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9

I'll just quickly point out three points: It'll look less clean. I mean this both figuratively and literally. Anytime you add more visual information to something it becomes more cluttered. This is why with very data-dense interfaces people often choose for flat design; it alleviates the business a bit. Secondly, some patterns can actually make it look as ...


3

You're probably not going to find data on this, because it's not the kind of things that publishable studies are usually focused on. If you're really lucky, some hyper-productive UXer will have turned some test data into blog post, but even then, the sample size will probably be small. This is a case where you have to make decisions based on the ...


2

You could have a set of icons that represent when the elements would appear. Icons that represent device or screen size. Example Or instead of icons, numbers that represent the break points at which they appear/disappear.


2

The only benefit of choosing a white background over a light grey background is that it arguably gives you a broader range of text colours that you can use, and still remain within accepted usability and accessibility guidelines. In other words, if you want to use blue text you would be able to use a slightly lighter shade of blue on a white background, ...


1

I think it doesn't really matter for the healthy users as long as the content is easily readable. However, you should consider testing the contrast for the color blind and visually impaired users. A way to do it is to use the NoCoffee Chrome extension which can simulate a lot of vision impairments. You need to test the Low Contrast Sensitivity.


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Terms that could be applicable: noise (the specific tool often used in photoshop) textured background (more generic term, but most graphic designers would know what you are referring to. Alternatively: subtle texture grainy (a term that comes from 'film grain')


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I use the "light noise background". But I think this term might be too technical for clients and non-designer/non-frontend colleagues. I'm not sure there is a common, standardized term for it right now. Not in the way we had it with the "brushed metal texture" or "skeumorphic trend".


1

It's generally known as "[type] mask" where type could be noise, blur, vibrancy, etc. See vibrancy and blur techniques for iOS8 that applies to your scenario, background techniques for iOS7 and Masks in UIVisualEffectView documentation by Apple Please note that I'm taking your SO question as guidance and hwo to make this programatically. If you mean in ...



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