New answers tagged

1

Tabs are making a comeback for their superior user engagement. It's an "out of sight, out of mind" kind of phenomena with users and drawer style controllers.


2

It really depends on the path user has followed to dial a number. Logically one should be kept at the point where they have left before dialing.


2

I think you should consider this question not just in the context of doing a search and making the call, but also how this fits into the rest of the interactions/behaviours for the app. So think about if you want your users to have the same experience if they weren't searching in the contact list but were on the home screen and received a call. Think about ...


4

It's good to bring people back to where they were before they started a task. This means the homescreen (task = make phone call), and the search screen (task = call a specific person) are good end positions. You can argue that going to the recent calls makes it easy to re-dial in case you forgot something. However, that phone number should also be listed in ...


0

"Back" means that you go back to the previous screen. The android back button also serves the same principle. Since your app's back button would bring the user back to the home screen rather than back to the previous screen, I'd call the button differently. Maybe "Done" or "Home".


1

How about: Formatting SD card will erase existing data. Continue with erasure?


1

Add another paragraph after the warning that your data may not be retrievable: Warning: formatting is not an authorized method of destroying classified or confidential data such as old passwords, naughty photos, or your credit card number. (What would I recommend? (a) contact a reputable data destruction service, (b) read the government standards for ...


2

The question is not so much about what the OS is doing, as clarifying the assumptions that naive users are making about what the OS is doing. How about ... Formatting this card will allow it to be used for new data storage. Assume you will not be able to recover your old data. Assume that any bad guy that gets this card will be able to recover your old ...


4

Maybe the UX should go in a completely different direction here. Starting with some (always dangerous) assumptions about context: The majority of users landing on this bit of UI are here because they want to re-use the SD card on the same device. They have no intention of removing the SD card, or sharing it with anyone. And many of those users actually ...


1

I think the message is fine. It's not about giving people all the information, or even all the options. Formatting SD card will delete all data on this specific card Serial Number XXXXXXXXX. Data cannot be easily recovered, but may be recovered using some tools with an unknown degree of success depending on how many sectors of this device are altered ...


5

I know the question is about the text, but in addition to others responses, consider that user don't always read what you have written and can click on a single button as a habit/reflex. Consider adding 2 buttons with exact same formatting to force them process the information


5

I would suggest "Data will likely be unrecoverable" as having a clear meaning that is unlikely to materially mislead anyone. While it is true that the likelihood of data being truly unrecoverable if nothing is done with the cartridge following the format might not be as high as the adverb "likely" would suggest, few if any users will care about the odds in ...


0

As per my understanding,you having confusion with the toolbar. I think when we are displaying the profile info at that time there should be only one back icon in the screen because if you toolbar contains different menu from the profile then there is no need to display toolbar in profile screen. Below is the figure in which I tried to explain you this ...


1

I wouldn't add Data cannot be recovered I would add it only in the case of a full erase (in case you have the option available to your users). An other issue is with Continue ? I believe you than give "Yes" and "No" as choices to your users ? If you do, it probably isn't the best practice as it forces the user to read the whole message to know ...


28

I see no problem with the message that other suggestions completely solve. Formatting SD card will delete all data. Data cannot be recovered. Continue? Data cannot be recovered gives a very good sense of urgency, and speaks well to the target audience who at this juncture needs to know the likely worst case scenario. Even though the data can be ...


14

Really good question. I've thought about this inaccuracy (although in a security, not UX context) and had to explain to several colleagues that most "delete" options (yes, even formatting a drive) are not secure and that the data is quite often recoverable. I have never found it difficult, nor has anyone failed to understand, that the way to think about ...


122

"Recovered" is a poor choice of words here. All that app is trying to do is warn people that the action is not reversible and they can't simply hit cancel or undo and all their files will be returned. A better solution would be: Formatting SD card will delete all data. This action cannot be undone. Continue? This is more direct to the point that you ...


1

"Consistent UI as opposed to native experience" is a contradiction in terms: if you break the native interface conventions, you are by definition not providing a consistent UI for your users. Your application doesn't exist in a vacuum. Users switch between apps frequently, especially on mobile devices, so it is important that your app follows the same ...


1

Just look at it. Stack exchange UI design that isn't platform specific. So should your design be, but only if you make a simple appealing design, and not an overcomplicated grey mess of buttons (seen that one before). If it's good than yes, use custom UI, if no, then use built in UI.


1

It is a good idea given that a product image alone is sufficient for the user to follow your recommendations. It'll work for cloths but might not be effective for hardware. The latter example will require adding some detail. And the presented design will struggle if you have anything more than a line of extra text below each image. Assuming that image alone ...


4

Summary: Carousel control has some drawbacks on mobile. More straightforward solution could work better. Still, A/B test is the best way to evaluate the idea. Some consideration on using carousel control: Interaction style People interact with a mobile in a specific way. You can find some insights in the How Do Users Really Hold Mobile Devices? ...


5

In your UX approach, users have to be your top priority. An Android user will have different habits to an iOS user and vice versa. You are talking about a "feel". I understand this to mean a graphic feel, and the answer is YES: keep the "graphic feel" common between platforms. If you're talking about interaction design (navigation, action buttons, ...


