New answers tagged

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You can place the ad between the buttons as bottom area of the screen will be in more focus because of these two buttons there. Also, I don't see an issue of being clicked unwillingly as user knows which area of the screen represents the button. Logically, this is like clicking a button on the Physical device say a calculator.


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You need to mention your intentions that what you expect from the users. If you badly want users to tap on your ad (intentionally or unintentionally) you can place it between the buttons. The present generation using the smart phones are aware of the banner ads and they'll probably be careful. But the older users might just press it mistakenly and that's ...


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Generally, when you can select multiple filters in an application, it is necessary to place the Apply button for clarity. With multiple filters, using the onItemSelectedListener is a bad idea since as you mentioned, it will close on the user and will not work accordingly as per user expectation. I would recommend having a smooth transition and sliding up ...


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Are you really getting any benefit on removing the app bar? Remember that by removing it, the user is losing consistency on the navigation which may lead to some confusion. Even though on Android devices we have the back button, the programmer will still need to take that in consideration so the device's back button takes the user to the previous view ...


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You should probably use material design steppers because its simple and it would fit in with the rest of your android environment. Since they are designed by google the general idea is to look clean and neat while providing enough information that people can operate the steps. You can read about them here: https://material.google.com/components/steppers.html#...


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Best practice states you should follow the UI standards and conventions for each platform. The big challenge of course is iOS and Google Android standards are not always that compatible, plus it can be more expensive to build two different looking solutions, even though this would be best for the person using the phone. So you really only have two options: ...


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Just a quick suggestion, you could possibly disable the submit button, but have the text on it change to 'Submitting...' and also disable all of the form fields, so that the user can't then submit the form using the keyboard. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I don't know about the feasibility of adding a loading ...


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I would do both 1 and 2, but also present the user with a message. Having a message will guide the user's expectation and avoid unnecessary concern by the user. The message doesn't have to say much, even just that the form is submitting and will take up to 30s.


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It's both annoying and confusing: Annoying because it's covering the images. Confusing because it is out of context. You're on a page where you are looking for offers nearby, there's no reason to include a Sell It button. I recommend you look at this app called Saily for benchmarking. The option for "Buy it" or "Sell it" shouldn't be available on the ...


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I'm assuming this is a Direct Primary Action similar to Instagram's New Photo button. Is it annoying? No. Is it confusing? Hell yes. Reasons that it is confusing: The button is floating. If you want to have a Floating Action Button, you could use the Android Design Support Library and use the FAB itself without any text needed. On Android, it looks like ...


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It mostly depends on how many secondary screens the user can access from your main menu. If the user can access to 4 or more screens from it (and take into account that the access to the settings screen should be into the overflow menu in the action bar OR in the navigation drawer, so don't count it by now) go with the navigation drawer. If the accesses to ...


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Great question, Adam! No, it is not necessary to have a Back button in the Toolbar if you have a Navigation bar in the Activity. A rule of thumb to follow is that you can substitute Tabs instead of Navigation Drawer if the tabs are limited i.e. 3-4 or else have scrollable tabs. Considering the fact that you are in the Secondary Activity of an App, it need ...


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Make the checkboxes bigger - this is not a problem for users with age 30+ because their vision is not on 100% as before. Use button. You should design it to contrast your current color scheme so it is easilty visible. Use some accent colors (A100,A200, A400,A700) from the material design pallete to do that. You should play with the accent colors to find the ...


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As you know you're relying on colour to depict up/down which isn't great especially as both types of change are reflected in an upward facing bar. Some ideas 1) Place the change as a label on each bar e.g. -17% or +38% 2) Change to up and down bars and move it up above the tab labels like below 3) Move the negative change bars below the tab labels ...


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Make negative values go below the axis. Your proposed design may gain slightly in the level of precision shown. However, I doubt this really matters. Even if you keep the chart in the same vertical space, I think you will adequately show the differences between bars. Plotting positive and negative values both in the same direction makes the chart a lot ...


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So you're basically replacing the visual variable of position to denote a negative value with the visual variable of colour - this has been termed a 'mirrored' chart. The positives as you're seeing is that it saves space, the negatives are people may not understand it and it may cause some issues for the colour-blind (though red-blue problems are not as ...


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I like the way Ubuntu has solved this problem. Admittedly it's a bit wordy, and may confuse total tech illiterates a little bit. But it's very technically accurate, and I find it a good solution. This screenshot is from the native disk management tool in 16.04.


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Can you replace the checkbox with a toggle, some kind of select-button? I would place a large green submit-button at the bottom right of the page. Perhaps in its own row so it will always be visible to the user. The user shall be able to scroll trough the items and when the users is done selecting, the button is there at the "end of the list" were the users ...


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Without knowing much about the app and desired user tasks, I would leverage the multi-step process and bake it into the ui. Let it be the personality and character of the UX. I agree that hiding the affordance is not a good approach. Make it as enjoyable and fun as you can!


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Tabs are making a comeback for their superior user engagement. It's an "out of sight, out of mind" kind of phenomena with users and drawer style controllers.



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