetradic color palette. For more, you can read about color theory. Colorful palettes create a sense of openness, ...


11

Having the company tagline on the homepage is Jacob Neilson's guideline #1 for company homepages. It's also one of the most frequently broken guideline for the exact reasons you and other answers have stated. Even well-known companies presumably hope to attract new customers and should tell first-time visitors about the site's purpose. It is especially ...


11

When they first see the site in search results, on a billboard, or in text, I'd expect most to be more attracted to a website with a clear simple name like news.com However upon visiting the website for a few times, a more distinct and original name may provide better branding opportunities and so serve to attract repeated visits from users who don't have ...


10

Great question. From the viewpoint of an evil rhetorician, the short answer is "build a more convincing argument." You're already asking that, so it seems what you need is techniques to improve your argument and, in turn, your persuasiveness. I've found that one of the best ways to get buy-in is to get the client to come to your own decision without feeling ...


10

I guess they use these colors because they form the "4 unique hues". See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unique_hues I would not go so far as to attach a certain meaning to this. While colors do have a certain psychological meaning, there is no argument to assume that those are the reasons for their choice. It could be anything ranging from purely ...


8

After thinking about this question for the last couple months and reading some related literature (Stephen P. Anderson's Seductive Interaction Design in particular), I've decided that the continuing existence of the button is likely due to a combination of three factors: Branding - As @RachelKeslensky writes in her answer: keeping the button says "Yes, ...


8

In UI design we do see the use of red for warning, delete and errors commonly. But red is not always a color which tells people to keep away. Red can be effectively used to grab the user's attention. An example is how Google uses red for almost all the buttons they want the user to notice or take action. If you're going to use red for buttons on your ...


6

I think it all comes down to "progressive enhancement". You are quite right that across Google domains it automatically begins to search....in modern browsers. But in older browsers, users still have to click search or hit enter. And so the 'I'm Feeling Lucky' button is left as a valid alternative option to retrieving search listings. For example, so many ...


6

Short answer: Yes. What you are looking for is the mere-exposure effect. It's good for many things, like for getting a girlfriend! But let's stick to logos and brands for now ;-) In studies of interpersonal attraction, the more often a person is seen by someone, the more pleasing and likeable that person appears to be. Source It has to do with both ...


5

Up-vote/Down-vote are quite neutral (in terms of branding and word-association) and give you a good measure of support the post/person has.


5

I think the most important thing is your audience, and whether the name fits the content. I'll compare Huffington Post and Fark.com, not entirely comparable niches but good examples of different naming paradigms and audiences. Huffington Post sounds like a newspaper. They're trying to be a newspaper (less the paper). You see the name and it sounds like a ...


5

I would be wary of stereotyping your audience, particularly in terms of something as personal as colour choice! :) You haven't given the exact purpose of your start up, so I'm unclear as to whether the aim of the site is to provide an immediate service (e.g. you're selling stuff) or to act as a shop window for your brand/company. In the former case, I would ...


5

Well, that's exactly what UX is about - if prospect users are accustomed to acronyms, then the interface should use these; if they aren't, it shouldn't. You cannot argue for or against acronyms just because they are acronyms - it really depends on the target users. To give one example, consider the following photo: It was taken by the national ...


4

I think I tread the line between Ben and Daniel. I think that, if the domain is to be considered professional, then going with both the .com and the domain hack would be fine in my opinion. However, I can only go with that as long as the brand didn't rely on the "cute" domain. There's something to be said about the "web-savvy" vs the "not-so-web-savvy" ...


4

Create an app builder. Usually these are HTML5-based, but some of them are completely native. Then, with the app builder you create a separate, slightly customized app for each of the companies, which get accepted to the respective market / appstore separately. GOogle for app builder to see some examples. You can even automate the process if all it changes ...


4

I am on the "support everything" side. You see, many times a user wants support, he does not need a technical solution so much as he needs somebody to hold his hand and tell him that everything will be OK. Promising support is a factor in user satisfaction, even if people never happen to use it - they just feel better knowing that, if they need help, there ...


3

IMO, yes. Facebook, for better or worse has pretty much locked that 'word/action' up and any visitor coming is going to correlate 'like' with facebook. I would suggest "Thumbs Up" (old school) or an "approve". "Approve" is plain and simple and clearly understandable, yet somewhat steril in voice. If it is in relating to a service or product possibly ...


3

Firstly, just to restate, The homepage can be different as long as the 'feeling' of the brand is still the same. Couldn't agree more. In my opinion, the current homepage doesn't provide the same feeling. On the topic of design, your app might be flat, but you can still have skeuomorphic elements. Take spendee for example (http://www.spendeeapp.com) ...


3

Use Joyride, and a one time change. Let the user know things have changed a bit. Inform them the website has changed its look and feel, but assure them they are in the right place. Give them a guided tour of the new features, and how the site was modified. Incremental Changes would be annoying!


3

Tagline, strapline, make mantra - they all put a definition or a label on the service or product that people will use to talk about and share with others using the same words and terminology. They add a personality to the brand (so make sure you use a suitable font!) They engage at first sight. They help you remember the experience that bit extra. So, ...


3

This mainly regards corporate identity and should not affect usability very much - usually. However, I think you should not force people to write it with a star, as the ★ sign is extremely hard to enter for average user (in unicode it's 2605, so it needs pressing Alt+2605 according to this article). Instead, you should let them use "My Business" (or ...


3

Branding in applications isn't really that important. As @Austin French said in the comment, you may use some details to show your brand, but still, it's not what matters. First of all - applications no longer looks the same as they did years ago (for example in windows there were blue title bars, gray embossed buttons and bars etc.). Now you can recognize ...


3

Here is an arbitrary assortment of logos for product groups: Each group have some company-wide characteristics: fonts shapes colors overlay or base parts of the icon But everybody chooses their own way. Copyring for the images is held by their respective owners - taken from: http://office.microsoft.com/en-gb/products/?CTT=97 ...


3

There is no benefit to the customer here. This is 99% likely the result of someone from corporate insisting on throwing more trademarks in to the product because, well, we have the trademarks so use them dummy! From what I can google, ©yummm®™ is super vague, unrelated to tipping or money in general, just a sort of tagline that isn't even present on their ...


3

A big consideration in naming a new user feature is considering real life idioms/metaphors that will relate to the feature. Interface metaphors, such as the classic desktop metaphor common in graphical user interfaces (GUIs), leverage users’ existing knowledge of a specific domain to enhance the learnability of its software. ...


3

I think you should carefully measure the extent of your UI, including elements, reaction of those elements to user interaction, usability in general, goals of your app, and so on. One thing that strikes me from your description is this part: It is possible to use this color for links and main buttons, like "Ok", "Sand", "Submit"(CTA buttons)? It's ...


3

I think you can check mailchimp's example. When you completed your email campaign on their platform, their brand character chimp will shows up and give you a high-five. I don't remember if the chimp actually do a high-five(raise his hand) or its the whole image just pops-up. You might want to run a quick test if those character does means something for your ...


3

If we are discussing this from the perspective of doing the brand mascot I would tackle it as a two-fold process: 1. Mascot design, which will involve the character design process You will need to start with formalizing the brand characteristics that have to be infused into the mascot. This will also help with the animation. This can be handled with ...



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