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34

As a Stack Overflow / Stack Exchange employee, my guess is that this was a Google Forms doc put together for the specific purpose of gathering addresses this one time. We do this internally a lot to gather information. Using a product like Google Forms allows anyone to get something done without having to involve developers or designers. I imagine the ...


18

Though I don't have an answer behind why all the fields were named the same, I think the idea was to ensure that all potential international addresses could fit into the form design without designing custom forms for every international address. Here are some examples of international addresses Amazon also a generic international format as mentioned in ...


14

6-line addresses (or rather 7-line, including the name of the addressee) do occur. Consider for example a typical UK residential address: Miss S Pollard name 1 Chapel Hill building number and street name Heswall locality BOURNEMOUTH town with a post office BH1 1AA postcode UNITED KINGDOM ...


7

The two fields are part of the same address. (I've never heard your colleague's interpretation before.) Usually the second line is optional. As noted by dnbrv and TJH, in some locations the second line is necessary or helpful. In addition, providing the extra line allows for formatting an address to optimize postal delivery, which is largely driven by ...


4

In the U.S., a few years ago when social media was starting to boom, advertisers would often display a logo and state something like "Find us on Facebook" in TV and print media. However they started to realize that fan pages and other non-official profiles made that confusing, so then they started displaying full URL's (i.e., www.facebook.com/CoolCompany) ...


4

The last option, using a single field for type and street is likely the best. That said, let's go through the three options and see where the strengths/weaknesses of each are: The "street" field starts focused; if the user selects something in the drop down then the "street number" is focused ("type" is autofilled); if he tries to move to the next ...


4

It should not. The user counts on you that you do not change his input behind his back. As the user continue to the next field, his focus is now on that only field. Though the fields may be visually close to each other, he might not pay attention that you've changed his previous input. Not to mention that you got it right saying it might annoy him even if ...


4

Try to re-design your form. Form description is too verbose and non-prominent. Header Shipping address is clear and easy for perception. Shipping Address and Mailing address is a bit confusing. Use Address label and placeholder in the field. Narrow address field is perceived as small info container, like email. The real postal addresses are more wider. ...


4

For the address itself, there should be 4 lines as explained on the clear addressing guidelines on the official Royal Mail website (I say for the address itself because there is 4 + 1 line for the addressee's name). EDIT : Some people have pointed out to me that you sometimes need to indicate the house name before the street name, so 5 lines instead of 4 ...


3

(I’m a non-native English speaker.) When I read your question title, I thought: Huh, what’s the difference between "email address" and "mailing address"? For me, "mail address" is a synonym for "email address". And "mailing address" is not that far away from "mail address". I think one of these labels would work better: postal address shipping address ...


3

(I work at SmartyStreets, where we research and experiment with address-related UX.) Country should go first. Then you can customize the appearance of the form, if you wish, for certain countries, so that users will feel more comfortable entering their address. However, going entirely backward from the broadest region type to most narrow isn't the best ...


3

While the order you have mentioned is typical for a specific group of countries, it may be totally different in other ones. In other words, whenever you refer to some specific order, it comes from a popular convention in a specific country (or group of countries). Going against standards (which are parallel to these popular conventions and thus also to user ...


3

The <address> tag is intended to be used for contact information for the author of the nearest <article> or <body> ancestor. Using it to indicate contact information for multiple entities or even a single entity that is not the author of the page is confusing the semantics of the element. This is why we have the microformat hCard. See ...


2

I found quite a detailed reference of mailing address formats from around the world but I'm not sure how up to date it is, so I found also a tool to look up address format by country. Skimming through both, you can notice that the overwhelming majority of countries do need only one line for street address. However, if the destination is a post office (PO) ...


2

It's common in Europe (I'm in UK) too, but usually as an optional field. To give an example of a UK address which requires 2 lines: Apartment 10, Derp House (line 1) 20 Derpstreet (line 2) Derpville (Town) Derptown (City/County) D3 3RP (Postcode) I don't know enough about US addressed but my Canadian address also needed the extra line as I lived in a ...


