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14

JIRA, the enterprise ticket management system, recently added the ability to 'Configure Fields' when editing a ticket. This means that all the fields are still readily accessible, but the user only has to see the things they're interested in. They did a couple smart things when they rolled this out. First, they made this setting sticky on a per-user ...


14

One of the factors to be considered in this is performance. If it takes the system a few extra seconds to bring up the complete result set than I would steer away from it. And even if the time it takes to bring up both screens is the same, I would go with Option 1 because the blank table acts as a type of prompt for the user to enter in some sort of search ...


11

Separate buttons. Combining the buttons creates a relationship between the buttons, even though that's not really important. Placing the buttons individually within the element probably does a better job of establishing the relationship between button and item, which is more important. Plus, it means larger target sizes. Fitts' law and all that.


10

In your situation, I like option 2 better. I think what you are really building is a 'Practices View'. Text based search is just one feature of this 'Practices View'. It looks like you have filtering, sorting and a few other features as well. As you mention in your question, option 2 also removes the need for the user to enter a search term before they ...


7

One key to consider - and I think a motivating factor with the move to prohibit access by default instead of permitting it - is the failure mode. Consider, if an administrator fails to configure access for a given user, what happens? For a system that uses "permit by default", the user gets access to too much, perhaps including privileged or confidential ...


6

If there was a normal login button/link I'd say do what Stack Exchange does and simply present the extra link to the admin users once they've logged in. On Stack Exchange high reputation users and moderators get to see extra links that normal users don't. This means that there's no confusion for ordinary users seeing something they don't have - nor would ...


6

When it comes to information security the general rule of thumb is to have everything locked down at first. It has evolved from the early days of internet when the analogy was the opposite. Back then everything was open until it was locked down. This made hacking easy and security breaches where a huge problem. So there were a shift toward having everything ...


5

This is a great user experience question. For icons that represent different tiers of access control across a given set of permissions, it is very appropriate to have them all share a common base element. The respective roles' icons can each then be distinguished on the basis of additional design elements, given each more or less visual "weight" ...


5

I would actually advice you to reconsider including an icon for every singe item in the tree. Now, why do I say that? Well, as you already mention, you already communicate clearly in the tree which role a user has depending on how indented the item is in the tree. Adding more content, showing the exact same information in another way would in this case not ...


5

Think of user as the base user type and everyone assigned to this type is called just user. Admin actually inherits from the user type and gets i.e. more rights and this is why you may call him admin. So if a user is just a user and not a specialization of user type it makes no sense to call him somehow different. Ok, this might be from the view of a ...


5

for a 40+ user group, avoid 'manage' itself. Make the links even more self-explanatory. 'Create New Page' 'Edit a Page' 'Add/Edit Categories' 'Approve/Remove Comments' non-tech savvy ppl have a tendency to get lost in the page structure, so a link called 'Pages' which has links to 'add page' and 'edit page' will add to confusion. Ofc if you have 20+ links ...


5

I would suggest grouping the buttons simply because I find it esthetic, but with one caveat: can you eliminate the up/down arrows? I am assuming that this is for reordering the list item, but in this day and age, users expect to drag the list item. Needing to move the item three rows down means clicking on the down arrow icon, moving the mouse (because the ...


5

I have a similar set up for a test environment and a production environment. I found myself accidentally adding test data to the live database. So I wanted to make sure that it was easy to identify which server I was on. I could glance at the address bar, but it was too easy to forget. I wanted the differences to be minimal but obvious. I chose to add a ...


4

You need separate designs. There's a key difference in users of the consumer site and the users of your internal site: the internal users are likely to be power users - they'll be doing the same tasks a lot, and they'll get very good at learning whatever interface you give them. End users will spend the vast majority of their time using other sites, so will ...


4

I would do something like the below. When editing a user, allow individual (multiple) roles to be selected. For roles that require individual product selection, reveal a list of products. I would include a keyword search/filter to make this easier if the list of products grows much longer. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq ...


