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0

It depends...there are factors like how much of the string you will end up highlighting. If your results are long and you've only typed a couple of characters, then by highlighting everything, you highlight nothing. Use option 1 when the text the user is searching for may appear anywhere as a substring, so that the user can identify where the match is ...


0

I would say combine both option 2 and 3. Give a dropdown of department list to a user and keep "create new department"/ "dont see your department"/"not finding department"/"other" as last option. Since department list will be more, its better to have a button near to the drop down as suggested in prev comment. Once User clicks on that, you can show text ...


0

The problem is not with the autocomplete field, but with the creation of departments. Right now, registering a new department and picking one from a list take about the same amount of effort. To minimize double-listed departments, it should be considerably easier to find one than to register one. There are two ways to do achieve this. A: make the finding ...


2

Autocomplete functionality is great for advanced users who don't look at the keyboard whilst typing, however lots of users need to look at the keyboard. This can cause them to not even notice the autocomplete suggestions, this type then hit tab or return. A UX pattern of search then select for a list (ideally not a <select> one) with a "don't see your ...


3

I come across this all the time, so I have a prepared answer for this. We are not building solutions for the benefit of the developers - we are building them for the benefit of the users. Making something easy to use is rarely easy to do. So if you want an easy, usable solution, it might be difficult to do. Option 1 - difficult for the team to build and ...


2

How about two radio buttons with the default being "current store"? [o] Search current store (188) [ ] Search a different store [___] And when searching the current store yields no results, you could flip the radio button to the second option and display a message: No results found in current store. Would you like to try a different store? [ ] ...


1

One design standard to keep in mind is that applications should communicate with the user in the language that the user understands, not in the language used directly by CRUD operations. In this example, store ID 188 means nothing to a user, but the system knows exactly what that means. I would suggest a prompt similar to what @PixelSnader explained, except ...


1

You can sidestep the issue in this case by leaving the number blank, and adding text to the right or under it saying 'if left blank we will search store 188'.



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