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84

Users generally do prefer targeted ads to untargeted ones, all other things being equal. However, there are other important factors which explain why user reaction is mostly negative overall: Users don't spend all their time purchasing goods on the internet - often they are doing different and completely unrelated tasks, sometimes at the same time. Most ...


35

Well, from a pure User Experience point-of-view, no adverts at all would be better - you can use the full screen real-estate to present more content, plus you won't be annoying the user in that special way that in-your-face adverts have a habit of doing. Aside from advertising, how else does the user know they're using the trial version? Do they get email ...


24

Pop-unders suck. The Internet has been awash with hate for them since their inception. But you know that, you need data. Research has shown that pop-under ads are almost indistinguishable from pop-up ads (pdf source), and are actually worse than pop-up ads in terms of intrusiveness in tests vs in-line ads. Emphasis mine: Pop-under ads were ...


17

This has something to do with a shift in emphasis from push to pull advertising/marketing. There is loads of evidence to show that people's favourite way to learn about new things is by word of mouth - they ask their pals or read reviews from trusted sources. In fact this has turned into a whole branch of marketing (WOMMA). Permission Marketing is another ...


16

Just have a stock 'advert' that advertises your Pro version and show that in place of the advert block when no connection is present. The experience is then the same/very similar whether there is an internet connection or not.


14

This kind of change typically need A/B testing before making a decision. First thing, some people simply do not give, so do not lose time with them. Therefore you have to focus on people that donate. Help them ! Give them 4 choices and a pre-selected one : download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups People who want to give ...


11

Every time I have seen them, they have been poorly done and looked suspicious to me. I just assume that there is something sinister going on like key logging or something like that (not even sure if that's possible but I err on the side of caution). I often think that the reason they are behind the window is so that they can do whatever they need to do ...


10

Pop up notifications, like the ones used in Gmail and here on StackExchange might be a good way to get your message across. The method used on StackExchange is especially relevant because it offers information that is site specific, and often how to make ones experience on the StackExchange better. Since your message: "You were looking for XY, if ...


10

There's a lot of marketing chatter on this topic but there is one main thing to consider; which sounds like the more attractive deal in your * specific case*? There's an interesting Donut Hole graph from Dealicacy Showing how both can offer better value to the consumer: The relative (%) benefit remains constant, while the absolute benefit ($ off) has a ...


10

Human brains function as if all interactions are with live people. If browsing the internet is like asking a group of people questions and having them give you answers, what would you feel if a stranger butted into the crowd and kept interrupting to ask if you wanted to buy something? Even if it was something you were interested in, it'd be very annoying.


10

Android developer docs has a section titled Advertising Without Compromising User Experience Unfortunately, it only highlights the don't do's rather than the do's: When deciding where to place ads within your application, you should carefully consider user-experience. For example, you don’t want to fill the screen with multiple ads that will quite ...


9

This study seems to address your concerns exactly: http://interruptions.net/literature/McCoy-HCIRMIS04.pdf Here's the abstract: Pop-up, pop-under, and in-line ads have been said to be intrusive, and previous findings suggest that they could have important effects on user perception and cognition. Using a 2x2 factorial design, this experimental ...


9

Seeing targeted ads highlights the fact that your browsing habits are being checked and logged. Many people see this as snooping (who by doesn't matter) and an intrusion on their privacy. For example, you may idly search for some information on something slightly salacious and then get presented with ads for "adult" material when you show your wife/boss ...


8

My preferred approach is this: It's changing the dynamic from it being an advert to it being signposting. In this case you're being signposted to the advert information. This largely overcomes the ad-blindness problem. The most important place to advertise new features is on the page the new feature will be used from. If your acme-data-munger now ...


8

Interestingly... In some research carried out by Doug Schumacher in 2005, he found that having no call to action button increased the click through rate by 27%. The description of the tests describes how it was carried out on two otherwise identical banners with each having nearly 400,000 impressions. But wait - it's not that clear cut! Unfortunately ...


