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1

To answer your question, I don't think suchs statistic exists. And if it exists, chances are the number will be quite irrelevant, since you're talking about exceptions (and I'm one of those exceptions, as we are at it). Besides, what about those users that have mixed language software? For example, some in english, some in Spanish, how would the statistics ...


2

Consider the reasons why some people set their phone to a certain language. For example, I'm a native Dutch speaker from Belgium, and I configured my phone to English because Dutch translations are usually quite poor. In addition, English is very useful for support, because the vast majority of support tutorials are written in English, using English ...


0

I like the accordion-style section, having a scrollable text box appear below a selected LED, pushing content below down the page. Have you considered a simple detail viewer? It takes up more room, which is not always desirable, but would help with the data density problem.


0

How about expandable list that just covers the labels of the latter 3 buttons? Chances are, when the user is interacting with the LED portion, they're little bit interested in the other sections. A little transparency effect can give the user the sense that those are still there.


0

If you use a gesture differently than most other apps, you'll have trouble with initial user uptake - they'll install your app, fail to use it (because they expect it to work like other things on the system), and a large percentage will drop it because they can't make it work instantly. These are learned behaviors, but they do NOT exist in a vacuum - if ...


0

Both options are learned behaviors. I wouldn't think one is better than the other (perhaps A/B testing would give you valuable information?) but none that neither behavior will be immediately understood without teaching the user first.


0

Instagram has solved this problem - press briefly to comment on the right; to share the second button pops up action - showing that there are other buttons - once presses the second and eventually will use swipe - they are more friendly to man than the long press - holding, I feel out of date You can find a compromise and use both options


1

The normal User Experience convention would say that the long press is better because (almost) all the other messengers are using the same thing. But, I am always against the long press option, it holds the user for a few seconds for what he/she was trying to achieve. So, the deciding factor should be, If you do not want your users to waste your time (a ...


0

I think long press better because other messengers such as WhatsApp, using long press action too and users know about long press when they using their phones.


3

If you're worried about Android's standards (which right now is Material Design), then you're using cards in a wrong way. This is why you're facing these issues. Here's from Material Design page: When to use Use a card layout when displaying content that: As a collection, comprises multiple data types (for example, the card collection ...


0

Android has default notifications called snackbar to show stuff like this. Here's the pattern visually: http://www.google.com/design/spec/components/snackbars-toasts.html#snackbars-toasts-usage and for the coders: https://developer.android.com/reference/android/support/design/widget/Snackbar.html


0

You really should use Androids notifications as Android uses will be familiar with getting their notifications this way. Nielsen usability heuristics suggest that you follow: "Consistency and standards; Users should not have to wonder whether different words, situations, or actions mean the same thing. Follow platform conventions."


0

It would seem to me that the bell icon is fairly common for "notifications/alerts". Not quite sure why it was adopted as such, but one theory could be that bells have historically been tied to either time notifications [(church bells or clock towers)][1], warnings, or event kick-off. Might be a bit more abstracted these days, like showing a floppy disk for a ...


0

You can : Add a row for the page on the top, with the page title and creation time or whatever, then use long press to edit or delete like you do with the others rows , look at this data table Use an "edit" floating button that take you to a page or a dialog where you can find the delete option Don't follow the guidelines. Not even Google follow them all ...


2

Material design definitely does have guidelines for lists, @Jonas. In short, the answer is typography and consistent spacing. There are also guidelines for dialogues.


0

I would form clickable / tapable groups of the characteristics. On tapping the area expands and shows the details. And a second tap could retract the details again. This way you can compactly and logically display a lot of information. You should not enforce landscape because many people like to hold their phone or tablet in portrait. Leave the choise to ...


1

If the element is clickable, make it noticeable and get rid of any uncertainty about the affordance of the given element. In order to achieve this, you can try different options: use a floating button action as trigger: this is the Google Material approach, so it's meant for Android, and it visually helps the user to clearly understand what is a header ...


2

Yik Yak's recent update, known as "My Herd" (formerly basecamp), was implemented using hierarchical tabs. As you can see in the header, users can differentiate between "New" and "Hot", then "Nearby" and "My Herd" below. Although this is an iOS example, I believe it captures the functionality you are looking for.


0

It's very important to consider In-App feedback to communicate directly with users, without them getting away from the app to send an email or tweet the problem. This will enable you to: 1) Two-way communication with users to know what's working and what's not. 2) Save time collecting feedback to continuously iterate and enhance your app.


0

You could just use a different visual metaphor to differentiate the two. Use traditional navigation tabs on the main page, and something like a toggle switch on the feed sub-page. Functionally the same as tabs, but using a toggle will differentiate the two in the mind of the users. In this case, tabs are to get to content, and the toggle is to switch ...


4

Yes and no. In general the game's UI should be custom-tailored to the game rather than using generic platform-wide styles that don't really fit in. For example, most of the modern minimalistic styles seek to look futuristic and sleek. Hence, they would feel really out of place in games set in the middle ages where the purpose is to look and feel old, not ...



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