4

What's your app about? There is probably some natural term from the domain. For example, if it was a forum that might be "member". For this site we might call ourselves UXers, designers (oh, hell, I've opened a huge can of worms there!). The other thing to think about is roles instead of users. For example, I have an application which has a workflow in ...


4

Well, you're trying to come up with a location which would be prominent to one group of users, and invisible to another group of users - but you have no way of knowing which group the current user belongs to. It seems like this problem has no solution by definition, and you must rely on recall rather than recognition. Creating a link that only admins know is ...


4

There may be a case for it if your target is power users who do little but use this form all day. If not, (which I suspect is the case) I would suggest you split the screens up. Right now, they are fairly confusing, and I can't work out exactly what I would do in each one. It also seems unlikely that someone will need to edit each of these fields every ...


3

This is a good place to use the control-panel pattern, such as in Adobe Illustrator, when you click on a shape object, it will show you the operations you can perform with it in the control panel. Control panel is the E area in this screenshot: So here's what you can do: There's nothing wrong with your last solution except that it's too long with the ...


3

If you were to rename is to "Badges Settings", then I think it'd be perfectly placed within the badges section. All Badges pages will be logically linked through the same navigation. Also consider a site with user permissions that restrict access to each page/section of the site. A full admin will be able to see and access all pages, while a Badge admin ...


3

I would not opt for a separate confirmation pages or dialog boxes because I feel you * punish* a missclick too heavily. Generally I don't like the flash message: what happens when they delete a user wrongfully but for some reason miss the flash message (internet issues, just don't see it). I think you should only take this route if the action can be ...


3

@Jimmy is right about the usability aspect - in terms of Fitts' law it's indeed much preferable to separate the buttons. However, from the visual and cognitive load aspect it may be better to group them in a toolbar. You can see from your own sketches how much visual noise is added when you separate them - instead of one background and X icons you get X ...


2

Privacy Simplicity Content emphasis Speed Consistency Privacy - If not all your content is public, seeing a different page that represents what somebody else would see is reassuring. It decreases people's anxiety that they might accidentally have made something public that was intended to be private or vice versa. Simplicity - Although advanced users ...


2

It has been requested, by the community, to have the option "Install and Restart" option on the Shutdown Event Tracker on Windows Server, however never implemented. Technet@Microsoft says the following of the Shutdown Event Tracker: Shutdown Event Tracker is a tool that prompts users to record a reason why they restart or shut down the computer. This ...


2

I'm going to slightly extrapolate on what dhmholley said regarding knowing your users. While he/she brings up excellent points regarding "casual" users vs. power users and needing to be aware of those differences, I think it is important to keep in mind the shift in the workplace environment as more and more millennials enter the workforce. The millenials ...


2

In my opinion, your administrative user are going to be handful, compared to the end users who are actually going to take the survey, so I would say, concentrate more on the UX of the end users. Again building a custom UX for a handful of admins means doing a lot of extra work. Moreover the admins who as you said are the customers are looking at how the ...


2

By having Installing Updates as an option you would be able to better track how often your servers are being rebooted for updates. From an IT point of view a server being restarted is usually not a good thing. So much so that one of the selling features of Linux (I assume Unix as well?) has always been that it requires less restarts. This is likely one ...


2

From the administrator's point of view, it is useful to have the ability to control the content of the intro text rather than just truncating the full version. This is usually best achieved with two separate fields. I would however suggest that you make the intro field optional and fall back to using the first (e.g.) 100 words of the full article, so that ...


2

An option 1 I see is to use toolbar instead of a separate panel. An option 2 I see is to use context actions, i.e. actions shown near the selected (focused) row (or, maybe, a several rows): So, the "Add child" and "Edit" options will popup a dialog with details to add or change.


2

Some possibilities that come to mind to reduce user confusion would be: Breadcrumbs (eg Global settings > Sub-area settings > Where-you-are-now) at the top of the screen, which I think you're already illustrating in the Sub-Area mockup, but make it very visible Use an Accordion menu on the left-hand side, showing all the top-level areas collapsed, but with ...



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