1

It depends on how the application is going to be used. The point here is to maintain a consistent experience for the user. If the user is only going to be working with one platform then you need to be consistent with the patterns generally used by that platform. I found myself working on a hybrid application the other day - part of the app was native and ...


0

On iOS at least, a picker view (technically named UIPickerView) is commonly used for presenting a list and making a selection. This view is typically presented from the bottom of the screen. You can get something like this:


2

If you want to make it available to "dig deeper infinitely through the application", it's really gonna be difficult to use. But if there are only 2 or 3 levels of hierarchies, you can do some indentations. (courtesy of IMDb app) The screenshot here only has two levels, but if you want to go deeper, you could have a sub-level with more indentation. (Just ...


1

Your colours are pretty irrelevant because you are using textual callout labels to re-enforce the meaning, e.g. 550 Winning, 228 Lose, 204 Tie. Because of this you can now offer a new feature to the user - personalize the colours. Of course, if you are using text to unambiguously communicate the results, you have to question the use of a circular graphic, ...


0

Color manipulation in design is very important. Sometimes this is due to personal preference, and other times due to professional background. Color knowledge is a science in itself. Studying how colors affect different people, either individually or as a group, is something some people build their careers on. Apart from me your color combination is okay ! ...


4

Generally, for mobiles, breadcrumbs are not recommended; the back button is what the users are familiar with. Also, it is said that; if your app needs a breadcrumb then your app is not easy to use. Even though, if you really want to introduce one - try what Windows does for the deep hierarchies:


1

Ok, though it depends on the details of application and the purchase process, but I believe that those are too much status. "open order" is the default status of any order, because there is no "closed order" before purchase. default status does not need an extra indicator. For "acknowledged" , it will make sense only if the order is from a third party ...


5

As a user, I would have no idea what the different colors would mean. I think you should write the title of each status underneath in small caps. If you do that, here are my color suggestions: OPEN - Blue, by default color. ACKNOWLEDGED - Orange, you need to notify the user. You could have the button fade rapidly from grey to white and back to show that ...


9

Just a small extra consideration but I'll make it an answer anyway. I tend to listen to the radio via an app whilst playing casual games so need to be able to choose which app's volume to control. If I had to use the volume control for all apps I wouldn't be able to complete half of my objective (as I want to do both). This goes beyond the other answers that ...


12

TL;DR: An app forcing me to use the global mute would be uninstalled in the blink of an eye. So they better have a mute function if they want to use audio at all. EDIT: The previous was a bit too short for an answer, here's an explanation: Audio is in essence quite intrusive, that is, you can hardly block it out. That's different from vision - you can ...


7

Mobile OSes usually have broad scoped sound controls instead of app specific ones. Android (AOSP) sound volume has three separated controls: one for general effects and notifications, another one for multimedia apps and the last one for alarms. But those are system-wide, so adding sound controls into the app you can control the app specific sound volume ...


-1

Another consideration is that physical parts can break, especially in cheaper devices. So it's good to have a software alternative on the OS or app level.


58

The physical mute and volume buttons affect all other apps too. It's better to have a mute button in your app because as a user I may only want to mute the notifications from your app and not others. For example, there's a chance I want to mute Facebook notifications but not those from Twitter. So for that I'd need a mute button in Facebook because the ...


1

Why don't mobile devices utilise keyboard shortcuts? They do! I'm using a device that does that right now. It's called a BlackBerry. While it doesn't have shortcuts for copy and paste (because there are only the letter keys, which are being used to type, and no control keys), in non text-entry situations such as reading email, shortcuts abound. 'I' and 'O' ...


0

There should be a couple of documents that guide you in this process, or if not then a UX designer will be quite handy. I have found that a comprehensive "Design Framework" will cover all of the applicable standards and guidelines that are required for you to implement the functional requirements, but if not then someone will have to do the interpretation. ...


1

The main reason behind keyboard shortcuts is to make command selections faster. According to Fitts' Law time to point at an object depends on the distance to that object and its size. On a desktop distances between UI elements are bigger and their sizes often smaller compared to mobile versions. On top of that mobile keyboards are initially hidden and keys ...


1

The shortcuts on computers exist because you have (at least) two different ways of interacting with your user interface, namely using a keyboard, and using a mouse / touch-pad. In order to switch from one to the other, you have to move your hand(s) to use the other method. Also the mouse requires precision to use correctly, something which may be difficult ...


2

In general, it is useful to have shortcuts on desktops because you are use the keyboard anyway. On a smartphone or tablet on the other hand, you are not continuously using a keyboard. Therefore, you would need to open the keyboard, to be able to do certain actions, which would simply result in an extra step for the user in the process (opening the keyboard, ...


0

You can have tool tip on a word I think this will be the only idea to display the short description of one word. But ya you can direct the user by highlighting the word. Fro example you can give blink effect on the word which have short description. I have just highlighted the word here with Red color you can give effect on the word like constant changing ...


0

You can try something like this. It would be subtle and not to flash; even on mobile devices. Image 1 and when user taps on the underlined word, it would display a small prompt. Image 2



Top 50 recent answers are included