8

Here's three tricks that spring to mind: Create a visual effect of a square torn out of the paper, and show the ad through the hole. This combats banner blindness: the ad is integrated with the design principle, and yet clearly stands out. The visual joke will soften the user's annoyance at seeing an ad. The edges of the ad will be partially obscured, ...


7

So I have Firefox open with twenty tabs, many of them containing articles I want to read later. I then close Firefox, secure in the knowledge that the session is saved and I'll see the same twenty tabs again the next time I open the browser. And now I discover that there's another Firefox window open with your lousy ad in it. And that will be the last window ...


7

Having ads on the top is bad in several ways. They destroy your first impression, make the site slow and cost you in terms of SEO and search-engine ranking. Study about Google Panda release for that. But if you had to put some ads and wanted to avoid clutter, follow something simile which Smashing Magazine has followed. Put all the ads on the extreme ...


6

I can't link to any data or research and I don't see them used very often, probably for good reason. They might not interrupt workflow - in the same way a pop-up might- but they're invisible at the time when the notification is most relevant! I would explore other ways of notifying the user; I'm tempted to recommend some kind of inline validation rule that ...


6

People are very good at ignoring ads where ever you put them. There have been studies done where users eye movements were tracked and they show that they hardly ever look at ads. This study from 2007 shows this very well. If you choose "non-standard" locations for your ads, you might find people look at them to start with, but once they get used to the ...


6

Be honest. Explain to your users how the money will be used and why you want to ask for it. It may help to explain why you are choosing to support the site via donations instead of other channels, like merchandise, affiliate programs, and so on. You might want to take the ads off the site, or at least explain how much money the ads make for you. Users often ...


5

(A) And here I thought the point of an ad was to inform the visitor of products and possibilities he was not aware of but would delighted to explore. Wait... You do understand that trying to trick me all day to click on your ads will make me less likely to return to your page? All of us are idiots some of the time. Leeching on that is cheap. If you are ...


5

Best chance is always the first part of the page they look at, the header(top). Whether or not you actually want to put an ad there probably depends on the content and design of the page. A lot of the time the logo will be on the upper left and you will have some space for an ad on the upper right. Another higher place would be right below the nav. (I'm ...


5

Full page ads on the internet are hated. It's one of the more universal feelings on the internet. I think the issue that you are looking at isn't whether people like them or whether they improve the UX. Ads are used as a revenue source and a necessary evil for many sites. So you need to effectively do a cost benefit analysis (or in this case revenue harm ...


5

Two sites which handle ad-blocking in a way that enhances the user experience are askmrrobot.com and wowhead.com. Not getting all bent out of shape seems to be key. Looking at the html source of these sites it can be seen they don't actually "know" you've blocked ads .. they've just absolute-positioned another div element in the same location underneath ...


5

If you want to do it via Ad banners (leaderboard/sidebar) then I'd style the banners visually consistent with the rest of the site design. This way they'll stand out from the random Ad banners. However, the downside of Ad banners is that most people are conditioned not to look at them regardless, especially on the sidebar(aka junk drawer). Since your goal ...


5

I totally get the "put the business needs first" idea and I'm behind it -- but Obviously, if customers never see any ads, then the business can't make any revinue, and eventually lose the incentive or ability to offer value. In the very same way; if the customer can't find the content they were looking for; the site stops providing them with value, and ...


5

In general you should try to grab your viewer's attention right out the gate and attempt to keep them focused with interesting content throughout. Therefore, I would think it would be better to have an outro for the reason you stated of not inhibiting the viewer's ability to watch the video. One common complaint I always hear is the massive sigh following ...


5

Advert impressions don't have to be based on page views. They can be time based, where the advert is changed every 30 seconds or something like that. That way you can use infinite scrolling and still have the advertising revenue that you want. This is how it usually works on mobile advertising where there is a banner that doesn't necessarily change ...


5

Adding interstitial ads at any point in the hierachy you describe sounds probably isn't ideal. You don't want to interrupt the user journey while they are getting to the content. I assume there would be a way for a user to cycle through jokes (prev/next type functionality) and this would be the best place for those ads. Every X jokes show an ad. In terms ...



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