Hot answers tagged

6

One of the main advantages for requiring the user to enter in their email address when commenting is actually for the site administrator. There may be instances where your comment prompts a response not suited to, or too large for the comments section, and as such they will contact you directly. It also acts as an extra barrier (although not a very good ...


6

You'd have to ask the designers and developers of SO for the definitive answer. My guesses: the overall framework of this site isn't terribly new. It was built prior to the era of responsive web design. I think we could safely assume a future redesign may accommodate that. while full-screen can be great for reading code, it's terrible for reading text. ...


4

You'll notice that the Wall Street Journal provides a Search utility in addition to tags and most popular content. They are providing multiple methods for users to find content. For dynamic content sites, the only navigation design that could possibly hope to hold up over time is a combination of search, index by date, tags and most-popular pages, which is ...


4

One typical pattern is a side panel, which contains recent or related posts. Even if a user hadn't read the whole article (because of some reasons), he still could see and go to other articles. It isn't possible if such panel is below the article. Take a look at some examples: .


3

People (users) like to organize and categorize things in their surrounding. We like to build our own understanding of the world in chunks of information, as if we need to know how the world is. Some categorize things or information by color, others by shape, scent, sound, surfacing, shining or look. As we do this categorizing of things or information we ...


3

I've read a lot on this in the past and, across numerous websites have tinkered between categories vs tags somewhat. I haven't really seen a study as such that drills down into the UX and visitor behaviour surrounding categories and tags but this piece is pretty good on the subject. There is a great amount of web content on the subject, some of which is ...


3

My understanding of this is that the original uppermost content becomes the anchor of the interaction. Everything below it is a reply. To reply to a reply, you'd need to set that as an anchor (in many UX cases). Tweets in reply, for example, unfold the whole conversation in this manner with a "More" option if there's more than X-number of Tweets threaded. ...


3

You think there is one person, but there's not. There's two. At the very least, it's you and the reader. Or, you and the customer. Our service is not your service -- it belongs to the customer as well. You want to get across that they are part of the business, too. After all, a business without customers isn't actually a business. In my mind, using the ...


3

This is not new, they just named the "tag" and "category" differently. For example, Amazon.com, "department" is actually "category," while the filters at the left side of the search result page are the "tags." Instead of making the two panels horizontal, you should make them vertical, because they are lists. Since you can only choose 1 category, you should ...


3

Well, if your users need to know markdown anyway, and there's a live / dynamic preview, you might be able to get away with having the default text for a new post include the markdown for the title. So, for example, someone clicks the "new post" button and the file they get has this: # Type your post's title here (but keep the #!) Just start typing your ...


2

My web comic doesn't have login accounts -- it's more secure for my site as a one-person operation and it reduces barriers to getting people to comment. Asking for an email address serves two purposes: It allows me to pull up the associated Gravatar with that account, giving the user some degree of identity. Because the email address is not shared on the ...


2

Option two would be the best, in order to get relevant comments as the user will be required to read the entire article. On the feed, could you not have a comment count (Similar to hckrnews)? this will then indicate to the user that article has comments and thus may encourage them to drill down into the article.


2

Good question. First each user have different perspectives. In most of the technical blogs comments are as equally important as the blog itself.It is not the same case that all the users dislike the long page functionality that has the entire comments. May be there are some just like you. If you just want to show the exact page length to the user and not ...


2

Probably what you are looking for is someone who can help you to understand what you really need. Looks like everyone around you is screaming buzzwords like UX, Design and all that stuff, and you want to keep your blogs trendy and don't know were to start. If you want to really understand the process that goes behind creating a great user experience, I ...


2

Posted dates matter. It drives me up the wall to visit a site and they've removed the dates. I understand why they are removed. I want to make sure what I'm reading is relevant and not outdated.


2

It depends. Do you have a lot of content in the side bar? Is the list above/below the fold? And most of all: does it work now? There isn't a general rule where to put recent/top posts. If you're providing the posts strictly for SEO purposes, then you should be careful with footer links. If it's strictly for the users, you can't generally say that links ...


2

There are 2 different cases: 1. You have a page with multiple blog post excerpts: Solution: You can only use a raised button or a flat button 2. You only have one blog post on the page that's shortened If it's the main action on the page, you can safely use a floating action button Reference: ...


2

More important than typeface, size and style is the use of whitespace. You need to make sure that your readers knows that this text belongs to the image as a caption. You could try with 2em between the image, it's narrow caption and the surrounding text, and see if the effect of the caption belongs to the image or not. From what I've seen, captions are ...


2

Reading text requires your eyes to jump from line end to next line start. If the text column is too wide, it gets difficult to keep the line. I don't have online citations about studies or textbooks, but googling "easy read layout" already turns up recommendations to not exceed 100 chars (webdesignfromscratch.com). Newspapers use less for easier reading. ...


1

I did some research on this a few years ago. Here's a summary of the conclusions: The advantage of using excerpts is that the home page of the blog reveals more posts. The page can be scanned easily and there's a higher chance that a visitor will find something he/she likes. Also, the visitor can easily locate a specific post if he came looking for one. ...


1

Depending on the blog there are a few possibles: It's the default setup in whatever blog software they're using and they just left it that way Whoever set up the blog prefers it that way They're catering to a group of users who visit the home page to catch up with several posts at the same time - so having the full posts makes for a simpler reading ...


1

Statistic varies from blog to blog. I'll state some of my past experience, but the statistics I have will not bring too much information. Showing a widget with likes -the like of Facebook Facepile will show that are actually people interested (like) this blog/content and it will appear more alive and trustworthy in the eyes of the user. Share buttons ...


1

It depends of the content, for example the travel blog, imagine that you are looking for comments and reviews for your next trip, what will be more useful? the last month review or the post 1 year old, sometimes dates are irrelevant, for example if you write a review of a book the post will be valid until a new version go out (long period of time) For ...


1

Thanks to all for your answers, all of them have made me think and create my own solution. Basically I create a Homescreen with only one post, where you can navigate via clicking or using the keys (this option needs to be notify to the user soon) and AJAX added. But inside of categories or search results I show 10 results (as it was before). I think with ...


1

In the simplest terms, keep your global navigation and make any sub-navigation below the global or at the side.


1

For consistency purpose, it's good to have a global navigation across the entire site. Blog often has its own type of navigation (e.g. post categories) and they can be presented as a sub-navigation menu (usually displayed in the sidebar or below a global nav bar). Some sites do have different navigation (or page layout) compare to the rest of the site and ...


1

I can't think of a single UX source that encourages a changing (or disappearing) primary/utility navigation. As such, seems to me fairly obvious (for the reasons you have mentioned and more) that you would wish to keep the site identity, navigation, and header/footer on each and every page. The only exception to this would be when a site is so big (say 8000 ...


1

Everyone here has already mentioned limiting the number of comments. As an alternative, you could opt for a reading position indicator. What I mean by that: Notice the red bar at the top. It indicates how much of the article you've read so far. A variation on this could be, just showing how high each part (article and comments) is relative to each ...


1

I'm fond of websites that don't load the comments initially, so the page size is an accurate portrayal of the article length. You can then either load the rest of the comments automatically when the user scrolls to the end of the article, or have a button they can click. This will also help with load times on sites with heavy comments.


1

Comments tend to be important for users who visit blogs/news/reviews sites, so dedicating a lot of real estate to comments is good design for these sites, maybe not aesthetically in your view but definitely in terms of meeting the user's goals.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible