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I have to agree with you. One argument that might be given in favor of using both directions is that the standard menu triangle or > (the one that appears on drop-downs, for example) shows directionality. That argument, however, doesn't hold, as unlike with the majority of icons, arrows are necessarily directional. If you look at icons for buttons that ...


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The best example I can think of is Youtube. Though it's not video, but can work really well in the case of image gallery as well. The bottom bar can be used to show the current position in the gallery and allow users to click on either image or the button at bottom right corner to enlarge the image and enter the full-screen gallery view mode.


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Your case reminds me CNN's app, and here's the suggestion: As soon as the users enters the screen an icon of a camera (with the number of pictures on the gallery) appears. This icon vanishes after a few seconds thus leaving the image clear. If the user taps on the image, the user will be send to the gallery (last image on the right). On the gallery you ...


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From my experience, it's almost always best not to use an icon without text if there isn't already a very, very commonly used icon for the desired action. I was once running a comprehension test on potential users for the Waze gps app and almost no one could say what one of their icons was supposed to communicate because they had never seen it before.


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It's best to use an icon that people already know. The Apple Store uses this: The App Store uses this: Note that they both include a text label.


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Is this icon helpful? Description: Arrow: Shows files needs to be downloaded. Plus: Shows files are new. Horizontal Bar with three white circles: Shows an electronic system where new files will be downloaded. Let me know if that works.


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Ok, on a more serious note: I envision a badge or certificate-looking seal with an up arrow to indicate "Upgrade". Something like this:



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