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The old - attention grabber Of all low-level visual 'features' (colour, size, etc.) that our brain processes, motion (ie, animation) is the most attention grabbing one. See this quote from chapter 2 (What we can easily see) of Visual Thinking for Design, Ware 2008: The web designer now has the ability to create web pages that crawl, jiggle, and flash. ...


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I like to use animation to communicate where things are located. For example on page load show the navigation open but then animate the minimize feature so the user knows where to find the nav when they need it.


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- Hey Office, just follow me!! + Sure, sir. Yes, the right answer is following. The cursor is not lagging or something. It's just following you while you write or move. By following, Microsoft is flattering you. Because everyone likes to being followed by something/someone.


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Yes, it is manipulative (in the same sense that a baby's cry is manipulative, car commercials are manipulative and butterfly's wing patterns that look like eyes are manipulative). And yes, these practices are usually ethical - as long as you are not selling something illegal, promoting credit cards to poor people, lying about the product qualities, that ...


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Using design psychology to influence your user-base, is perfectly fine (ethics don't apply). I don't think however that what you want to happen and what will be perceived by the end user are in line with one another. With your specific question I could see the following effects taking place, as an end-user: I'm somewhat confused by some random thing ...


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The call to action should be well-designed enough to stand out alone without animation. Place the button in a universally accepted area where the user will expect to find it. Adding animation often looks like a cheap trick and user's won't appreciate it especially if they are engaged in your site and then their focus and attention is taken away because of ...



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