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4

It depends: where do you expect the application to be used? If most users will be in a relatively quiet, indoor environment, the conference room should be close enough, in my opinion--even if it's not exactly the same (at home vs. work, for example). However, if the expected environment of use is quite different, testing in a conference room won't be ...


4

If at all possible I'd try and observe actual behaviour, rather than ask a question. Because people suck at predicting their own behaviour. For example run a remote usability test with mocked up a google search result around your topic with a mix of .co.uk & .com (or whatever) company names/URLs and see which is clicked most. You also have to remember ...


3

Combine two research methods Start with usability testing, for the reasons that @Kit-Grose gave. Have a quick glance at the illustration in this NN/g post about UX-research methods to understand which methods can give you insights into user performance, and which methods can survey their opinions and ratings. Then follow that research with a method that ...


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Aside from what is on that list, when I conduct usability tests I: Try to ensure that I give identical instructions to each participant. When people are doing tests remotely, it's easier to do this as you can provide written instructions. In person, however, I try extra hard to avoid going "off-script" and potentially leading anyone towards answers I ...


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The problem with this kind of issue is that I suspect you would get different answers from different parts of the globe. I suspect (and this is just a suspicion - I have no evidence for this) that populations with US trade interests may favor the .com suffix as it is considered a larger 'global' entity rather than just confined to their country whereas ...


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“All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players” I have conducted usability testing in a number of environments both controlled and uncontrolled and I genuinely believe that there is no silver bullet to deal with bias, but you do have to take precautions and consider impact on test results. Erving Goffman who was a very influential ...


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You shouldn't really expect to get explicit feedback from a usability test (honest or otherwise); that's what focus groups and other such things are for. Usability testing is a way to test outcomes, not opinions. It's a great way to see if the changes have a noticeable improvement (or at least equivalence) when it comes to users performing a given set of ...


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If it's possible to ask context-based questions, ask this: Thanks for participating in our survey. Please pick which of the two sites you'd like to help us evaluate: [www.website.com] [www.website.co.uk] And adjust the second link to be whatever the local domain extension is. Ideally you'd randomize the position of both links too, because some ...


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Have a look at 'Study: How Searchers Perceive Country Code Top-Level Domains' on Moz.com. Author Eli Schwartz presents some successful approaches to really get at 1. whether users are aware of general TLDs, 2. do users see a particular TLD (.edu specifically) as more trustworthy, 3. can users identify a particular location by the ccTLD used, and 4. can users ...


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I came across an issue with meta programming in one early test I did. I was asking the following question: A form on a web page needs to have a way of clearing or submitting the data – traditionally this is handled with two buttons. One says ‘Cancel’ and the other says ‘Submit’. Of the two buttons, One is on the left and the other on the right. Which ...



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