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Why don't mobile devices utilise keyboard shortcuts? They do! I'm using a device that does that right now. It's called a BlackBerry. While it doesn't have shortcuts for copy and paste (because there are only the letter keys, which are being used to type, and no control keys), in non text-entry situations such as reading email, shortcuts abound. 'I' and 'O' ...


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There should be a couple of documents that guide you in this process, or if not then a UX designer will be quite handy. I have found that a comprehensive "Design Framework" will cover all of the applicable standards and guidelines that are required for you to implement the functional requirements, but if not then someone will have to do the interpretation. ...


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The main reason behind keyboard shortcuts is to make command selections faster. According to Fitts' Law time to point at an object depends on the distance to that object and its size. On a desktop distances between UI elements are bigger and their sizes often smaller compared to mobile versions. On top of that mobile keyboards are initially hidden and keys ...


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The shortcuts on computers exist because you have (at least) two different ways of interacting with your user interface, namely using a keyboard, and using a mouse / touch-pad. In order to switch from one to the other, you have to move your hand(s) to use the other method. Also the mouse requires precision to use correctly, something which may be difficult ...


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In general, it is useful to have shortcuts on desktops because you are use the keyboard anyway. On a smartphone or tablet on the other hand, you are not continuously using a keyboard. Therefore, you would need to open the keyboard, to be able to do certain actions, which would simply result in an extra step for the user in the process (opening the keyboard, ...


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You can have tool tip on a word I think this will be the only idea to display the short description of one word. But ya you can direct the user by highlighting the word. Fro example you can give blink effect on the word which have short description. I have just highlighted the word here with Red color you can give effect on the word like constant changing ...


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You can try something like this. It would be subtle and not to flash; even on mobile devices. Image 1 and when user taps on the underlined word, it would display a small prompt. Image 2


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If you're just looking for an icon that denotes a button for users to tap on to check the number of spots left at an event, then perhaps something like these mockups I did up quickly: Depending on the actual purpose of the icon, I would strongly suggest adding an appropriate label. For example, if the idea is that users can tap on the icon to view a ...


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It's difficult to give a complete answer without understanding the requirements, but there is a (potentially) existing pattern in stock Android - the data usage tab. User selects the upper maximum by dragging the x-axis line up and down to set the maximum. Downside is it may not give you the required precision to select the value - but you may be able to ...


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If you only have room for one object, then you could use interpret a string like "unlimited" or "Infinite". Make sure you check for all possible input possibilities though! Capitalizations, different words, the number 0 is often used. As you can see, this is messy. A much safer and gradual option would be to have a toggle and a textbox (or other selector). ...


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Additionally, from a UX/UI perspective, don't use a close symbol for delete. It's generally accepted in users minds that the circle X is for closing something like a pop up. The most common symbol comes from your phone itself that looks like this: Delete Symbol. Use a check mark for Done and you will have a good balance for that section that allows common ...


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First of all, you should change the visual aspect of these buttons so that they don't all look like they will perform the same way. Make sure that the tabs as obviously tabs, that they buttons below that are obviously buttons and that they "done" and "delete" button obviously will complete some sort of interaction. Right now everything looks the same, which ...


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I'm wondering why you chose to use the view controller on iOS app. iPhone typically uses tabs for navigation while Android often makes use of menu (hamburger icon) for navigation. I know I have a hard time with how to deal with a drilled down navigation in a tabbed app but keeping the tabs and making good use of the back button and edit on the right hand ...


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you have to user SliderPageControl https://github.com/honcheng/SliderPageControl-for-iOS/tree/master/SliderPageControl


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This seems to be tricky since you have to show so many informations on a very small display. Let's set on the user needs perspective, they probably are interested in comparing same informations about different products (for example comparing the "Screen size" for the 3 products. Your approach let the user see all informations of a single product, so the user ...


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Good UX would be to use the guidelines for Android apps, which would be to NOT have a close button. But instead using all the app management solutions provided by Android OS. Android apps generally do not have close buttons. But instead have a designed interface that developers can use which makes the apps appear integrated in to the operating system and ...


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The fact that this is an audio stream makes a difference to the user. If the sound is suddenly unwanted then you want to allow the user to kill it as quickly as possible, and the [X] is the most likely option to be used in this scenario. [X] is definitely a close / remove action, so it won't be a surprise that it immediately stops the stream.


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The closest I know to what you're looking for is Material Design UI Kit and Android Lollipop UI Kit Sketch Resource, both of them made by Ivan Bjelajac, but I doubt you'll find something with all possible states, so if you're in the mood for doing it, I'd say go on and do it!


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Yes there is. Swiping from the top activates an overpanel on both iOs and Android (I don't know about Blackberry). However, I don't think this is what you're looking for. The obvious reason against implementing it this way, is that it will conflict with the native behavior of your phone. Besides, how would the user know from where to swipe to trigger the ...


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As a matter of fact, Material has some very specific guidelines with examples for processing actions. Be sure to check them because your approach is not the one to follow if you want to stick to Material Guidelines, but there are some different examples that might help you depending on the nature of your process. This being said, remember that Material is ...


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I would suggest you to follow the standards since that is what users are expecting from the list. Yet, I would set the chevron at the left of the element and the counter between parenthesis with a secondary color. The chevron is a standard so that would behave as the user expect it, but probably you could explore removing the chevron; since it's for mobile ...


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How are people going to know that the chevron animates once tapped if they don't know the area can be tapped and thus expand? Adding extra list items to something that you are not aware expands just adds extra clunkyness to your design and continued ambiguity for the user. I'm not saying follow googles solution verbatim but they have designed it that way for ...



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