2

How about a little check mark next to it that indicates it's a valid email address/user account? (See image below)


2

There is nothing more irritating if something goes wrong (temp 404, Wifi blips out etc) and you loose all the address info and card info at the same time. Saving it as you go as well means if someone doesn't complete a sale you can send an automatic email to them asking them if they would like to complete. You will find a huge number of people don't ...


2

It depends on whether or not you need to verify the address. When validation matters If you need to verify the input you need a database of validation rules. But even then, it will be hard to keep track of all possible valid formats and keep in mind that these things are not set in stone and may change at any time. You could think about offering an option ...


2

Just use Address but MOST importantly, right-align your labels and change the width of your labels to match the size of the data you would expect the field to contain. Obviously zip would be less characters than the address field. This allow the eye to anchor on the field size and makes it easier for the user to get their bearings on where they are in the ...


2

Use a text box, then validate the input. I'm a developer at SmartyStreets, where we deal with this issue a lot. Dropdowns are notorious for slowing down users because they're hard to navigate with the keyboard. For example, some state dropdowns use "NV - Nevada", others just "Nevada", and some just "NV" -- in any case, it's hard for users to predict what to ...


2

I would argue that a good number of people think of the two-letter abbreviation when they think of their state(s). A form that accounts for both short and long-form manual input and a traditional drop-down list would be ideal in my mind. I'm imagining something like a standard text field that validates on either the abbreviation or the full name, and if ...


2

You're going about it the right way. Don't make the user enter the address multiple times, if you can avoid it. You could certainly look at Amazon.com as a pattern. They allow you to enter an address, if needed, but the default is to use one of the addresses you have already entered. If you only have one address, provide that. If you have multiple ...


1

The flaw you described is covered by Nielsen Heuristic "Visibility of System status" The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate feedback within reasonable time. Your internal system state has the new address, but the user still see's the old address until "much later". It is critical that the internal ...


1

+1 one for a good UX question! Trust that the user is doing what he wants to do and skip all "are you sure" dialoges. Instead - make sure the user notices that he has moved the pin a long way from the original place and make it easy for the user to reset the position if he finds out that it's wrong. This way of designing stuff is, amongst others, ...


1

Do you know why the users are moving the pin? Is it by accident or because their first drop was not correct? If it's accidental then you have a usability problem where the user is doing something they don't intend to do. If that is the case, change your interaction so the UI isn't so touchy. If they are moving the pin because they didn't "mean" to ...


1

It's better to allow non-Latin characters for two reasons: 1. For international delivery by mail, only country needs to be in Latin characters. Local post will do the job better if they'll be able to read an address in native language. 2. If address will be read by another users, it's still better to have native version, because conversion to Latin can be ...


1

I don't know many "normal" users who navigate forms using their keyboard. Most people I know use their mouse (from interacting with/helping people I work with), and a drop-down/select fits this use case. I personally tend to use my keyboard to tab to the select and then type "C" 3 times to get to "Connecticut". The only problem I see with a text field is ...


1

This sounds like a good use case for a third party API. Here are a few options: Expedia Affiliate Network - May charge commission on booking, but have a comprehensive API available. Wego Hotels API - They offer a paid service. They will return the hotel rates for you in the metadata, but it was unclear in the documentation if they can provide airport ...


1

Try "Postal address". As a non-native-English speaker I would never confuse it with email address. However, I don't know how common this term is among native English speakers. Also: Provide examples as a placeholder or a label beside the input.


1

The most flexible way is used by Google Maps. Try to enter your test sample with 49th and you'll see that it is like your third variant. Is it what you are looking for? But there is another problem - such user friendly solution may become hard work for developers to implement it. Also, using simple well structured form may be simple in programming and cause ...



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