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There are two cases, and two different optimal behaviours Clearly if the app has the language available that user has chosen in Android, then it should not display anything and app should "just work". Having a language choosing chore is an unnecessary task for a user, and that's poor UX. If your app does not have the language on the Android platform, then ...


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Depending on how important it is for the user to choose the language, you could: proactively ask the user in the on boarding flow which language they'd like (and depending on the device's chosen language you might be able to predict which languages they are likely to choose) not proactively ask the user, but include the option for the user to change the ...


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I think adapting the app to device language is an idiot idea. For most users the default language is not what they have chosen. It depends on where they have bought their device. A Spanish marketplace mostly sells devices with Spanish as default language. We are not supposed to guess the user preferred language. Preferred language depends on lots of ...


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Google's Material Design documents only mentions following: Touching a text field places the cursor and automatically displays the keyboard. Text fields - Components - Google Design Guidelines Same is said in API Guide for Android developers. Neither mentions the reason why to show keyboard only after the user have tapped the text field. Going on a ...


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To answer your first question, I don't think it's necessary to allow users to edit statuses/tweets for FB and Twitter. But, that does depend on what your app is trying to achieve. As another suggestion, why not make it all the same thing? In other words, create one text area where a user can input a caption to their photo/video. Whatever they put in that ...


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I think I grasped your question correctly: you want to redesign a web site, and the accompanying native app should look similar to it. You need a native app for certain features like push notifications. By going down the native route it would require you to override the GUI controls in whatever platform and redraw these controls to look how you designed ...


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You could use your web app design in your android and iOS app quite easily. It would also provide continuity to your users, who would be able to switch from one to the other with ease. Note that this image is quite dated. With the advent of HTML5 one can create even more impressive web apps. Source: ...


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One thing I've seen some apps do (ex: CamScanner, Idea Growr) is to display a notification which says "Press back again to exit" if the back button would trigger an exit. This doesn't stop accidental presses during internal app navigation, but it at least prevents the user from exiting the entire app by accident. For internal navigation, something you could ...


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I believe this is already very clearly handled on android devices. There is only one back button Applications should have only their own 'up' buttons, not back buttons. Applications should never ever add their own back buttons. The 'up' buttons which you probably are confusing are about going up in the application hierarchy, whereas the back button is ...


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When I design for Android, I don't use in-app back buttons. Android users should be accustomed to the platform's built in back button, so including a back button is redundant, and, as you mention, potentially confusing. As for accidental presses of those buttons, is that documented or anecdotal? This is the first I've heard of it.


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1. Make the buttons tactile Tactile buttons do nothing when your finger rests on top of them and require physical force to click them. All external buttons on Apple devices are tactile with the exception of the touch id fingerprint reader which has very few negative consequences from accidental touch. Some Android devices use tactile buttons as well so ...


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As Benny says, it depends on the overall navigation metaphor/paradigm of the app. In one app I built, the metaphor was a home page, and the user opened additional windows on top to view details on entities/objects. They were all full screen (not like pop up dialogs), but the metaphor was "layers" instead of navigation steps. In that case, the X was ...


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Oh, I'm sorry to give you this standard answer on UX.SE, but really it depends. It depends on whether or not you're closing the page or moving back from the page. It depends on whether or not you're closing the product, because you don't need/want it or moving away from it. Personally, a closing icon is related to delete and destroy, and that's not what ...


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If you can't put all three buttons (why not?), another option is an action combo button where the primary (or most important for your site) action is the default. When the user clicks in the "button" area the displayed action is triggered. The other actions are available by clicking the down arrow.


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When you want to sell products to customers, it should be made apparently clear how to “Add product to Basket” and “Check-Out” the product and pay. For this reason alone, option two is the preferred one. It is clear, and to the point. One click less is one click less of a bailout. The dots are commonly known as “More…” option where favorites and stock items ...


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Yes within a fixed period of time and fixed user story No in the environment of changing technology, requirements and user expectations


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If I'm correct your question is if there is a point where refinement of the design can't improve the user experience or even make it worse? No, always assume there is a “better”, at least if you are in a competitive business. New technologies, hypes, desires etc. constantly come and go. That is why research and testing are so important to do at every stage ...


