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18

I have found a study on this topic, quite long actually: Matzat Snijders vdHorst accepted version And also have a Luke Wrobleski 'seminar' on this topic http://videos.visitmix.com/MIX09/C17F - and he has wrote about web form design as well And one more on scribd Rethinking-The-Progress-Bar - "This paper explores the impact of various progress bar ...


8

The ui control or pattern for this is Completeness Meter (See the ui pattern for this). It's sometimes called a Progress Bar, but that term also has a much more generic use - such as in the case of a download percentage, and less specific to the sort of profile completeness you are talking about. The underlying concept is that of Gradual Engagement. The ...


5

I don't have any hard evidence or numbers on how progress bars affect abandonment rates. But I can give my experience on the subject. I worked on a website that had a 15-20 minute long insurance application. That site was my responsibility for about 6 years, and I saw it go through a lot of changes. We had a progress bar ever since the beginning though. ...


5

What to offer in a trial/evaluation version, how long and to whom is mainly a business decision. You'll have to take into account the whole sales process, and choose the methods that will help you reach your business goals, with satisfied customers. There are companies where you can only get into a free trial when giving all the info you'd normally give for ...


4

Take a look at this fantastic animation about the difference between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation:


2

I'm a big believer in the Connect with Fans + Reason to Buy business model from Techdirt. This means getting as many people to use your stuff for free and then finding innovative ways of getting the ones who are interested to pay for it. There are a lot of studies on that website about the business model. Thus any hold ups to people getting your software ...


1

The price that is current wether it is a regular or reduced price is always the most important. That is what the user will pay. The regular pricing allows the user to know this may be a time limited sale, permanent discount or getting ready for clearance or to be discontinued as well as showing them how much of a discount they are getting. You should always ...


1

I think it depends on if your price is already competitive. They may find a competing ad and determine you're still the best price and come back to your site without a promo. On the other hand, the opposite can happen. Know your competitive landscape.


1

from personal experience that's really annoying to see there is a place for a coupon, because most of the time you don't have it which makes you think: ok, where the hell am I supposed to get a coupon from? and that you google and don't find anything and it all leads to more frustration my point is coupons work only for coupon junkies who are constantly ...


1

If you haven't already, you should read Clay Shirky's book on crowdsourcing, Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations. As everyone here is obviously a fan of Stack Exchange, it's worth noting that its creator, Jeff Atwood, often points to Shirky as a source of inspiration. Wired recently published an article by Dan Ariely, How ...


1

I could answer for myself and I have to say for me it's the reputation system as others have mentioned. I have never been interested in creating content because the reward of posting something helpful to anonymous strangers such as yourselves :) never really appealed to me as I got nothing back in return or if I did, it was in the context of a comment in a ...


1

Humans are ultimately pack animals. We crave interacting with a pack, helping others and receiving recognition for what we do. Although monetary rewards certainly work, when I think of the endless people hours that went into writing and editing Wikipedia for free, it seems obvious that money is not the only, or even the greatest motivating factor. ...


1

Jono Bacon, former community manager of the Ubuntu (Linux) operating system wrote a good e-book on managing communities called The Art of Community. It's good for the nuts and bolts on managing open source projects.


1

I had a client who came to me, worried that the whole 'user experience' of their software was causing a low conversion rate from evaluation licence to paid license. As it turns out after an in-depth analysis of their product, their concern was well founded. But here's my point: The only way that the client got on to this idea was because they had a 30 day ...


1

This is a form of gamification, too. As users will want to reach 100% completion, like in a game, they will strive to complete their set tasks. Especially if there is some form of reward at the end of the 100%. http://www.dropbox.com do this especially well where they reward their users with extra storage if they complete set tasks and get to 100% ...



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