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27

For Buttons I would strongly recommend looking at this excellent example which converts the button into an form submission indicator as well. Here are a couple more resources you might find interesting too which show relevant progress buttons Ladda Loda Buttons However if you are concerned about users trying to interact the button, you can always ...


22

I guess this should follow the classic usability guidelines for response time. 0.1 second is about the limit for having the user feel that the system is reacting instantaneously, meaning that no special feedback is necessary except to display the result. 1.0 second is about the limit for the user's flow of thought to stay uninterrupted, even ...


14

In general, users expect links to link and command buttons to command. That is, links navigate, presenting new content without changing the underlying data objects or their relations or positions. Buttons change these things, performing creation, deletion, association, conversion, duplication, etc. An easy rule-of-thumb is if the most terse caption for the ...


12

You can disable the save button when there is nothing to be saved. You can also change its label from Save to Saved.


10

I've always been told that a delay of 100ms is generally not perceivable. An answer in a similar StackOverflow thread says: The 100 ms threshold was established over 30 yrs ago. See: Card, S. K., Robertson, G. G., and Mackinlay, J. D. (1991). The information visualizer: An information workspace. Proc. ACM CHI'91 Conf. (New Orleans, LA, 28 April-2 ...


10

Secondary rank If you have another factor that can rank the results (e.g. "popularity", "kuakeli rank"): start with the first letter limit results by second rank, by picking the TOP N (roughly: SELECT TOP 10 FROM Stuff WHERE Name LIKE "x*" ORDER BY Rank) If you don't have that rank, you could still start after the first letter, but results aren't as ...


9

"1.0 second is about the limit for the user’s flow of thought to stay uninterrupted, even though the user will notice the delay. Normally, no special feedback is necessary during delays of more than 0.1 but less than 1.0 second, but the user does lose the feeling of operating directly on the data." (See reference 2 below) I'd say, if a page needs more than ...


9

It all depends on what your web application is supposed to do and how much of your site is changing on every page. if there's a small section of your site that's supposed to change, AJAX is your best option if a large piece of your site is changing (for example, only the navigation and footer are the same on all of your pages), then you should probably go ...


8

Does the user need all the parts to be loaded to use the page effectively ? If so, then going with the approach of loading parts separately might not be a good experience as users might want to interact with these parts and find that they can only partially interact or not interact at all might ruin the user experience. However if you can interact with the ...


6

If for some reason there is an error, it might not be seen by someone moving really quickly through the control panel. To solve that, use frames in your website, so that there is a constant parent frame and 'top bar'. That can be a place for a loss-of-communication indicator. AJAX to the server can be made to go via that parent frame. This ...


6

I like progress bars with stepped copy. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


5

You can also use transitory status notification bars at the top of the screen. These would slide into view upon AJAX success, and then fade out after a very few seconds. These would also be anchored to the top edge of the window, as distinct from the top of the actual page itself. This means they'd still be visible even if the user had scrolled down the ...


5

IMO the first gives the best overall impression of UI responsiveness and understanding of the user's intent, (e.g., I've reconfigured the screen in anticipation to display the data you've requested). The second option could potentially be interpreted as something less favorable like Please wait while I figure out what exactly it is you want me to do. In ...


5

There are some great ideas here for what to display during that 4 - 5 second period. But that period doesn't have to exist at all. The only thing that you really need to process immediately is the information that's going to be displayed on the next page load. Everything else can be offloaded to a background process. This approach would eliminate the need to ...


5

The answer is to validate in each tier so that you always ensure data integrity. This protects you against the scenario where any of the prior tier validations were skipped. I can't stand when developers build methods that assume the data has already be validated. Let's take the following scenario where your tiers are: Client Server Service Database ...


4

After some discussion in the chat with @BenBrocka, it seems as if you've answered your own question. There's nothing about RIAs that distinguish them from normal user interaction, so any guidelines on good/simple UI Design should apply. The reason Android (and similar devices) have "best practices" specifically for them is twofold: 1) they use a different ...


4

@Barfieldmvs response is probably the right way to go about it - show an "updating" state while the ajax call is in progress, and clear this when there is a successfull ( or failed ) response back. The advantage of this is that, should the ajax call die without any form of response, there is a clear indication that something is wrong, as the "updating" state ...


4

I don't think enabling rearranging the menu items is worthwhile. There are many reasons why (I think) this isn't a good idea but 2 main ones are: 1) It's a feature that's not really necessary, so it enlarges the UI for not much return on investment (investment in design, implementation, documentation, and user learning). 2) It allows the user to lock ...


4

Don't waste user's time just because the visuals look good. 2 seconds is plenty of time to frustrate the user if it happens every time - and will make the site appear really slow because nothing appears to happen fast. It's important to provide feedback and confirmation of completion - but not to fake it like that. In any case, a lightbox is a distraction ...


4

What you're trying to do is provide visual feedback that: the user clicked the button, you've received that click, and magic is happening to deliver the results. Disabling the button achieved the first two goals. The items Mervin lists off are good ways to achieve the third goal. The simplest response is disable the button after it has been clicked ...


4

From a UX standpoint I think AJAX is going to be better 100% of the time IF you can provide ALL of the proper visual cues that the form is processing and not just giving the illusion of being broken. Some things to consider are: Provide a visual spinner within the <button>Submit <img src="spinner.gif"></button> and make sure to remove it ...


3

The information should load as fast as possible. the important thing is while they are waiting for the real action you should give them some "loading..." sign so the user knows that the action worked. It's really annoying to click a link and not see anything happen.


3

I always build my applications with the philosophy of progressive enhancement. In your case, I would design your site so that the site works for users without javascript and HTML5 enabled. This will result in a full reload of the whole page everytime the user navigates, but this is fine. This represents the normal 'state-of-flow' of the web and users should ...


3

Generally speaking, if it looks like a link, I expect it to load a new page of content from a different URL. Sometimes it will change my focus within the current document (i.e. href="#fragment") which is not too much of a problem, so long as it's obvious. If it looks like a standard button (i.e. the same as my OS's standard button), I expect it to have the ...


3

Pattern libraries are great for discovering how other people think about problems, and showcase their solutions. They won't always have results, but it'll be more effective than asking for examples on a UX Q&A site. A quick search on Dribbble: http://dribbble.com/tags/loading Here's an example result for Flight Tracker: ...


3

Users on general wouldn't know the difference between a javascript-library-enabled partial undisclosure of an element and a refresh of the page. There are no conventions around for letting the user know the difference. And I agree, with todays heavy web apps which takes three four seconds to load, it really would be useful to know the difference. Or not. ...


3

In my opinion refreshing the page will not cause confusion because users tend to associate page refresh with updating information. If you like to make sure that users understand the situation clearly, instead of showing them a message "This page will refresh in a few seconds to finish the update", I'd show them a message after the refresh "Your Spouse was ...


3

It bears being said: The reason to stick with it is because it is the standard, and standards are empowering. A 'browser' is a complex class creature. It includes screen readers and other systems for non-standard display. If you haven't read what Accessibility is about, check chapter 3 of the Government usability guidelines Remember that ...


2

Have you considered jqueryui? They have a CSS theme generator that's been a good starting point for me. http://jqueryui.com/themeroller/


2

In my opinion the third option is to not obstruct the usage of the site at all. Why is it necessary to keep the user from typing on while auto-saving the data or to revert changes made while saving? From a usability point of view it would probably be the best idea to auto-save in the background, maybe having an indicator about save-status and progress ...



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