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24

The major mobile touch screen operating systems (iOS, Windows Phone 7, Android) don't trouble the user with "closing" applications in the way that desktop applications do. This simplifies the experience, making applications appear seamlessly built into the operating system. Typically, applications on these operating systems will "pause" when the user ...


14

The word New is generally used when you are adding something new to a existing list or creating a new list or object or account. So for example you might use New in conjunction with Create or add to highlight that an new entity is being added or created. As Samuel mentioned you might use Add to add an item to an exiting list or collection (example adding ...


12

It's quite an age old question in UX/Universal Design. But, with time I feel the importance diminishing. Some reasons maybe true globalization of products/brands/english language/etc. I know companies still have to rebrand their products based on the country the are launching in, but those cases are getting fewer. Once again, just a personal observation. ...


10

I would use different visual indicators, and a secondary, like so: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The important thing is how often users will be selecting the actions... if they will 'Accept' 90% of the time, Reject 9%, and cancel 1%, then it's likely Accept should be larger/easier to hit than Reject, as shown ...


10

Another way of doing this is by placing check boxes in front of every row and adding actions (Edit, Export, Delete) on single or multiple selection at the bottom but it really depends on the case. You can also have a top check box for selecting all rows in the table or on the current page (if you have pagination.)


8

You could proceed as follows: Try to reduce the width of the particular columns. This way you gain space. Move the contextmenu completely to the right, such that all actions are under one hood. Reconsider your actions. Prioritize and group them and correct the layout correspondingly. And in detail: Regarding 1.: For example, the column description ...


8

Given that you mentioned yourself that the user has already initiated the action, it is likely that the user will want to confirm the action. Cancel is not really an action, but rather a dismissal of the modal dialog. Given that, I suggest you strongly de-emphasize the cancel button. If you do, it becomes clear that you do not need the color coding in the ...


8

Create. Use this word when you are about to make a new non-child record. On a listing window or page (we'll call it a view for convenience), there should be a "Create" link that will take the user to a new view where they get to enter all of the record's data. The new view should be entitled with the word Create, and the button to commit should be labeled ...


7

The last thing you want when you have a lot of tables/lists of records is to make the data less readable by having more noise and clutter from permanent buttons, links or drop down arrows, so I favour the hover approach in this instance. Change the cursor on hover, to aid visual feedback. Align edited text with cell content where relevant so that it doesn't ...


7

Personally, I would make the UI different to compensate for their similarity. If they were both buttons, a user may accidently click on one than the other. Disable works well with toggles because it can be reversed. The delete action can be as simple as an icon or button. A trashcan or X is pretty universal.


6

It can be confusing to put something that is (that is the status) in a button that represents something that could be, (that is the action). Try to separate the Status and the Action (or button) into two clearly different elements, for example a text label and a button: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Then apply ...


6

In western culture, red has a negative connotation (however for Japan this is the opposite). It is used as a warning or error, so using it as the primary option is a violation of the consistency principle (at least for most users). While cultural meaning might not be as important as it used to be, having consistent user interfaces is. Since most ...


6

Usually it's a Terms of Service agreement, and by clicking the button you're agreeing to the terms. I never read them but they probably have the usual disclaimers, no guarantee of privacy, etc.


6

Applications all over the place tend to rely on a color scheme that has already, to a certain extent, become a standard. Red means: Oh no! Careful! Beware! ATTENTION!!! Green means: Safe. Go for it. Ah yes, nothing to worry about. I don't think it slows a user down, quite the contrary actually. Since universally applications have adopted red and green to ...


5

You can use two actions in a row, Apple does support that with its standard UI elements. Its called the Detail Disclosure button. * * Users tap a detail disclosure button to reveal additional information or functionality related to a specific item. The additional details or functionality are revealed in a separate view. * From IOS Human Interface ...


5

Closing iPhone applications from within the app itself goes against Apple guidelines, so most developers would not take this route for fear of the app being rejected from the App store. Quitting from within the app "looks like a crash to the user." (Apple's words, not mine). There's a question on StackOverflow about this issue.


5

It makes no sense to consider a single color. You have to consider the color in its context. No one was ever stopped from drinking Coca-Cola because of the red in the logo. So long as the context and the surroundings are unknown, it is impossible to give an informed opinion on a choice of color.


5

Your actions are different: Edit is individual for each record in sense it starts another form for editing this particular record. Export and Delete are batch actions which could be made on a set of records. So Edit could be done by double-click and Export, Delete could be done using multiselection with checkboxes and single action button.


5

Although the question does ask specifically about the colour I would like to make the following suggestion: With a critical function such as the one you describe you want to make the function interaction steps different from other interaction steps associated with less destructive actions to avoid a user following a repetitive, almost sub-conscious pattern ...


4

Personally, if I were to develop an Android app I wouldn't include a close button either. As others previously mentioned, it's too easy to accidentally hit the close button inadvertently. What I would do, is include a close/quit command as an option that comes up when the user hits the Menu button. It just feels like it should be a menu option instead of a ...


4

Neither options seem ideal since the user cannot provide login information right aways and I think that's what users expect when presented with login. If several login options are supported it could default to the most frequently used option and also remember what the user picked previous time allowing users to log in with a single click. If you have to ...


4

If you check the 10 items you really wants and by mistake click outside the checkbox it unselect everything and select only one row. It's going to be annoying specially on mobile devices where accurate click position is not so easy to achieve. As the click row could be useful (if selecting one row is common usage) I suggest very small modification. When 2 ...


4

If you go with a two-click confirmation process, you should ensure the design can't be tripped by a double-click. Worse would be if in the design a double-click could result in either a confirm-confirm or a confirm-cancel, depending on which end of the button they double-click. One way would of course be the second approach you mentioned, that of "using a ...


4

download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups I might suggest putting the "Unverify" action into the context of each row, so that it's clearer that "Verify" is the primary action, and also to avoid accidental Unverifications.


3

I like Myrddin's suggestion a lot and think the concept works. Another option, to get away from red/green (which can look the same to some color blind users]) and use a green check icon in conjunction with "Accept" and a red x icon in conjunction with "Reject". If the icons are different colors that's a good visual cue to those that can see it, but the ...


3

If you mean to track all the user actions like: how many people downloaded a file, how many readed a document, how many visited a page; you can use Google Analytics. Obviously you need to set it up in order to track everything. Take a look at the features that GA offer: http://www.google.com/analytics/features/content.html There is also a real time ...


3

Honestly, I don't think the answer to this is UX related. It certainly can't be related to the size of the 'close' button being too small-- tablets are plenty big and don't have close buttons either. I think the answer is just system resources. Mobile devices are slow, and it's a lot easier to switch between apps if they stay open in memory. If you're a ...


3

Regarding the 4 popular actions you have in the "Options" column: If you have more than 4 actions, you can change the fourth action to "More..." and when clicked, show the complete context menu for this row. This is much harder for a user to miss. You may need to move the context menu completely to the right as well, like Anna Prenzel's suggestion, if you ...


3

I'd say that for the mobile environment, your first scenario would be preferred in my opinion. Limiting unnecessary actions is always best for on the go browsing that is done on mobile devices. The only downfall, I suppose, would be in the event of a misclick it might be inconvenient that the event has already triggered - depending on what that event is... ...


3

As a designer, red is considered to provoke the most response amongst users. However depending on how the color is used it can have positive or negative effects. Within my workplace the use of a navy blue color as a primary action button and a light grey color as a secondary button are practiced. These colors provide a balance to forms located throughout ...



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