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18

Firstly, don't auto-highlight the first option like shown in the screen cap. Then dim down the auto-suggest area when the user is just typing. If they hit the down arrow or hover over the auto-correct area, it will brighten back up to its current state. Some text could be added to give the users some instructions, but I don't think they'd be needed.


18

Generally typeahead/autocomplete is instant, and to avoid confusion I'd recommend sticking with the standard of autocompleting instantly after a single character. For no reason other than convention I'd suggest keeping an instant, one character autocomplete; every search bar I have within reach acts this way, including Google.com, Google Chrome, iTunes, ...


16

Don't complete on enter, this will make people crazy if they want to search for shorter strings! What you could do is showing them if their string will produce any results on-the-fly Many websites check your chosen username for availability while you type it. Edit: You can supply some selection and then allow to select it with enter, but never ...


14

The problem isn't with your autocomplete control, it's with your form. Check out how Trello does this. 1. Before you begin, the input field explains what you can enter Note that the form is titled "Add Members" and allows you to input multiple email addresses and select multiple people in the list. 2. When you begin typing, "searching..." appears to ...


11

Perhaps a hybrid approach would make sense. What I'm thinking would be to link the delay to the number of characters already entered, with a longer delay for fewer characters. If a user has only typed 'K', they're probably going to type a lot more, so an instant suggestion would return more results (less likely to have their target at the top), risk more ...


11

If selection is made exclusively from the list, you could auto-select first item. Then Enter will pick this item if user have not changed selection.


10

I think the answer depends on how your widget and search works: In case you can search for partial results, you shouldn't automatically autocomplete the field, as the user might just wanted to search for the substring he entered (in the above case he wanted everything starting with AB). For this you probably have a combobox style widget, where you can ...


9

If you are providing an autocomplete field, you are helping your users find information in a long list quickly. Pagination of results obviously doesn't improve the UX because flipping through pages isn't much different from scrolling a regular drop-down list. Therefore, simply don't display any results until there are no more than 10 left (the number may be ...


7

Because you have a bunch of fields in rows, each doing the same thing (from what I can see from your screen grabs), you will want to handle this with an introductory message. Something along the lines of: All fields below are optional. You may skip this step by taking the [add your action here] Another takeaway for you, it wouldn’t be clear to me that the ...


7

Typing on the phone is much more difficult than on the keyboard, so people make more mistakes and the phone autocorrect has to work much harder. Keyboard mistakes come from actual grammar mistakes and from typos, which are usually caused by typing an adjacent key by mistake - in most cases the wrong key is the one immediately to the right or to the left of ...


5

I'd rather stick with the well know format since users tend to go to "auto-pilot" in this mode, so making them think isn't recommended. It has also happened to me before that I'm typing / choosing faster then the values are auto-update, creating confusion and sometimes input of double values. Moreover, you've mentioned it's an international site, so that ...


5

It's best if the autocompletion alternatives shows up very quickly, then you don't need an icon. The user will not recongnise the icon for autocompletion anyway. If there is no matches you could change the text to red color and maybe show a message at the side (or on the drop down list, where the alternatives should be shown). When the user deletes a ...


5

First of all, user should know what is the state of a system. She used the feature, entered the data and now she expects to know the results. In such context, there is a value in showing the '0 results' information. Next thing is to know what would user like to do when she gets no search results? Did she misspelled the name? Can she take another route of ...


5

This possibly sounds like a good use case for categorised autocomplete - http://jqueryui.com/autocomplete/#categories A single search box that splits the result into logical grouping when presented back to the user. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Hope this helps.


5

You can implement it like the tags work in stackexchange sites. Start to type in the tags field and do a search on every character. In this example, I typed fin. I see a list of tags (companies in your case) which I can select. Or i continue to type and create a new tag (company) if there are no matches made.


4

If you are simply showing the autocomplete suggestions below the search box, it is likely that some people may confuse them for the search results which appear in very much the same place. To make this clearer, you could add a line that says "popular search terms" or "suggested terms" above the suggested search terms. This will reduce the number of people ...


4

I would take a leaf out of the Hipmunk android mobile app for finding flights (and hotels). Pictures below are taken from the video on the Android Market page for this app. On the initial screen is a box for departure and destination points. You tap the box and a screen appears where you can start typing the name. A few recent selections may appear ...


4

Show a downward arrow in the box that implies it's a drop-down. Then, perhaps, supplement it with some small help text. That's how Atlassian JIRA solves the problem and it works quite well:


4

In the Google world it stops displaying anything in the dropdown and displays some best guesses below. So it displays a dropdown up until thereshouldbeno: But then gives up after that and displays a best guess below:


4

If you automatically change some text input, the user may not notice that it has been changed. That will lead to a mismatch between what they expect and what happens. I can see two possible solutions to this: Only allow the value to be changed with the slider, and make the input field a read only field. This is the simplest to do, and I believe the ...


4

As frequently happens, it depends. In this case it depends on the application type. If it's a UI that the users will use frequently, as at work, then typing a few characters is both faster and safer that choosing with the mouse. For this kind of applications I've set (sort of) autocomplete inputs, combined with drop-down, that were very successful in that ...


4

Are users supposed to know client IDs and names? If it is so I would suggest to use an autocomplete (Google like) displaying results at the bottom of the search box. You could also provide a checkbox to select "search by name" or "search by ID".


4

The last option, using a single field for type and street is likely the best. That said, let's go through the three options and see where the strengths/weaknesses of each are: The "street" field starts focused; if the user selects something in the drop down then the "street number" is focused ("type" is autofilled); if he tries to move to the next ...


4

These is a different between Auto-complete and Auto-suggest. Auto-complete happens within the input box where you type and you can press either enter or "right-arrow-key" to accept it. Auto-Suggest list appears as a multiple suggestion list in the form of drop-down. To make use of auto-suggest items, you have to click "down-arrow-key" or mouse click to ...


4

I would suggest a few things: First, if search is a major part of the workflow, then do not stick it in the corner. Make it at the top of the screen, very prominent. Either in the middle, or if it's stuck in a corner, then make it stick out by letting it overflow the header area or whatever. Second, put some text in the box before a search is performed, ...


4

It should not. The user counts on you that you do not change his input behind his back. As the user continue to the next field, his focus is now on that only field. Though the fields may be visually close to each other, he might not pay attention that you've changed his previous input. Not to mention that you got it right saying it might annoy him even if ...


4

My idea is to present the information about minimum characters required in the autosuggest/autocomplete box. Like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups (the "X characters to go" should only appear after a second of waiting with less that 5 characters typed into the inupt)


3

Have a look at Chosen by Harvest, there is a good combination of autocomplete and select box that you might consider using. It is suitable for both "familiarity" situations. If the options are not familiar, there's a list from which to select. If you know what you want, there's an autocomplete that you can use.



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