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13

The use of the progress bar pattern is helpful if a user would benefit from knowing where they are in a multi-step process. As you noted, it should not be styled to look like links if it is not clickable. Here's an example from the Yahoo Design Pattern Library:


6

Find below some suggestions you may try : Use horizontal axis for time, much easier to read. Use grey font for hours. They are the less important information on the screen. Use less saturated colors for rooms. Saturated colors create more clutter. Do not repeat the hours in the room bars. They are not necessary. Display continuous bars. If two sessions in ...


5

Think about what influences a passenger's decision process when they book a seat. Which factors influence their choice? Window seat Isle seat Emergency exit Space for wheelchair Proximity to toilet Proximity to travel partners Etc ... Personally unless one of these factors is relevant, I don't care where I sit - so having the seat chosen for me would ...


5

Seat selection on mobile devices needs to fulfill several conditions: Key physical features of the vehicle, such as entrances/exits and the loo (if any) need to be clearly marked. All active areas must be large enough to be "pressed" easily. If the content doesn't fit the screen comfortably, there must be an indicator that more is available in some ...


4

Things that come to mind for a travel booking website is that most people come there with unrefined questions and don't want to complete a full booking on the first attempt. They need to check it with other people, or find out if they can actually have those dates from work, etc. For the unrefined questions, one thing is the fuzzy logic mentioned by ...


3

Here's my suggestion: Show only 1/2 the amount of seats the bus can cater. This way, the user will have a bigger 'seat' button to click on. Users can scroll up/down to view the seats. Have the legend displayed out of the seats screen; however do have it shown always at the top/bottom of the screen. Provide some indicators where the features of the bus are. ...


3

I want the same user experience that I'd get from a knowledgable real-live seasoned traveller working at a high street travel agent. I want to be able to enter my details once. Exactly once. Not more than once. Not even twice. Just Once. I want to progressively give more information to narrow my choices, but I never want to feel that I might be losing out ...


3

IMO, a wizard flow should bring up a new modal task. The task can either be completed or canceled. The "tab bar" at the bottom is a distraction for the task of booking, and should be removed. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


3

This practice is common in checkout processes, as it isolates the vital information at hand and encourages the user to focus on the action needed. It also helps keep the process linear and avoid confusion as to what action needs to be taken next. I believe in a waiting room metaphor, this makes just as much sense. some interesting reading: Smashing ...


3

Ecommerce websites use stocking information like 'only 5 left' to coerce visitors into buying the item. Visitors will be afraid they'll lose the deal if they go in search of a cheaper alternative. It's what we call a dark ux pattern. In case of booking.com I think there are two reasons for adding it. It coerces visitors into booking, because it makes ...


2

If you're still at the research phase, consider including in your web convention survey http://seatguru.com by Tripdvisor. Users can search for a flight> when the flight appears in results, the plane is presented in an illustrated top level view> users then mouse over (impractical for iPad) seats for specific information about that particular seat. Info ...


2

Instead of viewing the week in the columns, you could show the conference rooms in the columns. Then you can move the day of the week as a dropdown. I would think that most people are trying to schedule a meeting for a particular day and they can select the day, then see which times have room openings. That would de-clutter your chart.


1

To directly answer your question, it is better to have the date selector on both the details page and the booking page. There is more than one way to skin a cat and the same holds true for performing tasks in many web and desktop applications. Think about all the ways that you make changes in a word processing app - dropdown menus, keyboard shortcuts, ...


1

If it was a smaller page designed for the booking process rather than a big electronic board I'd recommend just displaying one day at a time, with a dropdown to swap between them. But since this is designed to give an overview, my recommendation would be something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The ...


1

I don't think this works well. There are more hour slots than there are days in the week, and the content in a typical slot tends to be wider than it is tall (since it is usually text). When you combine these facts, it means that the information fits better in the traditional arrangement of columns representing days and rows timeslots. Your design also ...


1

I think it's useful to inform your (new) customers that the booking could be sold out soon. (Probably it isn't, but it is what they want the clients to think.) In my point of view it's a nice way to push users in the sales funnel, only when it's not too obvious.


1

Personally I like the app-wide tab bar at the bottom, so here's how I'd changes things while keeping it always visible. First, when starting a booking operation, I'd dim the bottom row entirely and then highlight booking slightly. This provides a little extra feedback that they're in the process of booking, while also letting the user know that the other ...


1

My simple advice would be to move or even remove the cancel button. In it's current state the user will click cancel instead of previous in some cases and one cannot rely on colour differences to help solve this. You could put the cancel link in a consitent place on all screens and make this consistent with other application canel operations. You could ...


1

In my opinion (full disclosure: I'm responsible for the UX of some touristic portals) the most important aspect is consistency. On our sites the user can see the prices before entering any date, in this scenario the most meaningful choice is to show prices per night (per person), because they are easier to compare. Hence even after the user entered her ...


1

Personally, I find a long series of wizard like windows wearisome. But it depends on the application and my expectations. A casual, once-in-a-while user who has a significant number of alternatives may get frustrated by the 4th or 5th step and exit the process. A frequent user or a user who is accustomed to such wizards in their industry would be far more ...



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