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These guidelines existed even before Android L. Yes, it applies to all notifications, including ongoing (in progress). If you have two notifications of the same type, you should summarize them into one. Optionally, you can provide an expanded view that provides individual details. If you are only uploading one at a time you can consider the following ...


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On developers.android.com you can find very useful information about "Navigation with Back and Up" button in Android Apps. The standard behavior of the "Back" button is to navigate in reverse chronological order: The system Back button is used to navigate, in reverse chronological order, through the history of screens the user has recently worked ...


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The ActionSheetPicker library seems to do this pretty well.


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Normally, I might suggest both, as there is no harm giving the user extra help.... However, what you really need is to increase the visibility of the button so that it cannot be missed by anyone wanting extra detail. This is much clearer than the arrow at the top, the purpose of which is not obvious. It could conceiveably: take you to a screen with ...


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It sounds like you've answer your own question: How to indicate specific sections of a page can be swiped addresses a broader question. The suggestions on that page are excellent but they would result in a lot of noise if repeated for many items on a list. They are also more appropriate when swiping part of a page results in a larger change in ...


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I suggest using multiple activities. You could check the form after every activity and make elements bigger which makes your UX better. This way there could be +/- 5 inputs in one activity. Once done the user could click on a nice big next button. (Since they have never used android before this makes it easier.) The activity then checks the data and if ...


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I've found this article by Vedran Arnautovic very interesting and informative. According to the author's research these are the main reasons "why card based interaction patterns work and what makes them attractive to users": Cards support our limited working memory by allowing us to break up information through the process of chunking and focus on ...


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If the question is taken at face value, i.e. strictly a choice between the →/↓ arrows or the +/- signs, then I suggest using arrows. Arrows denote the direction and a sense of movement to another place or view. +/- signs could be construed as meaning add / remove. For example it looks like I can add a manufacturer, or add an Extra item. While, the minus ...


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What about using progressive disclosure. So when the user clicks on the checkbox you display the input field. This way you will only display the fields when they are needed and use of animation will catch users attention. Other option is removing checkboxes and asking the user to fill out one of the input fields. Please select one of the alternative ...


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Swarm has a solid branding reason, as shown above, and there are surely a couple who use it for a futuristic feeling, but for most sites, it boils down to novelty. It may feel more exciting, like when sites started using circles rather than squares to contain faces. (To be fair, there's a iffy but real case for circles as more humane.) But there's nothing ...


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As for the UX aspect of this question, I'm going to have to say I very much doubt their effectiveness. If anything, perhaps it's because they cut off a slightly smaller part of the image within the same square dimensions: Having said that, I'm pretty sure Swarm's reason for using hexagons relates to their branding, which draws from nature's very own ...



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