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Art is never finished, only abandoned. -Leonardo da Vinci Most projects have business requirements that eventually trump further iterations of a specific interface. There may be new interfaces that have more urgent deadlines, or it might not be worth paying your salary to refine an interface only three customers use. Outside of business projects, ...


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It all depends on how you determin complete. Is that when you have implemente all the feature request? Is it just before your application starts to suffer from feature creep? I do agree with the other responses that state that context and expectations of the users and other stakeholders will change over time.


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In German, we say "Der Appetit kommt beim Essen" - to @Bluewater 's list I thus add "use cases change" (i.e., often extend). A UI can at most be complete in the sense that this year's cars are complete - after next year's motor show you'll want another.


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A resturant menu contains categories and you should be more focused on those. Define categories and then let the user search in categories. Also you can provide extra feature to search among all category just by typing key words. A dynamic list should pop up from where user can select the cusine. Also he should be given a recently ordered list like a ...


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You have an application not a brochure - this can make the IA more flexible. The epicurious mobile app has a useful faceted search see top right slide In this UI user gets to choose which criteria are important to them, and supply only those before browsing key ingredients cuisines of interest courses dietary requirements So can specify a "pork & ...


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No. It goes against the user. If they click something once, it should do the exact same thing each time after, because it is counter-intuitive for a single button to have two functions, unless both are clearly shown, which at the same time, is also bad, because you will have to long a description on too small a space. A way to describe both, if this is the ...


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I was thinking more or less the same as @ADTC. The problem with this UI is that it is deceiving the user, by not fully updating the location when the "update location" button is tapped. I would forget about this battery saving strategy, and try to find others, like for example not updating anything when the app doesn't have the user's full attention. Fading ...


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There's quite a bit on this in Google's Material Design Guide. Amongst the guidelines: Don't: Linear motion feels mechanical. Accelerate objects swiftly and decelerate them slowly to avoid abrupt changes in velocity. When an object enters the frame, ensure that it's moving at its peak velocity. The android also has animation duration constants - ...


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First of all, I suggest to move your location button to the "bottom-right" corner, it will be more accessible to the user. Top-right corner is too far to reach with a thumb (when user is using the phone with one-hand). Secondly, if you are pulling the current location every few minutes already and displaying it to the user, then tapping the "location" ...


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BDD's excellent answer provides reasoning why you should update the location more frequently than few minutes. This is especially important when the user is moving out of the blue circle more quickly than the circle can be moved to the new location. However, if your app really does not require updates any more frequent than just a few minutes, I would ...


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I agree somewhat with @adam.heleniak, though I do believe (and have seen many examples of good) double-tap gestures work just fine. In the case you are using it, however, that's a poor UX. Users have no reason to ever double tap on it to get their location. Furthermore, the function itself is used in a multitude of other map apps, where a single tap will ...


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So I did my thesis research in grad school on wayfinding and identification on mobile devices and one of the things I noticed constantly was that while people were out completing the test, there was a HUGE reliance on the blue dot for people to show them where they are in the real world. That was why most of my users didn't do well on navigation style tasks. ...


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Double tap is not a widely acceptable navigation pattern on a touch user interface. Therefore I would discourage using it unless you indicate it to the user that if they click twice then they would get a more accurate location set. You could visualize it with e.g: a different icon during these 3 seconds change of size of the icon - bigger, standing out ...


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Users do not really see the "Up" button that you have described as "Going up". For users both "Up" and "Back" buttons are just "Back" buttons. Android has a back button on the device/hardware itself. This creates a lot of UX issues for the users. Because users need to jump back and forth from hardware button to software buttons while they are browsing the ...


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The Up button should appear only when you have drilled into a particular item within an app and should never take the user out of the current app, while pressing the Back key can even exit the current app and drop you into another app altogether.


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Display one record at a time and swipe left and right to go to the next record. Each screen can be something like: CUSTOMER NAME Sale Date Order Number Product Number Product Name Order Type Etc.



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