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You can get user to used to it. Just put the (icon or name of the action) what it is intended for . It should be on the App bar on the extreme right position. So whenever user tap on icon, it will just slide near from it (from right side).So from next time user can just slide it.


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If you mean an indicator that tells you whether a price is high or low (compared to whatever reference group) and can do your own icon design/ selection, I would suggest something like the following: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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You can use 3 characters for depiction of price if price is high use ↑ character if price is low use ↓ character else if price is medium or ok use ↔ character


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There are two options to consider: Reword the answers. I guess, when you need to cancel "this action", that action has an actual name. Then the opposite of canceling is keeping it. Then the popup may state something like this: Another option is to cancel the action and then provide a non-modal popup to undo the cancellation.


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Confirmations must not ambiguous. The user must not try to interpret what the options will do. Make each option as specific and clear as possible. Also, omit unnecessary words. For example if the action of the user is the deletion of a record, the message dialog should look something like this : download bmml source – Wireframes created with ...


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In Android items of lesser importance traditionally go under 3-dot menu. I guess, something like this would be appropriate in your case:


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The 'about' link could be placed bellow the login button. This way the one click access to information is retained without breaking the overall visual theme of android. This space can be used also to show a few other links e.g. 'terms', 'register' etc. This group of links should be appropriately spaced from the login button so that users don't end up ...


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Your best option isn't to use an icon at all, especially for such an ambiguous option. Your clearest option for the user is to actually use the word Practice. There is no icon that's universal in even the slightest sense that would symbolize "practice" to your users. Icons should only be used when there is a universal understanding behind them, and ...


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There's currently no (wide-spread) specific symbol for practice or training, at least not for self-practice. There's something for training/schooling, but I don't think that's what you're looking for: In this context I'd focus more on the tracking aspect, i.e. progress, which can be shown with graphs and charts, so you could use those as a symbol in ...


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Wouldn't users share from a detail view? If list sharing is important, do make sure you won't repeat the same sharing icon on every line.


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Wow this is a crazy coincidence! I literally had this same problem today trying to design a two-level deep filter in iOS and tried stacking segmented controls. It didn't get positive feedback and we ended up restructuring the information into different areas. I kept one segmented control (very similar to Android's tabs) that only changed the view underneath ...


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Android navigation belongs at the top The Material Guidelines are pretty clear on that subject. Aside from the bizarre usability of it, putting navigation at the bottom is solidly associated with iOS. In-context navigation may be the answer In a three-level situation like this, it's common to dive down to a dedicated page and use the "up arrow" control ...


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Seems like this is the intended design and workarounds would not be recommended IMO. http://developer.android.com/training/keyboard-input/visibility.html excerpt: Note: Once the input method is visible, you should not programmatically hide it. The system hides the input method when the user finishes the task in the text field or the user can hide it ...


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You can use a sliding layout to slide the list over the map. List List - anchored, with map Map with list collapsed User can slide the list using the list header which can display list summary. Pros: Action bar can be used for other purposes Both map and list can be view at the same time Cons: May clutter small screens Both map and list can ...


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Unless you are building a scientific app, people tend to set time in 5-minute increments. Then the picker may look like this:


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You could do the mobile version of amazons 1click ordering, (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1-Click) In your case would be interesting if it were a 1 swipe checkout. this will be only for returning customers as their previous purchase info like payment and delivery will be used


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If there is a Done button on the right top corner and the header is sticky (always visible) then that is enough to tell/indicate the user that changes will be saved only on clicking the Done button. Also, if the user uses back button of the phone then you can show a modal-box to check if user wants to save their changes or not (just to be on safe side). If ...


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This is a tricky issue. You could add a slight drop shadow to your menu icon. If making the toolbar transparent is so important, you might want to consider doing some image sampling and inverse the background color of the toolbar. For example light background image -> black transparent toolbar, vice versa. Although I'm not sure how you can achieve that in ...


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I do not agree a spiner is the fastest way. It may be fast for birthdays if you are young enough or if the date is near the default... But i hate that scrolling, it takes much longer than 3 fields and a numeric keyboard. What is faster: scrolling up to 30 days, scrolling up to 11 months and scrolling 42 years OR just type 8 numeric values?


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Your current approach sounds fine, except that if the user presses the back button or navigates elsewhere while the app continues to work in the background, and the user is doing something important like sending money, the user needs some way to see the status of the background work. A notification would probably be a good choice. Add the notification when ...



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