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If the default is to show the contextual help and then you give the user the option to turn the help off then the first option "put this settings in the navigation drawer, with a simple on/off switch" should work very well. The user was aware that there was contextual help and turned it off. If you want to go one extra step, after the user selects "turn off ...


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I wouldn't create an entire Settings-view, just for a single Switch. Also, placing it in the navigation drawer is a strange place to put it (atleast, I've never seen it before). If it is possible for your app, and it is clear enough for your users, you could consider placing the Switch in the Actionbar.


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I like Facebook's pattern: Mine would probably be to just change the text from Like to On. See a more complete answer here.


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There is no such pattern in Android, but, Android allows you to modify existing UI-elements. Check out this article. You would have to create 2 "button/togglebutton-combination" where it's clear whether it's selected or not. It's the same as the article I referenced to, except your images would be different :)


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I guess as per the new material design guidelines, they even some dimensions about the same. I hope you were looking for the same.


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Interesting question. If your user expects to perform more than one action on the filter box then auto closing should be avoided. Here is a related article in Smashing Magazine. Although the screenshots they have provided are somewhat dated, I would suggest the filter drawer as a concept. On closing of such a drawer data can refresh according to new filter ...


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This answer assumes you want an on/off switch to toggle the state of the AC. Sorry if i miss-interpreted the question. I'd recommend the use of an on/off label as this is controlling its running state rather than a setting among many, like 'Silent mode' or similar for your AC. You can localize the label if needed rather than using I|O label. Check the ...


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As of 2015, there's a de facto document on best design practices for Android: Material Design There's a bit of UX fail in the documentation which they start by introducing cool new stuff like materials and cards, but doesn't start with the basics like layouts and grids. So you might have to flip from the back. Much of it involves feedback. Animations ...


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While the guidelines don't state anything about reverting the state of a Floating Action Menu triggered by a Floating Action Button, two patterns have become prominent in this use case, and rightly so: The Floating Action Menu in Inbox fades in a translucent white overlay over the rest of the content, drawing focus towards the menu. While the rest of the ...


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In this case, the intention to add a contact has already been signalled, and the next logical step would be entering text. I feel the 'stock' approach is best here, have the name field focussed, and the keyboard should be opened up. As Mahijeet says, it is obvious that the user will fill in information.


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Using a text button in ActionBar is fine if it's only one button. It even makes more sense than an icon. A right sided text "DONE" button in actionBar is very common and makes sense. But if you have more than one (or two) button in the actionBar, I'd advise to stick with the icons.


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First of all, Yes, it is the "default" (and kind of annoying) behaviour of Android. In your situation, if you click like/dislike 50 times, the Toasts will stack and will continue to show even if the user closes the application (as they are asynchronous). The best and simplest approach would be to never stack toasts, unless the new toast is a very important ...


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Yes it can While the Material Design guidelines don't specify how morphing items are reversed: There are implemented examples of reversing animations. For example, this demo shows a reversible menu button which could be used in a floating button or fixed navbar. Reversible interactions which comport with Material Design physics. A morphing button might ...


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Minimise solving this through UX If this app is going out to users, it's not a good idea to have anything in the code base that points to your local machine or a test machine. I would suggest that: Add an invisible interaction sequence (eg tap corners of the screen in a particular order) to bring up a developer console. The key here is, the app has to ...


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It depends on the use-cases of the application. If its an app for kids, a 5 tap easter egg would get discovered in no time. But if its say, a financial app then its reasonably expected that no one would routinely discover the easter egg. I personally like the easter egg option, as it adds an element of discovery and surprise for the user who discovers it, ...


3

Toasts which indicate mutually exclusive actions (eg checkbox on/off selections or like/dislike) should never appear onscreen at the same time The presence of conflicting statuses can cause cognitive dissonance or outright confusion for users. The vertical stacking order and chronological order of appearance isn't enough for the user to reliably interpret ...


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Per the Material Design Guidelines on top-level view strategies, three main strategies are: Focus on a single view with embedded navigation. By putting all the necessary navigation directly inline with other app content, you make it extremely visible to the user. This can be appropriate when the app’s navigation model is very simple. However, presenting ...


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Instagram actually uses this design pattern in their android app. I would go back to the basics and understand what is best for your user. Android and iOS users have different expectations when it comes to using apps based on muscle memory from common design patterns. If something looks good in iOS it will most likely also look good in Android but that ...


