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21

I've seen chevrons become popular for things like this. Big fat areas that are easy to press, along side footers with an ellipse. Pretty familiar symbols that imply expandable content without having to read.


14

"show more" link (near the bottom) The easiest and clearest way to do this is with a clearly labeled link... show more If the link is there then I know there is stuff not showing. "expand card / collapse card" link (in the upper right corner) If you think your users will want to both show and hide the additional content then make sure the link to do ...


6

For Material Design, it should slide out from under the header bar. The reason is: the user may be sliding down from anywhere on the screen, so there is no spatial connection between the interaction and the icon. For this interaction, the ENTIRE spatial connection comes from the sliding movement, which is why the movement of the refresh icon has to mimic ...


4

Add text for clarity and images for quick recognition UX is more about solving problems and making things easier for people and not about pretty icons. Images should enhance an already functional UI. Although this may be way off base from what your application is trying to do this would be more intuitive to first time users...


3

On Android this is also very common pattern but with few differences. On Android you position this tabs on top of the screen (mainly because of hardware buttons on the bottom of the phone) You can use scrollable or fixed tabs (for more info: http://developer.android.com/design/building-blocks/tabs.html)


3

It all depends on the app itself and users' expectations. For instance, users expect Facebook's desktop website to always show: Friend requests Their messages New notifications The other options are hidden in menus and sub-menus. So, it's a logical step for Facebook to match the desktop version with the app. If you have the screen space to place the ...


2

The below would work (plus sign could be moved to right or left to the content). Moreover, you mentioned the list as "cards" so if you want to trigger the expand/collapse on the touch of the entire card, this will be prominent enough. Code pen below http://codepen.io/pdjarratt/full/miswr/


2

I've voted up DaveAlger's post because I think it's the most straightforward and it's clear. I thought I'd mention an idea I had whilst considering this. It appears from the proportions of your mock up that it's a phone/touch application. I had an imagine of a zip horizontally on each card that allowed dragging the fastener across to open the zip and reveal ...


1

On iOS the background of the status bar is the same color as the navigation bar (iOS 7+). Or to be more correct, the status bar has a transparent background, and the content of the app covers the screen area under the status bar. Since the menu in Gmail (and often in apps in general) has another color, it looks weird to have the status bar with a completely ...


1

If you're talking about the hamburger icon and the "me", the way to break the table appearance of your screen is to swap everything around: Put the magenta camera icon on the left and the "Me" to the left of the hamburger (menu) icon which would be on the far right. Edit after feedback about my misunderstanding of the question You are asking what will make ...


1

Like most things, there is no magic bullet solution. Leveraging standards, for better or worse, can guide you down an established direction. Your users are likely have seen and possibly gotten acquainted with the following: Android Design Guidelines, Google Multi-Screen Resources, Apple HIG and W3C Mobile Web Application Guidelines. Let established ...


1

I always do this manually as it is hard to find a balance between something that has enough tonal and visual contrast, but still is WCAG 2.0 level AA color contrast compliant. The bootstrap buttons are always a good starting point for getting a feel for tonal differences http://getbootstrap.com/css/#buttons Color wheel is a useful tool ...


1

A term that comes to mind is panel or pane, but looking at your "web application” it looks more like a website to me. The fact that it loads pages dynamically and slides them in doesn’t mean people will see it as an application, that depends more on it’s contents. So I think the term page will be generally understood in this case.


1

I would word it as "Choose section", which indicates a grouping of a given content type which is likely to include "pages" in the content. There is no hard and fast rule on this, so I would strongly suggest doing some basic UX testing with your potential customers to see which is more intuitive to them.


1

I am afraid that the UX world depends on which your users are and therefore the true answer is that there are no solutions to your problem. There are only costs and benefits on choosing either one design or the other but this depends on the users. You should get in touch with them by doing ux research in order to get the proper insights that will guide your ...


1

There's another approach you could take. Lets take an example. If notification A comes at 10 AM and notification B comes at 10 30 AM and notification C comes at 11 AM. Let's say that user accesses his/her phone at 11 30 AM. You can essentially display the notifications in 2 ways : Display the latest notification. When the user taps the ...


1

I agree with @Jacktionman that you should provide an option for your users to choose between the behaviours; however I would say that if you're going to mandate one you should stick to separate notifications. The problem is that while consolidated notifications might look prettier they convey less information to the user, and may force him to undertake ...


1

Please, please summarise them into one notification. It's stressful to see the notification bar full and have to deal with that many separate notifications. It's claustrophobic in there, as the bar isn't well designed for that many pieces of information. UX Claustrophobia is a real thing! Could you use Android's notification setting to give people two ...


1

Tabs indicate that there are different views of related information that can be swapped between at any time. Showing tabs and not allowing them to be used adds cognitive friction. I wouldn't show the tabs at all until after a selection is made on the first screen. Be sure to keep the first screen as simple as possible and only ask for the minimum amount ...


1

The motive behind using wizards is to keep the user engaged without allowing him to go out of the process until and unless he/she completes the desired task. This is achieved by limiting his access to other actions, functionality available to him normally. In such cases pop-up wizards would serve the purpose efficiently in most of the cases. But, since this ...


1

Yes, you should use the up button. It may “look like a back button” on Lollipop, specially if you’ve seen iOS, but the behavior is still the same, it didn’t change. Check the Play Store app, for example. It is important to remember that the aesthetics of the back button on Android itself also changed, it is now a triangle, so they are not really similar ...



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