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0

The ActionSheetPicker library seems to do this pretty well.


0

Normally, I might suggest both, as there is no harm giving the user extra help.... However, what you really need is to increase the visibility of the button so that it cannot be missed by anyone wanting extra detail. This is much clearer than the arrow at the top, the purpose of which is not obvious. It could conceiveably: take you to a screen with ...


0

It sounds like you've answer your own question: How to indicate specific sections of a page can be swiped addresses a broader question. The suggestions on that page are excellent but they would result in a lot of noise if repeated for many items on a list. They are also more appropriate when swiping part of a page results in a larger change in ...


0

I suggest using multiple activities. You could check the form after every activity and make elements bigger which makes your UX better. This way there could be +/- 5 inputs in one activity. Once done the user could click on a nice big next button. (Since they have never used android before this makes it easier.) The activity then checks the data and if ...


4

I've found this article by Vedran Arnautovic very interesting and informative. According to the author's research these are the main reasons "why card based interaction patterns work and what makes them attractive to users": Cards support our limited working memory by allowing us to break up information through the process of chunking and focus on ...


3

If the question is taken at face value, i.e. strictly a choice between the →/↓ arrows or the +/- signs, then I suggest using arrows. Arrows denote the direction and a sense of movement to another place or view. +/- signs could be construed as meaning add / remove. For example it looks like I can add a manufacturer, or add an Extra item. While, the minus ...


4

What about using progressive disclosure. So when the user clicks on the checkbox you display the input field. This way you will only display the fields when they are needed and use of animation will catch users attention. Other option is removing checkboxes and asking the user to fill out one of the input fields. Please select one of the alternative ...


0

Swarm has a solid branding reason, as shown above, and there are surely a couple who use it for a futuristic feeling, but for most sites, it boils down to novelty. It may feel more exciting, like when sites started using circles rather than squares to contain faces. (To be fair, there's a iffy but real case for circles as more humane.) But there's nothing ...


5

As for the UX aspect of this question, I'm going to have to say I very much doubt their effectiveness. If anything, perhaps it's because they cut off a slightly smaller part of the image within the same square dimensions: Having said that, I'm pretty sure Swarm's reason for using hexagons relates to their branding, which draws from nature's very own ...


2

I was wondering where and how in the app should I explain what the app does You put that in the description of the app store, not the app itself. If the user has installed the app they know what it does. The Facebook app doesn't have a "what's Facebook" section, or a "what do you use Facebook for" section. and what the output means? Ideally, you ...


1

I would not overdo it. Just add to the map (or in the menu) a "Home" button that centers your map in the desired area. PROs: Easy to implement and understand. The user still has the full functionality of the map if he wants, for example, see how far point B in France is from his house in Munich. Flexible and expandible (want to use the app for several ...


0

The contact-editing style would seem appropriate if there was also meta data or other file content to edit. But if the files or metadata are not typically edited within your app, then presenting a delete or trash button along side share etc seems appropriate (as long as there is a confirmation dialog). Google Drive, for example, has a "Remove" button with ...


2

I recommend muting the map by greying it out and reducing the amount of information it displays beyond France. If the navigation is suddenly disabled for a user exploring the map beyond France, there is a chance the user will interpret it as a bug and close the application. Furthermore, what happens for the user who loads the map in another country? Is ...


4

You can restrict the map in a tricky way. When user goes out of the target area, the map shows in some way it's no more useful for them. This could be fading out effect, blurring and desatiration, etc., see the picture below: Another option is to create tension while dragging out of the target area. Compare this to the last slide signifier in the sliding ...


0

I can tell that you're an iOS user. Android users are conditioned by the OS to explore. Android users will also understand that "Login" and "Register" are not just random words on the screen, but two actions they may choose to execute. Notice how google does not use anything in particular to make their settings items appear touchable: The reason why ...


0

I would suggest an Expandable List View in addition to tabs: So, you'd use the tabs to let the user select the section, and represent the subsections with group headers in an ExpandableListView. Now, if your data does not lend itself to this kind of segmentation, I'd suggest a section landing page, or default to one and let the user change it in the ...


1

For the main sections you could use a spinner navigation in the Action Bar. So the active/visible section would display as a spinner rather than a static title. The sub sections would make sense to remain as tabs as you have mocked up. This pattern is seen in many apps including a few Google ones. Spinners ...


0

There is an option on android that affect this behavior. Under Developer options there is the option "Do not keep activities" If this is checked, then app instances are destroyed when they loose visability Drove me crazy for a while, beieve me.


1

This depends on the both the frequency of the action and your provided fallback options. If deleting a file is a common task, then go ahead and display it upfront, if it's a task that is quite uncommon (e.g. as deleting a contact) then it's ok to require a bit more effort. Just be sure not to hide the button from the user, i.e. the user should always be ...


0

Taps are easy to do accidentally. A good swipe with some kind of tangible feedback (maybe a vibration) would help for getting a solid confirmation that you recorded the point, even if you don't look down. So I would use swiping, and focus on horizontal instead of vertical (right to add to right player, left to add to left player). To take away a point you ...


0

1) Wireframes should NEVER be pixel perfect. 2) When designing apps for multiple screens, design with room for "play" so that small differences between screen sizes don't affect your design. So no - no pixel accurate positioning of elements unless your short-term goal is to reside in an asylum. 3) Pick 3 of the more common Android resolutions. Assume your ...


1

N.B.: I'm assuming this app is backed up by a database on a server. If it's not, please read 'server-side script' as 'separate process' or 'other method' as appropriate. What you're going to need here is a mixture. I recommend methods 3 and 4 that you already have. I don't know how you're displaying the entities but I'm going to assume it's in a list with ...


0

I would have the Delete button open a dialog box (modal window) that has a confirm message (if Delete is enabled) or a 'Sorry but you cannot delete this' message (if Delete is disabled). Disabling the button is also a good choice, you could communicate why it's disabled with a tooltip on hover. Didn't notice OP is discussing an Android application.


2

First off, wireframes are not high-fidelity screens, so striving pixel perfection should not be the main goal. Having said that, Android screens are dependant on size as well as density. Reading up on Google's screen support page should help clarify. Having developed for Android before, it's more important to create a basic layout, than to achieve total ...


1

The bottom bar (also known as split action bar) is used in the cases where you have too many items for your action bar and the UI space is limited. EDIT: Do not forget that if you let the system handle the split action bar, it will hide it completely if all icons 'fit' in the topbar (usually in tablets and bigger screens) More info here : ...


0

You have talked about what you want the user to do, but you haven't described it in terms of what your user actually wants to accomplish. Your user does not want to input anything. They might have to input something as a means to their end. You haven't described their end. "A summary of stock performance over time" also isn't the user's goal. It might ...


1

One of the first things to do when attempting to design a UI is to determine what information you need to display to the user, and I know this sounds like a no-brainer, but it's actually a very important step. Once you have a list of this (for you something like "stocks, return, time period, etc.") you can begin to see how the different data sets or ...



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