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Look to future proof and understand the Google Material design guidance. (TL;DR: icon buttons on top page for navigation is in line with the Material design ) Explicitly "Top-level view strategies section" in Material Design - UI regions and guidance section is very clear that you can Use tabs to switch between a small number of equally important ...


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There's no many apps using them on Android because Google explicitly discourage on its design guidelines. Each platform has their own visual language, so I completely disagree with implementing this on Android. More: http://developer.android.com/design/patterns/pure-android.html


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Have you looked at Google Map's floor navigator? This is an interface that has millions of global users: You may also want to look up BIM or Building Information Management software. There is a lot of work going into BIM interfaces to navigate 3D building models. Hope that helps


1

One reason why you might not want to do this: The user may see both options, and assume they are different actions, and then be confused about which one they should use to perform their desired action. However if both buttons change visually when the user has performed the action, then it is likely they will notice that they are the same option, and ...


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Are you married to the idea of the tabs? What if you simplified the entire view and provided all replies, with an appropriate action to view/listen? This allows the user to quickly browse all the replies without having to jump around. Suggestion for on-tap actions per comment type: Comments: Either expands or slides over Audio Comment: Audio plays ...


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I don't think the tab bar pattern is bad in itself but the current one looks visually too heavy. How about a lighter colored tab bar like this one seen in the material design guidelines?


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I agree that it doesn't look great. Do you need to feature a specific comment? If not, then I think a successful approach with material design is to have a bottom sheet that slides up to full screen with the tab control: These would not be tabs but as the sheet slides up it can morph into a top-aligned tab control, with whatever tab the user selected ...


1

There are accessibility issues to consider too. One user might have a touch sensitive screen, another a mouse, and a third might be severely disabled and using voice recognition to simulate keyboard input. Dave's photo gallery could cope nicely with that, the disabled user just repeating the word "Space" when required. So I believe that multiple ways of ...


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While multiple paths to do something might be convenient, this has a flip side. Consider the PCB design software I'm using. The image below shows two of many ways to add a new schematic document to the current project: As many other features are also accessible from multiple places, the amount of buttons and menus in the software is enormous. If options ...


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Multiple indicators for the same thing are good. I just recommend that you tie your code to the same base methods/functions to determine follow/unfollow. Otherwise, you'll have a lot of coupling and sprawl.


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Many ways to perform the same action is fine Just make sure they don't get in the way of the most important task at hand. No two users are created equal Anyone who has done usability testing knows that each person has their own unique workflow. It is good to accommodate each individual style and workflow. Andrew Martin correctly points out in the ...


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This is common practice so this is acceptable. you can see on youtube when browsing a video/channel you can decide to unsubscribe on the spot. Also when managing your subscriptions.


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On Android this is also very common pattern but with few differences. On Android you position this tabs on top of the screen (mainly because of hardware buttons on the bottom of the phone) You can use scrollable or fixed tabs (for more info: http://developer.android.com/design/building-blocks/tabs.html)


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This is a very intuitive navigation and shouldn't be any issue. I can't give you any examples of top apps that are using this, but it doesn't mean that the user won't easily understand it. I'd suggest just going with your gut and doing what makes sense for you. I'd also suggest doing user testing on your app in wire frames or limited functionality with even ...


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Why can't we have bread crumbs or navigator instead? Home > Categories > Books > Book ABC > Author After Back button Home > Categories > Books > Book ABC


2

Yes, you should use the up button. It may “look like a back button” on Lollipop, specially if you’ve seen iOS, but the behavior is still the same, it didn’t change. Check the Play Store app, for example. It is important to remember that the aesthetics of the back button on Android itself also changed, it is now a triangle, so they are not really similar ...


0

It's fine! A quick glance through any major Android apps will show you that the menu or settings button alternates from top-left to top-right, and many other buttons go near the bottom. Aside from those standards, you can do almost anything. As long as you provide ample finger-space for the buttons (good article at Smashing Magazine), you can put buttons ...


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Here is how I would solve the problem of scoring a fencing match using a smartphone 1. Make the timer section clearly separate from everything else By separating the timer section at the top from the rest of the screen it is easier to see it at a glance and becomes a clear hit area for starting, stopping, resetting the time. tap to start or stop the ...



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