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2

Skeuomorphism was a defining characteristic of iOS until last year's release of "flat" iOS7. A quick Google search for iOS6 vs iOS7 flat design returns tons of design articles, comparisons, gripes, rants, etc. The images tab of that search has lots of side-by-side examples. Some key differences include reduction (or outright elimination) of depth cues like ...


1

Object-oriented actions In all examples of Material Design that implement the floating action button, we've seen an object-oriented concept at play within apps: Email (Inbox) Document (Docs/Drive) News (Newsstand) Direction (Maps) Arguably the concept of a singular most important action creates a nicely hierarchy of user actions surrounding the key ...


2

It's hard to say one way or the other. We can list pros and cons and offer opinions but at the end of the day, it's going to be heavily opinion based. All that said, do be careful of judging screen shots. A big hurdle we in UX have to face is feedback coming to us based on static documentation...wireframes, mockups, screen shots, etc. None of these provide ...


7

It's tempting to say that because we're not used to it, it must not be a good experience. I think we mean that change is necessarily a good experience... it's not comfortable, but the end result may actually be better than what we had before. We are used to toolbars, but how often do we get lost in menus or confused by a row of buttons? The single floating ...


0

The question is old but the reply should be taken from the new Android Material Desgin guidelines, errors section: http://www.google.com/design/spec/patterns/errors.html


2

There is a way to go forward for updated version of chrome in android. I verified on my Android 4.4.2 (device Nexus 4 but I doubt device matters) Open a link and tap back. Then press settings button you will see a forward arrow enabled. If you haven't tapped back the arrow is disabled Source: ...


1

In some cases I could see it blending in with whatever's behind it, which would be a bad thing. People who are left-handed could still potentially have to change how they're holding their device in order to press the button since it may be out-of-reach, depending on how far they can reach with their thumb.


5

The good: Fitt's Law: The bad: The biggest flaw in Google's Material design resides in feedback when you press a button. In the physical world a pressed button recedes into the background; in Google's Lollipop the opposite happens, when you press a button, it floats, which is contrary to what the user is accostumed to.


0

http://developer.android.com/design/patterns/pure-android.html Pure Android design guidelines mention not to use bottom tabs for navigation. Another reason not to prefer use of bottom bars in Android is due to its close proximity to device navigation buttons. It could lead to accidental taps. For a single primary button I think it is a good idea to use a ...


-1

As you are creating a custom app ,Account setting can be placed in the menu itself .It helps user to access the account setting at any time with few taps .


0

This question made me think and revisit some of the apps using this pattern to look specifically for any Usability issues. Some more include - Facebook Messenger, Tumblr, Swarm by Foursquare. When I had first seen these apps they seemed odd to me as an Android UX designer who is aware of Android guidelines. But I don't think they pose any major usability ...


0

If you use Googles Android Apps as an example they integrate their settings into multiple levels EG top level Settings select: 'Settings' -> lists: "General Settings, Account Settings (xxx@gmail.com), About". More info on Android design patterns for settings: http://developer.android.com/design/patterns/settings.html


0

I think this depends entirely on how you want users to behave, and whether or not they are likely to select the option when navigating through different screens of the app. If users are likely to only need it on one screen, the floating would be nice as they user will be able to see more content. But if the user is navigating through the app, it's probably ...


1

Depending on which version of Android you are targeting, you will want to look to different style guides. Upcoming Android versions will follow Material Design. Definitely check this out as you go further into developing for Android. Also, check out Android's overall design guide. In brief, Material Design focuses on controlled use of bold colors, ...


0

dThe first rule of navigation is that when you hide information, its usability declines precipitously. This rule becomes exaggerated when we are talking about navigation clicks (mobile) as opposed to hovers (desktop). So the TL;DR version is - no it's not a very good idea in most cases. Let's start easy - where is it okay to have deep nesting, even in ...


0

Key consideration is that material design is a (multi) platform UI. This is not an application UI. As such there are a few considerations specification can reasonably set paradigms that users will be expected learn ability for a single UI approach to scale to large and/or complex navigation requirements means that more applications can fit within the ...


2

Looking at your hierarchy tree I'd say that it could be easily transfered over to a similar hierarchy that is used in the Google Play app. There you have a Home with in line entry points to the Main areas (Eg. Apps, Games, Music, etc..). Under each Main area you have tabs to list content within that area in different fashions (Eg. Categories, Best ...


0

The hamburger menu is a bit lazy because there are other methods to get to the menu and most apps don't really need an overflow option set. A good example of an app that does? Chrome, because it has 14 functions built into the one menu. For an app like Chrome where there's a ton of functionality but 99% of users need to access exactly 1% of them daily on ...


1

This isn't necessarily a problem with a hidden menu, more the information architecture of the site possibly. This might not matter as much as we once thought, with the "three click rule" - http://uxmyths.com/post/654026581/myth-all-pages-should-be-accessible-in-3-clicks The hamburger icon is beginning to become recognisable, this question is useful - Has ...


0

The hamburger isn't intended to show where you are, and just about every mobile website and app uses it as the menu icon, so it's very easily identifiable. To show a user where they are, you can use breadcrumbs. Twice as many taps versus what? If you're referring to a desktop menu that's a yes and no, depending on it it has drop downs etc.


5

You shouldn't do that. The back button is a navigation element. Check the Core App Quality Guide, and especially the Back Navigation Guide. Android users will expect the button to navigate back. If you want an undo, add an action to the action bar or provide it via a popup (http://developer.android.com/design/patterns/confirming-acknowledging.html)


3

No, it is not ok. From the Android Developer Guidelines, Providing Proper Back Navigation: Back navigation is how users move backward through the history of screens they previously visited. All Android devices provide a Back button for this type of navigation, so your app should not add a Back button to the UI. Android has a clear use pattern for the ...


4

It depends a bit on the type of app you are developing, but first let's assume a rather standard productivity based app. My concern is that we will be offering design patterns to the user which might be unfamiliar to them compared to the ones they are used to on their native OS. Good concern. Doing so will piss your users off and give your competitors ...


2

In the Iconography > Action Bar section of Android Design Guidelines you can find this: In the same section you can download the "Action Bar Icon Pack". It contains the "Navigation Drawer Indicator" icon files (i.e., the hamburger icon). I think we can therefore assume the guidelines apply to that icon, too.



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