Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I'd say it's within the guidelines. The Google and Play Store apps both show the hamburger button inside the search bar.


0

Write the code such that your build has a flag that switches URLs. Only release your build to yourself.


1

The Android docs provide some guideance around toasts, notifications and dialogs. The main difference between toasts and dialogs is that toasts provide feedback unobtrusively whereas dialogs demand an immediate response. Toasts A toast provides simple feedback about an operation in a small popup. It only fills the amount of space required for the ...


0

If considering Multiple apps for permissions then optimise structure for realistic User concerns. Any reasonable* user that permits "INTERNET" access to an app will also permit "ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE". Thus, if willing to install the core app "FooMail" they would find an option of adding "FooMail: Background Sync" quite peculiar. Then, at face value ...


1

Installing 4 apps to do 1 thing is bad UX App Overload is a real thing and people are more hesitant to put things on their phone in general. If you require multiple app downloads before the user can complete their task at hand then many people won't bother or even worse may download the core app only to find out it doesn't work without 3 other apps at ...


3

This page on the developer.android.com website shows that Lollipop now has a marketshare of 5.4% over all Android versions. According to this page, material design will work on Android 5.0 (API 21) or higher only. That said, it would not be smart to focus on such a small group only. What you can do is check the current API level of the user's phone, and ...


1

Material Design has no flat rectangular buttons The Material Design guidelines specify that rectangular colored need to be raised to prevent exactly the kind of confusion you are encountering. Otherwise it's not clear to the user that the button is an interactive element (can be pressed). You can add a drop shadow to make the buttons raised and compliant ...


1

If you're using Material, then the answer is in Material itself. See http://www.google.com/design/spec/components/list-controls.html#list-controls-types-of-list-controls and specifically the "Expand/collapse" section. Also, as we're using Material, remember to set a Primary color and an accent color, then build your palette by adding white or black to that ...


0

Treat each value as a floating panel. On click, expand a panel on a lower z-axis, with the related information. use the standard navigation to back


1

If the default is to show the contextual help and then you give the user the option to turn the help off then the first option "put this settings in the navigation drawer, with a simple on/off switch" should work very well. The user was aware that there was contextual help and turned it off. If you want to go one extra step, after the user selects "turn off ...


0

I wouldn't create an entire Settings-view, just for a single Switch. Also, placing it in the navigation drawer is a strange place to put it (atleast, I've never seen it before). If it is possible for your app, and it is clear enough for your users, you could consider placing the Switch in the Actionbar.


0

I like Facebook's pattern: Mine would probably be to just change the text from Like to On. See a more complete answer here.


0

There is no such pattern in Android, but, Android allows you to modify existing UI-elements. Check out this article. You would have to create 2 "button/togglebutton-combination" where it's clear whether it's selected or not. It's the same as the article I referenced to, except your images would be different :)


1

I guess as per the new material design guidelines, they even some dimensions about the same. I hope you were looking for the same.


0

Interesting question. If your user expects to perform more than one action on the filter box then auto closing should be avoided. Here is a related article in Smashing Magazine. Although the screenshots they have provided are somewhat dated, I would suggest the filter drawer as a concept. On closing of such a drawer data can refresh according to new filter ...


0

This answer assumes you want an on/off switch to toggle the state of the AC. Sorry if i miss-interpreted the question. I'd recommend the use of an on/off label as this is controlling its running state rather than a setting among many, like 'Silent mode' or similar for your AC. You can localize the label if needed rather than using I|O label. Check the ...


1

As of 2015, there's a de facto document on best design practices for Android: Material Design There's a bit of UX fail in the documentation which they start by introducing cool new stuff like materials and cards, but doesn't start with the basics like layouts and grids. So you might have to flip from the back. Much of it involves feedback. Animations ...


1

While the guidelines don't state anything about reverting the state of a Floating Action Menu triggered by a Floating Action Button, two patterns have become prominent in this use case, and rightly so: The Floating Action Menu in Inbox fades in a translucent white overlay over the rest of the content, drawing focus towards the menu. While the rest of the ...


0

In this case, the intention to add a contact has already been signalled, and the next logical step would be entering text. I feel the 'stock' approach is best here, have the name field focussed, and the keyboard should be opened up. As Mahijeet says, it is obvious that the user will fill in information.



Top 50 recent answers are included